Discovery @ UCSB Seminars List - 2013

Note: "Freshman Seminars" were re-named "Exploration Seminars" starting in Fall 2017.

Fall 2013

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes 2013
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Fridays
11:00-12:50 PM
CHEM 1005D

Enrollment code: 58701

In the week of October 7th the 2013 Nobel prizes will be announced. We will find out how one gets nominated and follow the announcements. We will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Analytical Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94ER: Astrobiology - Are We Alone?
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 57398

Curiosity has been looking for evidence that Mars could have supported life. This seminar will explore astrobiology, which is the study and search for past and present life in the universe. The seminar discusses the origin of life, habitable zones, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the future of life.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. He conducts field research in many places around the world collecting evidence of Earth’s early life. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, as well as advanced courses in the Earth sciences

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94ES: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Stephen Poole, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Professor Craig Carlson Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

Fridays
2:00-2:50 pm
Building 387, Room 103

Enrollment code: 26377, Enrollment code: 26385

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Please note: enroll in this course using one of the enrollment codes provided.

Professor Poole is also Vice-Chair of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. His research areas are: molecular genetics of animal development, focusing on genes involved in development of external sense organs. Courses usually taught: INT 94ES; (this freshman seminar) Molecular Genetics II: Eukaryotes, Biochemistry Lab, Sequence Analysis.

Professor Carlson is Vice-Chair of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. Research area: Microbial Oceanography: examining how microbial processes in the open ocean control the larger biogeochemical cycles such as the carbon and nitrogen cycle.  Courses taught include: INT 94ES (this freshman seminar), EEMB 3 of the Intro Bio Series, Processes in aquatic systems, and biological oceanography.

poole@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
9:30-11:20 am
ARTS 2220

Enrollment code: 26393

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Professor Kip Fulbeck a pioneering artist, spoken word performer, author and filmmaker. He has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show, and PBS, and has performed and exhibited in over twenty countries and throughout the U.S. More information is available at: www.redsushi.com.

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

***FIELD TRIP***
Saturday, October 12th
12:00-1:50 pm (classroom instruction – ARTS 2622)
-and-
Saturday, October 19th
8:30-5:20 pm (field trip)

Enrollment code: 26419

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patrons original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings, prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.        

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 4201

Enrollment code: 26450

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot’s fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? we will explore everyday uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper’s main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protect your Brain or Else!
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
3:00-3:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 63289

You are your brain. You don’t exist without it and the better it functions, the happier you will be. The seminar surveys the effects of injuries to the brain, some are subtle; some are devastating. However, many types of brain damage can be avoided. The seminar covers these and other types of brain injuries that you may witness in your friends or family members.

Dr. Revlin studies how different parts of the brain affect how people remember, reason, and decide on things. He has collected a rich set of examples of people, especially university aged students, with damage to different parts of the brain and what they can and cannot do.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94LH: Memory & History in Contemporary Spanish Literature & Film
Professor Silvia Bermúdez, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays
3:00-4:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 57554

We will examine how contemporary Spanish authors and filmmakers have assessed the political and historical events of the past 100 years.

Professor Bermúdez’ areas of research and teaching are Contemporary Iberian and Latin American Studies. She is currently working on a book on migration and border crossing in contemporary Spanish music and literature.

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94OC: Measuring Meaning
Professor John Mohr, Sociology

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 pm
HSSB 4201

Enrollment code: 26518

We usually think of the sciences as being concerned with identifying patterns and structures using formal (quantitative) tools while we think of the humanities as being concerned with interpreting the human and existential qualities of cultural meanings; but it also possible to use formal quantitative methods to interpret meanings. This seminar reviews some of the contemporary work on measuring meaning. Most of the examples come will come from sociology, but work in other disciplines (anthropology, psychology, linguistics) will also be discussed.

