Discovery @ UCSB Seminars List - 2014

Note: "Freshman Seminars" were re-named "Exploration Seminars" starting in Fall 2017.

Fall 2014

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
9:30-11:20 AM
ARTS 1344

Enrollment code: 59626

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Professor Kip Fulbeck a pioneering artist, spoken word performer, author and filmmaker. He has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show, and PBS, and has performed and exhibited in over twenty countries and throughout the U.S. More information is available at: www.redsushi.com.

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

1st 5 Thursdays
1:00-2:50 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 59188

This seminar focuses on contemporary political issues both domestically and internationally.  It allows students to discuss a range of local, national, and international issues with other students.  The seminar also puts these issues in a broader historical context.  Each week students introduce news items to be discussed.

Professor Mario Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies.  He specializes in the history of the Chicano/Latino experience in the United States.  He has published numerous books on Chicano history and teaches courses on Chicano history, Introduction to Chicano Studies, Chicano/Latino autobiography, and Chicano/Latino religions.  For his research and teaching, Professor Garcia has received numerous awards.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

FIELD TRIP

Saturday, October 25, 2014, 8:30 am - 5:20 pm

Enrollment code: 27334

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Paintings from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
2:00-4:20 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 59196

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing primarily on Mexico and Argentina. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960's, the aftermath of dictatorships, and the effects of civil war. How do feature and documentary films re-articulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences? We will combine close readings of select films with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken specializes in Latin American literature and cultural studies, and U.S. Latino/a literature.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 PM
HSSB 4201

Enrollment code: 27342

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot’s fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe?  Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper’s main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.The Beauty of Mathematics

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94ME: Moral Paradoxes
Professor Matthew Hanser, Philosophy

Fridays
1100-1150am
HSSB 1237

Enrollment code: 64196

This is an introduction to moral philosophy via the examination of certain moral "paradoxes."

Matthew Hanser is a professor in the Department of Philosophy.  His research focuses on problems in moral philosophy and the philosophy of action.

hanser@philosophy.ucsb.edu

INT 94OD: The Cuban Revolution: An Introduction
Professor Juan Lupi, Spanish & Portuguese

Tuesdays
5:00-5:50 PM
GIRV 2123

Enrollment code: 59204

The 1959 Cuban Revolution was arguably the most important political events in the Americas of the second half of the 20th century. Its leaders (Fidel Castro, Che Guevara) have acquired mythical status. This seminar provides an overview of the Revolution since its beginnings in the 1960's to the "Special Period" after the fall of the Soviet bloc. We will watch documentary footage and one feature film, and read a small selection of writings of the era.

Professor Lupi is Associate Professor (Spanish and Portuguese, Comparative Literature). His areas of specialization and interest include: Caribbean literatures and cultures, contemporary Cuban studies, contemporary Venezuelan studies, literature and science, literature and philosophy.

jplupi@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94OL: James Joyce's Ulysses
Professor Enda Duffy, English

Tuesdays
12:00-12:50 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 59212

This is your opportunity to read, over ten weeks, the most brilliant, and the most dangerous, novel ever written in the English language.  Every undergraduate should be able to say that they have read this book.  First banned in America and after its publication in Paris in 1921, it has nevertheless been widely acknowledged since as an amazing, groundbreaking wildly ambitious text.  It concerns one day in the life of Leopold Bloom, his wife Molly, who spends the day in bed, and a very recent college graduate, Stephen Dedalus, who spends the day wandering around Dublin.  The book is shocking, exasperating, and also very funny.  You owe it to yourself to read it.

Professor Enda Duffy is the author of The Subaltern Ulysses (Minnesota, 1996) and The Speed Handbook (Duke, 2009), co-editor of Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism (European Joyce Series, 2011), editor of editions of Ulysses and The Best Short Stories of Catherine Mansfield, and author of many articles on modernism, critical theory, Joyce and Irish literature.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Werner Kuhn, Center for Spatial Studies

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 27417

Explore spatial reasoning and computing for problem solving (sciences), creative expression (arts), and interpretation (humanities). Learn how statistics, graphs, maps, and virtual reality aid learning, analysis, data visualization,discovery/solutions to socio-environmental problems, and space/place interpretation. Professors Kuhn and Hegarty will be joined by visiting professors from the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, and engineering to illustrate how spatial tools are used to integrate knowledge across disciplines.

Werner Kuhn, Professor in the Department of Geography, investigates how spatial data and analyses can come to serve all scientific disciplines and support transdisciplinary problem solving.  Mary Hegarty, Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, investigates spatial cognition and the uses of diagrammatic reasoning for problem solving.

werner@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 PM
TD-W 1530

Enrollment code: 27425

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance. It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes of design and production for theater and dance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: TOP GIRLS, THE FAIRYTALE LIVES OF RUSSIAN GIRLS and EQUIVOCATION.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PU: History in the Digital Age
Professor Claudio Fogu, French and Italian

Thursdays
3:30-4:20 PM
PHELPS 5316

Enrollment code: 59220

When one thinks about ‘history,’ as a form of knowledge about the past, one generally pictures a book, a library, or an archive. And yet, one could argue that most of the history we learn today comes from images and digital sources: digitalized movies, documentaries, as well as web pages. As in most other fields of our lives, the so called ‘digital turn’ in the human sciences has raised new questions that will be discussed in this seminar starting from selected readings (available in digital format only) and exploring examples of digital history as different as the 9/11 Digital Archive, historical GISs (Geographical Information Systems), and the videogames such as Sid Meier’s Civilization.

I am a cultural historian interested in the development of modern historical culture and consciousness from the late 18th century to the present. In particular I have studied visual-public forms of representation under the Italian-fascist regime, written extensively on the politics of memory in postwar Europe, and published on various philosophical issues related to the discipline of history. In recent years I have turned my attention to the digitalization of our historical imagination.

cfogu@frit.ucsb.edu

INT 94PW: Human Memory
Professor Stan Klein, Psychological & Brain Sciences

Mondays
1:00-1:50 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 59238

What is memory?  How is it affected by brain injury and cognitive pathology?  This seminar will look at what memory is and what it is not.  It will argue that the concept of memory is really a set of related yet separable psychological functions that can "come apart" in various disorders -- such as amnesia, autism, Alzheimer's dementia and schizophrenia

Stan Klein is Professor of Psychology with affiliation in Philosophy.  He earned his BA at Stanford, PhD at Harvard and has been at UCSB since 1990.

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94PX: Preparation for Admission to Schools of the Health Professions
Dr. Stephen Blain, College of Letters and Science

Tuesdays
3:30-4:20 pm
PHELPS 1508

Enrollment code: 69062

This series of seminars is designed to expose incoming students to the academic and non-academic prerequisites necessary for admission to schools of the various health professions to enable the student to complete all of the requirements in a timely manner. In addition to course requirements and academic performance, additional topics will include research, internships, admissions testing, letters of recommendation and interviews.

Dr. Blain is a clinical Professor Emeritus from UCLA and Professor Emeritus on recall at UCSB. He is a pediatric dentist and former Associate Dean of Admission, Student Affairs and Financial Aid at the UCLA School of Dentistry and chair of the admissions committee and counsels students in the L&S Advising Office.

sblain@ltsc.ucsb.edu

INT 94QJ: Work and Laziness
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Thursdays
10:00-10:50 AM
SH 2635

Enrollment code: 27458

Is it better to work or to be lazy? What is at stake in each choice? Have people always been asked to be productive and self-disciplined or is the work ethic a modern concept? Can one consume without producing? We will address these questions by studying the idea of the work ethic and "the right to be lazy" in modern twentieth century novels: Herman Melville's Bartleby the Scrivener, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Georges Perec's Things.

Maurizia Boscagli teaches in the English Department and is affiliated with the Program of Comparative Literature and the Department of Feminist Studies. She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body, and another on materialism and everyday materiality. She specializes in 20th and 21st century literature and culture, film and photography. In the English Department she teaches classes on gender and modernity, international modernism, femininity and transgression, 20th century urban culture, the everyday, and work and precarity and their representation in literature and film.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94QK: Samurai and Violence
Professor Luke Roberts, History

Wednesday
3:00-3:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 27466

The general aim of this course is to introduce to you how an historian works.   How do historians read documents?  What do they hope to gain from the documents?  What do they want to tell others about the past?  We will practice the study of document contexts, how to identify or build an historical thesis/argument.  The specific aim of this course is to learn about the samurai of Japan and their relationship to violence.

Luke Roberts researches and teaches pre-modern Japanese history.   He is currently writing a book called "A Samurai's Life" and is thinking about the place of violence in the life of a samurai.   When were they violent?  How did they justify it? When were they uncomfortable with violence?  How did they define what was good violence and bad violence?  When and how did they restrain it?  How did they debate the character of violence?

lukerobt@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94QO: In Search of the Truth: Science versus Religion
Professor John Lew, Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Biology

Wednesdays
6:00-6:50 PM
TD-W 2600

Enrollment code: 59618

One of the most highly charged controversies and deepest divides in Western culture is that between the academic left versus the religious right.  Both proclaim a strong passion to discover life's mysteries and a so-called "Truth", yet rarely can either side come to discuss, let alone appreciate, the others views.  We will discuss what the root issues are, and how we may educate ourselves from both points of view to become agents of reconciliation.

Dr. Lew is Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at UCSB.  His field of research is Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and development of novel bio-technologies. His passion is graduate and undergraduate mentorship.  He has a personal interest in controversies surrounding science and religion.

John.Lew@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94RF: The Middle East Uprisings
Professor Nancy Gallagher, History

Tuesdays
4:00-4:50 PM
HSSB 1237

Enrollment code: 59246

Popular discontent erupted in Iran, Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Syria, and Turkey. Young people called for greater freedom, dignity, and jobs. Years of frustration at repressive regimes gave way to calls for democracy, for liberal governments, to more open societies. In each society, established classes fought against political, social, and economic change. Initial euphoria gave way to the realization that revolutionary change was far more complex than it appeared. This interactive seminar will discuss the roles that student movements played and why change proved so difficult.