Professor in the Department of Sociology at UCSB, Dr. Mohr’s research has focused on understanding how to use formal methods for analyzing meaning systems. In particular he has studied the history of the welfare state, affirmative action and more recently rhetorics of power in National Security.

mohr@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94OV: Introduction to Sustainability
Professor Eric Matthys, Mechanical Engineering

Tuesdays
9:30-10:20 am
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 26526

This seminar will provide an opportunity for a broad introduction to several Sustainability-related topics.  This will be done in an informal discussion format, with ample interactions between students, invited speakers and the Instructor.   We will discuss areas such as Energy, Transportation, Climate, Water, Food, Agriculture, Buildings etc, both locally, nationally, and globally.  The students will be familiarized with student campus groups and given the opportunity to be involved in their activities.  The discussions will be at a very general level and not very technical.  The seminar will consist primarily of informal discussions in class, some writing activities, and possibly local or campus field trips if logistics allow.

Professor Matthys has taught Energy classes and conducted research in Energy Engineering areas for most of his career.  He is currently involved in various activities regarding Sustainability at UCSB, both on the academic and administrative sides, and is working with campus student groups on several sustainability-related initiatives.  He is working on developing new solar thermal energy and biofuels technologies.

matthys@engineering.ucsb.edu

INT 94OZ: The Self
Professor Stan Klein, Psychology

Mondays
1:00-1:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 57562

Examine what it means to be a self.  Is the self "real" or an illusion?  If the latter, by whom is the illusion had? Will examine a number of clinical cases (amnesia, autism, alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia) to see what happens to one's sense of self when brain mechanisms responsible for aspects of self and self-knowledge are impaired by neural dysfunction.

Professor of Psychology, Dr Klein’s interests are memory, self, consciousness, evolution.

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94PM: The Making of the State: Terrorism and State Terrorism in Europe
Professor Viola Miglio, Spanish and Portuguese

***1-DAY SEMINAR***
Friday, October 4th
8:00-12:50 pm
-and-
2:00-6:50 pm

Enrollment code: 57570

This seminar will offer students the chance to get a global view of the origins of terrorism in the process of organization of the European states. We will be studying documents and laws to trace the origin of terrorism and state-organized repression (state terrorism) in Europe. We will also look at politics in the Basque Country and Basque institutional organization, and articulate characteristics unique to Basque politics. Finally we will also discuss major problems facing European minority politics.

Professor Viola Miglio’s main interests are minority languages and legal rights, language change and translation. She works on Romance languages (Spanish, Northern Italian dialects), Basque and on Icelandic language, literature and history. She is about to publish a book on Basque whaling in Iceland in the 17th century with Professor Xabier Irujo (University of Nevada, Reno).This seminar will be co-taught with Professor Irujo.

miglio@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Mary Hegarty, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Wednesdays
4:00-4:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 26542

Explore spatial reasoning for problem solving (sciences), creative expression (arts), and interpretation (humanities). Learn how statistics, graphs, maps, and virtual reality aid learning, analysis, data visualization, discovery/solutions to socio-environmental problems, and space/place interpretation. Professors Hegarty and Montello will be joined by visiting professors from the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, and engineering to illustrate how spatial tools are used to integrate knowledge across disciplines.  Co-Teaching with Dan Montello – Geography.

Mary Hegarty is a Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, She investigates spatial cognition and the uses of diagrammatic reasoning for problem solving and has researched the role and effectiveness of spatial representations in understanding mechanical systems and meteorological phenomena, and for the training of medical doctors.  Daniel Montello, Professor in the Department of Geography, is interested in the spatial aspects of social behavior; environmental psychology, and behavioral geography. His research spans problems in the perception of human-environmental relationships, geographic information science, and the design and use of maps.  Donald Janelle, Researcher in Spatial Studies, investigates how transportation, communication, and information relate to human activity behavior.

hegarty@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From the Page to the Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 pm
TD-W 1530

Enrollment code: 26559

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes of design and production for theater and dance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction. Her recent work at UCSB includes: THESE SHINING LIVES, ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps} and EURYDICE.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PX: Preparation for Admission to Schools of the Health Professions
Dr. Stephen Blain, College of Letters and Science

Tuesdays
3:30-4:20 pm
LSB 1101

Enrollment code: 26609

This series of seminars is designed to expose incoming students to the academic and non-academic prerequisites necessary for admission to schools of the various health professions to enable the student to complete all of the requirements in a timely manner.  In addition to course requirements and academic performance, additional topics will include research, internships, admissions testing, letters of recommendation and interviews.