Nancy Gallagher is a Research Professor of History at UCSB. She is currently chairing the Middle East Studies Program. She spent 2011-13 in Egypt where she was study center director of the UCEAP program at the American University in Cairo. She was visiting professor at AUC and taught courses on oral history, women and gender, and the Egyptian uprisings. She visited Turkey several times in connection with the UCEAP program. She is currently writing about the media and the Egyptian uprising of 2011.

gallagher@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94RL: Ancient Mayan Astronomy
Professor Gerardo Aldana, Chicana/o Studies

Tuesdays
1100-1150 AM
TD-W 2600

Enrollment code: 59550

Hands-on activities guide the student through the practice of naked-eye observation based Mayan astronomy.  A basic introduction to Mayan hieroglyphic writing and calendrics provides the background for the political and astrological applications of ancient astronomies.

Professor Gerardo Aldana gives courses on Ancient Mesoamerica and the History and Anthropology of Science.  His research focuses on scientific records found within Classic Mayan hieroglyphic texts.  He then uses the insights gained into ancient indigenous science to reflect on modern uses of science and technology.

gvaldana@chicst.ucsb.edu

Spring 2014

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
9:30-11:20 am
ARTS 1344

Enrollment code: 25908

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Professor Kip Fulbeck a pioneering artist, spoken word performer, author and filmmaker. He has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show, and PBS, and has performed and exhibited in over twenty countries and throughout the U.S. More information is available at: www.redsushi.com

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

FIELD TRIP (2-day seminar)
Saturday, April 12 at 9:00 - 11:00 am (classroom instruction), and
Saturday, *April 26 at 8:30 am - 5:20 pm (field trip to Getty Museum)

*Please note: new date of April 26th

Enrollment code: 25916

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William King, Theater and Dance

Thursdays
5:00-5:50 pm
TD 2517

Enrollment code: 25924

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in  dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish & Portuguese

1st 4 Wednesdays
2:00-4:20 pm
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 56275

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing primarily on Mexico and Argentina. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960's, the aftermath of dictatorships, and the effects of civil war. How do feature and documentary films re-articulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences? We will combine close readings of select films with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Professor Ellen McCracken specializes in Latin American literature and cultural studies and U.S. Latino literature.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protect your Brain or Else!
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
3:00 – 3:50 pm
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25940

You are your brain. You don’t exist without it and the better it functions, the happier you will be. The seminar surveys the effects of injuries to the brain, some are subtle; some are devastating. However, many types of brain damage can be avoided. The seminar covers these and other types of brain injuries that you may witness in your friends or family members.

Dr. Revlin studies how different parts of the brain affect how people remember, reason, and decide on things. He has collected a rich set of examples of people, especially university aged students, with damage to different parts of the brain and what they can and cannot do.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94LY: Modernist Architecture in Los Angeles
Professor Sven Spieker, Germanic, Slavic & Semitic Studies

THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELED

FIELD TRIP
Friday, May 23 at 11:00-12:50 am (classroom instruction), and
Saturday, May 24 at 8:00 am-4:00 pm (field trip)

Enrollment code: 56283

The seminar meets on two days. On the first day, we will begin with a slide-assisted examination of early to mid-20th century domestic architecture in Europe and the United States. Then, we will assess some buildings on the UCSB campus for their "modernist" elements. On the second day, the focus of our interest will be buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolf Schindler, and Richard Neutra, all of whom were active in L.A. in the first half of the 20th century. We will learn about the economics and the design of early 20th century homes, and about the history of their preservation. Time will be spent at the Schindler archive at UCSB where much of the famous architect's archive is preserved. The students will learn what role archives such as this one can play when it comes to preserving architecture. They will also be able to interact with some more unique materials preserved on our campus. We will visit the Schindler home in West Hollywood, as well as Wright's Hollyhock house in Hollywood, and Richard Neutra's VDL research house. We will study our buildings and learn about their design, history of their preservation, and current uses. I hope to be able to involve and official from L.A.'s municipal preservation agency in the hopes that he/or she meet with us briefly. I plan to give the students group assignments that lets them search the buildings we visit for specifically "modernist" elements.

Professor Sven Spieker teaches in the Comparative Literature Program; the Department of Art and Art History; and the Department of Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He specializes in European modernism, with an emphasis on the Eastern European avant-gardes, contemporary art with an emphasis on Eastern Europe and critical theory. Professor Spieker has published on topics ranging from the Russian avant-garde (Malevich, Rodchenko, Dziga Vertov) to late 20th century art and aesthetics. His essays and articles have appeared in German, Russian, Swedish, Polish and English. Professor Spieker has organized several international conferences most recently, The Office in the Studio: The Administration of Modernism at the University of Jena, Germany. His latest book publication focused on the archive as a crucible of European modernism (The Big Archive, MIT Press, 2008).  Professor Spieker is the editor of ARTMargins and ARTMargins Online(www.artmargins.com).

spieker@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries and History
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays
1:00-2:50 PM
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25981

This seminar will focus on recent film documentaries for public television or theaters and that concern Chicano/Latino historical issues.  Each week the seminar will watch and discuss a film documentary and Professor Garcia will present the historical context of each film.

Mario Garcia is Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies and History.  He teaches courses on Chicano history; Introduction to Chicano St., Chicano/Latino Autobiography; and Chicano/Latino religions.  Professor Garcia has written books on Mexican immigration; Mexican American political leadership. and Chicano Catholicism.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94OT: Democratizing Gender: Reconstructions of Masculinity & Femininity in the New Millennium
Professor Edwina Barvosa, Chicana/o Studies

1st 5 Wednesdays
12:30-2:20 pm
South Hall 1623

*Check GOLD for enrollment code

This seminar explores the interconnection between two major concepts: democratization & gender. In different ways, both concepts remain deeply debated today.  We will explore these debates, and consider whether old and new gender inequities might be addressed through democratizing social practices that potentially reshape our sense of gender relations.

Dr. Edwina Barvosa is a political scientist specializing in social and political theory, and racial, ethnic and gender studies. She earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her M.A. from Cambridge University. Her gender research focuses on how gender inequities that affect both men and woman can be transformed though social reconstruction.

barvosa@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94PJ: Soldiers and Civilians in the Recent Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
Professor Susan Derwin, German/Comp. Lit./Interdisciplinary Humanities Center

Tuesday
9:00 – 9:50 am
WEBB 1100

Enrollment code: 58834

This seminar will explore how the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been represented in the media, in literature, in Hollywood films and in documentaries. Topic to be chosen from among the following themes: war trauma, PTSD, the struggles of homecoming that veterans face, military loved ones, drone warfare, post 9/11 global politics.

Susan Derwin is Professor of Comparative Literature and Director of UCSB's Interdisciplinary Humanities Center. Her reach and teaching interests include Holocaust and Trauma Studies, psychoanalytic theory, and the literature of the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  She also facilitates a writing workshop for UCSB's student veterans and military dependents.

derwin@ihc.ucsb.edu

INT 94PL: What is Computing?
Professor Tevfik Bultan, Computer Science

Thursdays
11:00-11:50 am
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 66167

Computer technology has produced many impressive gadgets that surround us every day. However, foundations of computing are still a mystery to many. The purpose of this seminar is to discuss what computing is, and help students gain insights about the essence of computing and its future potential.

Professor Bultan conducts research on improving the dependability of computer systems, focusing particularly on software dependability. He believes that software development should and could be easier and less error prone.

bultan@cs.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From the Page to the Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 pm
TDW 1530

Enrollment code: 26021

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes of design and production for theater and dance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction. Her recent work at UCSB includes: THESE SHINING LIVES, ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps} and EURYDICE.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94QD: Studying Abroad
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50
GIRV 2123

Enrollment code: 58719

This course is concerned with a variety of topics related to undergraduate studying abroad:  program opportunities, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, overcoming challenges, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus work on a project focusing on study abroad's connection with their majors.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

jcampo@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94QH: Global Warming, Hoax or Disaster?
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

First 5 Fridays
10:00-11:50 pm
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 64956

The number of Americans who worry about global warming has gone down in the last ten years from 75% to about 50%. Is there less to worry about? What really is the science of climate change? Are the skeptics right? We will explore both the science and the politics of what may (or may not be) either the greatest hoax or the greatest crisis facing planet earth.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental, Analytical, and Freshman Chemistry as well as special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as analysis of artifacts in art and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94QO: In Search of the Truth: Science versus Religion
Professor John Lew, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Wednesdays
6:00-6:50 pm
*Check GOLD for class location and enrollment code

One of the most highly charged controversies and deepest divides in Western culture is that between the academic left versus the religious right.  Both proclaim a strong passion in search of the truth, yet rarely can either side come to discuss, let alone appreciate, the others views.  We will discuss what the major issues are, and how we may come to be agents of reconciliation.

Dr. Lew is Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at UCSB.  His field of research is Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and development of novel bio-technologies. His passion is graduate and undergraduate teaching and mentorship. He has a personal interest in controversies surrounding science and religion.

John.Lew@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94QX: What White People Need to Know
Professsor Paul Spickard, History

Tuesdays
4:00-4:50 pm
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 56291

America is a racialized country.  Our race has a profound effect on how we perceive ourselves, how others treat us, and our life chances.  There are certain things that White Americans need to know and to think about in order for us maximize our potential and make it possible for us to act as citizens in a positive manner.  This course will prepare students to do that.

Paul Spickard is professor of history and affiliate professor of Black Studies and Asian American Studies at UCSB.  He has published seventeen books and seventy-odd articles on racial subjects.  He has won eighteen teaching awards.  Among his courses are Interracial Intimacy, Modern World History, and Race and Immigration in US History.

spickard@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94QY: The 'Discovery' of America in the 15th and 16th Centuries: An Economic and Ideological Background
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50 am
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 56309

This course is an analysis of the economic reasons that motivated European interest in the western coast of Africa and America and the ideology behind the early exploration and colonization of the Caribbean and American territory.

Professor Cortijo specializes in Medieval and Early Modern history and culture. He has published monographs on the history of religion, political ideology, early American history, as well as numerous editions of 16th and 17th Spanish literature.

cortijo@aspanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94QZ: Evil
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Mondays
12:00-12:50 PM
Check GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 56317

In this course we shall consider discussions and analysis of the question of evil as presented by philosophers, political theorists, theologians, poets, and psychologists.  Is there a common essence to phenomena such as vice, malevolence, injustice, wanton cruelty, willful destruction, sin, and hard-hearted indifference to the suffering of others?  How ought we to understand such things, and what do they tell us about human beings and their actual and proper relationships to the world around them, one another, and themselves?  Student evaluation will be based upon quizzes and class participation.

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary philosophy, with an emphasis on political philosophy, though he has also written on film and contemporary American politics.  He has previously taught Freshman Seminars on Existentialism and on Politics and Film.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

Winter 2014

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94BZ: Genetic Modification of Food Crops
Professor Rolf Christoffersen, Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Biology

Fridays
200 PM-250 PM
HSSB  1232

Enrollment code: 62422

The seminar will explore the implications of genetic modification of our food crops with special emphasis on the application of recombinant DNA technology for crop improvement. The scientific basis of these technologies will be explained at the level of a non-science major. Course materials will include articles from the popular scientific press concerning the dangers and benefits of genetically modified crops. The potential impact of GMO crops (both good and bad) on agriculture in developing countries will also be covered.

Dr. Christoffersen received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles and did postdoctoral studies at McGill University and the University of California, Davis. The general area of interest in his laboratory is the biochemistry and molecular biology of higher plants. He teaches Introductory Biology and Molecular Genetics.

rolf.christoffersen@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays
1:00 PM-2:50 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 62398

This seminar will focus on contemporary U.S. political issues, both domestic and foreign policy, and attempt to frame them from a historical perspective.  Each week key and current issues will be discussed by students as well as students initiating discussion by reporting on a political issue that they would like the seminar to discuss.

Prof. Mario T. Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He teaches courses on Chicano history; Chicano autobiography and history; Chicano/Latino religions; and Introduction to Chicano St.  He has written books on Mexican immigration; Mexican American political leadership; and Chicano Catholic history.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

***FIELD TRIP***
Saturday, February 15, 2014
12:00-1:50 pm (classroom instruction – ARTS 2622)
-and-
Saturday, February 22, 2014
8:30-5:20 pm (field trip)

Enrollment code: 26997

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patrons original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings, prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William King, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
5:00-5:50 pm
Location:  TD-W 2517

Enrollment code: 27003

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in  dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94IE: Afro-Asian Solidarities and the Long Freedom Movement: Richard Aoki, Black Panthers, and Asian American Activism
Professor Diane Fujino, Asian American Studies

Thursdays
11:00-11:50 am
NH 1111

Enrollment code: 66308

Explores the life of Richard Aoki, a Japanese American leader of the Black Panther Party, Third World strike at Berkeley, and early Asian American Movement.  Examines historical forces; WWII concentration camps, Cold War masculinity, 1960s activism - connecting activism across time. Study the construction of narrative stories and interpretive history.

Diane Fujino studies Asian American activism and Afro-Asian solidarities.  Her book, Heartbeat of Struggle, is on Yuri Kochiyama, who worked with Malcolm X in Harlem.  Her edited volume, Wicked Theory, Naked Practice, presents Fred Ho’s writings on experimental ‘jazz’ music and radical activism. Her latest book is on Richard Aoki.

fujino@asamst.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
1:00-3:20 PM
HSSB 1223

Enrollment code: 66316

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing primarily on Mexico and Argentina. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the aftermath of     dictatorships, and the effects of civil war. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences? We will combine close readings of select films with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.  

Ellen McCracken specializes in Latin American literature and cultural studies and U.S. Latino literature.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JM: Evolution, Creationism, and Intelligent Design
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesday
2:00 – 2:50 pm
Location – check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 61689

Almost 50% of respondents in a recent Gallup Poll agreed with the statement that God created humans pretty much in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years or so. What are the merits of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design?  What are the distinguishing characteristics of science and how well does each of these qualify to be taught in a science course? We will discuss the issues surrounding this important contemporary debate.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protect your Brain or Else!
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
3:00-3:50pm
Location – check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59121

You are your brain. You don’t exist without it and the better it functions, the happier you will be. The seminar surveys the effects of injuries to the brain, some are subtle; some are devastating. However, many types of brain damage can be avoided. The seminar covers these and other types of brain injuries that you may witness in your friends or family members.

Dr. Revlin studies how different parts of the brain affect how people remember, reason, and decide on things. He has collected a rich set of examples of people, especially university aged students, with damage to different parts of the brain and what they can and cannot do.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94LQ: On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources
Professor Clarence Barlow, Music

1st 6 Tuesdays
3:00 - 4:50 p.m.
Location: MUSIC 1145

Enrollment code: 27045

This seminar offers six illustrated lectures (100 minutes each plus a short break) in which Prof. Barlow demonstrates how music can be derived from language, other musics and algorithms. He will profusely illustrate his lectures with examples of his own music, occasionally referring to music by contemporary colleagues.

After teaching composition in the Netherlands and Germany for 22 years, Prof. Clarence Barlow took up the position of Corwin Chair and Composition Program Head at UCSB\'s Music Department in 2006. His main interest is computer-aided composition for acoustic and electronic instruments, often derived from musical and extramusical sources.

barlow@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94LV: Biotechnology and Society
Professor Douglas Thrower, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Wednesdays
12:00-12:50PM
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment code: 62430

This course will cover topics including the high cost of drugs, finding a cure for cancer, genetically modified organisms, genetic profiling, gene therapy, cloning, stem cells, forensic biology, biotechnology and global warming, and will conclude with a "field trip" to a research lab.

Dr. Thrower is a lecturer in the Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Department (MCDB).  The undergraduate courses he teaches include Genetics (MCDB 101A), Biochemistry (MCDB 108C), Pharmacology (MCDB 126A, 126BL), and Cell Cycle Regulation (MCDB 194DT).  He is also engaged in research to determine if some cancer drugs produce changes in the structure of microtubules.

thrower@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94LY: Modernist Architecture in Los Angeles
Professor Sven Spieker, Germanic, Slavic & Semitic Studies

***FIELD TRIP***

Friday, February 21, 2014
11:00-12:50 pm
GIRV 2135

-and-

Saturday, February 22, 2014
8:00 am-4:00 pm
Field Trip

Enrollment code: 66928

The seminar meets on two days. On the first day, we will begin with a slide-assisted examination of early to mid-20th-century domestic architure in Europe and the United States. Then, we will assess some buildings on the UCSB campus for their "modernist" elements. On the second day, the focus of our interest will be buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolf Schindler, and Richard Neutra, all of whom were active in L.A. in the first half of the 20th century. We will learn about the economics and the design of early 20th-century homes, and about the history of their preservation. Time will be spent at the Schindler archive at UCSB where much of the famous architect's archive is preserved. The students will learn what role archives such as this one can play when it comes to preserving architecture. They will also be able to interact with some more unique materials preserved on our campus. We will visit the Schindler home in West Hollywood, as well as Wright's Hollyhock house in Hollywood, and Richard Neutra's VDL research house. We will study our buildings and learn about their design, history of their preservation, and current uses. I hope to be able to involve and official from L.A.'s municipal preservation agency in the hopes that he/or she meet with us briefly. I plan to give the students group assignments that lets them search the buildings we visit for specifically "modernist" elements.

Professor Sven Spieker teaches in the Comparative Literature Program; the Department of Art and Art History; and the Department of Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He specializes in European modernism, with an emphasis on the Eastern European avant-gardes, contemporary art with an emphasis on Eastern Europe and critical theory. Professor Spieker has published on topics ranging from the Russian avant-garde (Malevich, Rodchenko, Dziga Vertov) to late 20th-century art and aesthetics. His essays and articles have appeared in German, Russian, Swedish, Polish and English. Professor Spieker has organized several international conferences most recently, The Office in the Studio: The Administration of Modernism at the University of Jena, Germany. His latest book publication focused on the archive as a crucible of European modernism (The Big Archive, MIT Press, 2008).  Professor Spieker is the editor of ARTMargins and ARTMargins Online(www.artmargins.com).

spieker@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94ME: Moral Paradoxes
Professor Matthew Hanser, Philosophy

Fridays
1:00 – 1:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 27078

This seminar is an introduction to problems in moral philosophy via the examination of ten "moral paradoxes."

Matthew Hanser is Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Philosophy Department.

hanser@philosophy.ucsb.edu

INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Mondays
2:00 - 3:50 PM
HSSB  4202

Enrollment code: 62471

Gallup Polls show that two thirds of Americans do not think global warming is a threat and almost half of all Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should we really worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternate medicine really quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say?  Should schools and universities teach all sides of these controversies? Explore the history, politics, and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental, Analytical, and Freshman Chemistry as well as special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as analysis of artifacts in art and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94NE: Marine Fish Culture
Professor Peter Collins, Ecology Evolution & Marine Biology

***FIELD TRIP***
First 5 Wednesdays
3:30 - 5:20 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59139

Fish stocks in oceans around the world have been ravaged by overfishing, and wild caught fish can no longer sustain the growing demand for fish by the Earth’s growing population. The culture of marine fish has the potential to provide an alternate source of seafood. However the culture of marine fish presents many challenges and complete rearing has been achieved for a relatively small number of candidate species. In this seminar, we will look at current approaches to fish mariculture and discuss roadblocks to the introduction of candidate species into food resource programs. Aspects of the developmental and reproductive biology of marine fish critical to culture will be reviewed. The seminar format will allow students to gain hands on experience with marine fish research currently being conducted at UCSB.

Professor Collins’ research examines mechanisms regulating reproduction and development in vertebrates; comparative reproductive endocrinology and fertility; reproductive physiology in teleost fish; endocrine regulation of viviparity; evaluation of candidate species for mariculture; marine teleost larval rearing technology.

collins@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94NX: How Animals See
Professor Gerald Jacobs, Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
2:00 - 2:50 PM
PHELP 1445

Enrollment code: 62406

The suspicion that the visual worlds other animals inhabit may be very different from those we enjoy is of long standing; for example, in 370 BCE, Plato raised the following question: are you quite certain that the several colors appear to a dog or to any animal whatever as they appear to you??  Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in our understanding of the biological machinery that allows various animals to see, of how these diverse capacities allow them to succeed, and of how vision evolved. In this seminar will examine these issues with the goal of providing an appreciation for the enormous variations in visual worlds available across the animal kingdom.  

For many years Dr. Jacobs has conducted a research program that was directed toward understanding vision in a variety of animal species.

jacobs@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94OJ: Climate Justice for Beginners
Professor John Foran, Sociology

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50 a.m.
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59147

This seminar will explore alternative ways to analyze and confront the planetary climate crisis, including how to understand the crisis, the global climate justice movements that are seeking solutions, the prospects of mounting successful climate justice campaigns both in the United States and globally, and strategies for organizing such movements.

John Foran is Professor of Sociology.  His work focuses on climate change, radical social movements, and sustainable alternative futures.  His books include Taking Power:  The Origins of Third World Social Revolutions, and he now works on movements for radical change in the 21st century and the global climate justice movement.

foran@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94OS: Women and Representation
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Tuesdays
12:00-12:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59154

Self-representation, the capability to define oneself and tell one's own story, has been and is one of the most important conquests for women and feminists. This seminar focuses on the issue of self-representation and on the contestation of what femininity means in patriarchy on four novels by women: Charlotte Bronte's ‘Jane Eyre,’ Jean Rhys' ‘Wide Sargasso Sea,’ Edwige Danticat's ‘Breath, Eyes, Memory,’ and Angela Carter's ‘Nights at the Circus.’

Maurizia Boscagli teaches in the English Department and is affiliated with the Program of Comparative Literature and the department of Feminist Studies. She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body, and another on materialism and everyday materiality. She specializes in 20th and 21st century literature and culture, film and photography. In the English Department she teaches classes on gender and modernity, international modernism, femininity and transgression, 20th century urban culture, the everyday, and work and precarity and their representation in literature and film.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94OU: LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater and Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59162

LAUNCH PAD is the new play development program at UCSB's Department of Theater and Dance. With the playwright in residence, we produce a "preview production" of a new play each year. Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development. Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers in class and observe rehearsals to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage.

Risa Brainin, Chair/Director of Performance, directorial credits include plays at Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatre Festival and more. Artistic Director of UCSB's LAUNCH PAD. www.risabrainin.com

rbrainin@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94OZ: The Self
Professor Stan Klein, Psychology

Mondays
1:00-1:50 PM
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59170

Examine what it means to be a self.  Is the self "real" or an illusion?  If the latter, by whom is the illusion had? Will examine a number of clinical cases (amnesia, autism, alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia) to see what happens to one's sense of self when brain mechanisms responsible for aspects of self and self-knowledge are impaired by neural dysfunction.

Dr. Klein is Professor of Psychology with affiliation in philosophy dept.  Interests are memory, self, consciousness, evolution.

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From the Page to the Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 pm
TD-W 1530

Enrollment code: 27151

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes of design and production for theater and dance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction. Her recent work at UCSB includes: THESE SHINING LIVES, ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps} and EURYDICE.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PQ: "I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair”: Love and Desire in Spanish and Latin American Poetry
Professor Silvia Bermúdez, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays
5:00-6:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 27177

In this seminar we will become acquainted with poems of love and/or desire from the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America spanning five centuries. Our aim is to understand how poetic discourse allows for the articulation of the variety of states, feelings and attitudes associated with passionate desire and/or romantic love.

Professor Silvia Bermúdez teaches and researches on Iberian and Latin American Studies. Her current courses and research projects focus on Constitutional Spain, Galician Studies, and Contemporary Spanish pop music. She is currently serving as Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94QP: African gods in New Orleans? Yoruba cosmology in Tarell McCraney's Plays
Professor Christina McMahon, Theater and Dance

Thursdays
4:00 – 4:50 PM
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59188

In Yoruba mythology from West Africa, Ogun is the God of iron. In "The Brothers Size," by African-American playwright Tarell McCraney, Ogun is a poor black mechanic living in New Orleans. After studying the Yoruba gods, we will examine their reincarnation as Black American characters in two plays by McCraney. We will discuss how ancient African cosmologies are put to contemporary use by a celebrated new voice in American playwriting.

Dr. Christina McMahon is a specialist in African, Caribbean, and African-American theatre. Her first book, which is on Portuguese-language theatre festivals, will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2013. Her next research project asks how we can successfully teach and produce Africa-related theatre in the U.S., where notions of Africa often rely on stereotype or exoticism.

McMahon@Theaterdance.UCSB.edu

INT 94QR: Why Do We Believe the Unbelievable?
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
5:00 – 5:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59196

Humans across cultures believe in a variety of phenomena for which there is no established scientific evidence (e.g. ghosts, superstitions, ESP, UFOs, spirits, the afterlife). This seminar will examine the reasons why belief in such phenomena is so widespread, and why some people believe more strongly than others.

Tamsin German is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her work is concerned with the foundations of the human ability to understand the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thought, such as morality and belief in the supernatural.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94QT: Constantine, the First Christian Emperor of Rome
Professor Elizabeth Digeser, History

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59204

This course will explore various aspects of the first Christian emperor: his rise to power during the Great Persecution, his edict of Religious Liberty, his building programs in Rome and Constantinople, and his legacy.

Professor Digeser studies the intersection of religion and philosophy with Roman politics, as well as the process of "conversion" in Late Antiquity. Her latest book, A Threat to Public Piety: Christians, Platonists, and the Great Persecution (Cornell 2012), explores the interactions of Platonist philosophers and Christian theologians in the period leading up to the Great Persecution of AD 303-11. Her new research explores the issue of religious diversity within the Roman empire: when religions appeared in the center from the frontier, when did Romans appropriate them? when did their differences spark violence? Increasingly in her research, Dr. Digester is interested in exploring the relevance of theories of identity formation and cultural entanglement first used by historians to study the southwest US borderlands. 

edepalma@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94QU: Waste
Professor Greg Siegel, Film and Media Studies

***FIELD TRIP***
1st 5 Thursdays
1:00-2:50 pm
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59212

Waste, in modern societies, appears as a nuisance, a problem needing solution. Depending on its form and circumstance, trash is something to be discarded, removed, treated, collected, destroyed, concealed, recycled, managed and above all controlled. From sewage to garbage to e-waste, this course considers the historical, cultural, and technological dimensions of rubbish.

Greg Siegel is an assistant professor in the Department of Film and Media Studies. He teaches courses on media, popular culture, and technology. His book "Forensic Media: Reconstructing Accidents in Accelerated Modernity" is forthcoming Duke University Press.

gsiegel@filmandmedia.ucsb.edu

INT 94QV: The History of War
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Thursdays
11:00-11:50 pm
Location:  check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59220

This course will provide an analysis of the concept of war and how warfare has been utilized throughout the late Middle-Ages-21st century in the struggle for territory and power.

Professor Cortijo specializes in the analysis of religious and ideological discourse in the Early Renaissance and Contemporary European and American culture. He is the author of some 25 books and numerous articles.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94QW: The Environmental Movement in Germany: Why did the German Greens Become the Most Successful Environmental Party in the World?
Professor Harold Marcuse, History

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
Location: check GOLD for details

Enrollment code: 59238

In this seminar we will start by studying how Germans conceived of "nature" from the Romantic period of the early 1800s through industrialization and World War I to the Nazi period. After discussing "How green were the Nazis?" we will investigate the origins of the postwar environmental movement in the 1960s, the founding of the German Green Party in 1979, and its success winning seats in the national parliament in 1983.  What personalities, topics and events contributed to its early success? What problems did it have to overcome before it became part of a national governing coalition from 1998 to 2005? For this period we will examine election posters and speeches, and biographies of prominent individuals to see what made the party able to create a core constituency of voters.

Professor Marcuse specializes in German history, especially the period after World War II. He studies how events in German history affect political culture in the present. One of his long-standing interests has been the history of environmentalism in Germany from the 1800s to the present.

marcuse@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94RA: Higher Education
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Thursdays
12:00-12:50 PM
ELLISON 3814

Enrollment code: 62414

In this course we shall consider the nature of education, with an emphasis upon the study of the humanities in the university.  Is education something more than technical training?  Ought it to be?  What role does it play in the maturation of the student?  How might one justify the study of the humanities in a world driven as ours is by technology and extreme economic competition?  What is the ethical or political significance of education in general and of education in the humanities in particular?  Student evaluation will be based upon quizzes and class participation.

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary philosophy, with an emphasis on political philosophy, though he has also written on film and contemporary American politics.  He has previously taught Freshman Seminars on Existentialism and on Politics and Film.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94RD: UC and YOU: Why are you here? And, where are you anyway? (for students in the Sciences and quantitative Social Sciences)
Professor Allan Stewart-Oaten, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

Tuesdays*
4:00-6:00 pm
BLDG 384, ROOM 101 (modular class next to PSYCH bldg) and McCune Conference Room

*January 14, February 4, February 18, March 4, and March 11

Enrollment code: 62448

Why are you here? What do you want from your university experience? Can you make that experience more meaningful? What is this institution, UC, that you are now a part of - its history and purpose? After this course is over, how do you find out more?  UC and YOU will meet five times in Winter quarter (2014) for two hours. The first and last sessions will be held in class; the other three sessions will be held in the McCune Conference Room at the campus Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (6th floor HSSB).  At the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center experts on UC will discuss with you the purpose of UC and the value of a UC education.

Allan is a statistician interested in display (plots, tables, summaries), analysis, and study design in all fields using data.  He is an Emeritus Prof and a former Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Studies, who helped with problems at all levels - from avoiding dismissal to competing for prestigious scholarships like the Rhodes.

stewart@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94RE: UC and You: Why are you here? And, where are you anyway? (for students in the Arts and Humanities)
Professor Constance Penley, Film and Media Studies

Tuesdays*
4:00-6:00 pm
2135 SSMS and McCune Conference Room

*January 14, February 4, February 18, March 4, and March 11

Enrollment code: 62505

Why are you here? What is this institution that you are now a part of? What is UC?s history and purpose? What do you want from your university experience? How can you make that experience more meaningful? These are some of the questions that this seminar is designed to explore.  UC and YOU will meet five times in Winter quarter (2014) for two hours. The first and last sessions will be held in class; the other three sessions will be held in the McCune Conference Room at the campus Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (6th floor HSSB).  At the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center experts on UC will discuss with you the purpose of UC and the value of a UC education.

Professor Constance Penley's research ranges from the study of popular culture to the avant-garde and from feminist media theory to science and technology studies. Rolling Stone called her "one of the most dangerous professors in America."

penley@filmandmedia.ucsb.edu