Dr. Blain is a clinical Professor Emeritus from UCLA and Professor Emeritus on recall at UCSB. He is a pediatric dentist and former Associate Dean of Admission, Student Affairs and Financial Aid at the UCLA School of Dentistry and chair of the admissions committee and counsels students in the L&S Advising Office.

sblain@ltsc.ucsb.edu

INT 94QI: Existentialism
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Mondays
12:00-12:50 pm
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 57588

Existentialism is one of the most important and influential philosophical movements of the 19th and 20th centuries.  It is centrally concerned with questions concerning the meaning of life in a world in which there are no fixed and authoritative guidelines for human action.  In this course we shall read selections from the most prominent authors associated with this movement, including Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus.  Student evaluation will be based upon quizzes and class participation.

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary political philosophy, though he has also written on film, contemporary American politics, and Heidegger.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94QJ: Work and Laziness
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Thursdays
10:00-10:50 am
SH 2635

Enrollment code: 57596

Is it better to work or to be lazy? What is at stake in each choice? Have people always been asked to be productive and self-disciplined or is the work ethic a modern concept? Can one consume without producing? We will address these questions by studying the idea of the work ethic and of the "right to be lazy" in modern 20th century novels: Joseph Conrad's ‘Heart of Darkness,’ Emile Zola's ‘Ladies' Paradise,’ Oscar Wilde's ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray,’ and Georges Perec's ‘Things.’

Maurizia Boscagli teaches in the English Department and is affiliated with the Program of Comparative Literature and with Feminist Studies. She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body, and another on materialism and the materiality of everyday life. She specializes in 20th and 21st century literature and culture, film and photography. In the English Department she teaches classes on gender and modernity, international modernism, femininity and trangression, 20th century urban literature and culture, the everyday, and work and precarity and their representation in film and literature.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94QK: Samurai and Violence
Professor Luke Roberts, History

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 57604

In this course we will explore the place of violence in the lives of the samurai class of Japan.  They were warriors who trained for violence, but also were under many civil restraints concerning when and where it could be used.  The character of their violence and of these restraints changed drastically over time, such that a samurai of 1200 would hardly have recognized a samurai of 1700, and we will learn why.

Luke Roberts is a historian of Japan who specializes in the history between 1550 and 1880.  He has written a book on the economy and politics of samurai domain of Tosa, and another on samurai governmental culture.  He is currently writing a biography of an eighteenth century samurai as a form of social history.

lukerobt@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94QL: Literature and Intensity
Professor Enda Duffy, English

Tuesdays
12:00-12:50 pm
PHELPS 1445

Enrollment code: 57612

Has a book, a poem, or film ever moved you profoundly?  If so why?  What makes a piece of literature, or any work of culture--a song, a film, a performance--moving?  What does 'to be moved' mean?  This seminar will examine this question by looking at poems, stories, paintings, songs and other or artworks which have moved participants, to understand what makes that work great.  Works by Shakespeare, John Keats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and others of your choice.

Professor Enda Duffy is the author of ‘The Speed Handbook,’ on velocity in the modern era, and ‘The Subaltern Ulysses,’ a book on James Joyce and nationalism.  He teaches and writes about twentieth-century and contemporary literature, culture and critical theory.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94QM: Is There a God?
Professor C. Anthony Anderson, Philosophy

Wednesdays (new day)
1:00-1:50 pm
SH 5617 (new location)

Enrollment code: 57620

We will discuss the best arguments (according to current consensus) for and against the existence of God.  Most students entering the university have made up their minds about whether or not there is a God. Their initial beliefs are strongly influenced by the beliefs of their parents and friends. Sometimes as a result of interaction with other students (and faculty) at the university they change their minds.  But the initial beliefs and the changed beliefs are rarely supported by good reasons - that is, by the best empirical and logical evidence for and against.  The most reasonable belief on this matter is one of the most important questions one has to decide.  In this course we will consider the best reasons on both sides of the question.

C. Anthony Anderson is a professor in the Department of Philosophy who specializes in logic and the philosophy of religion.  During 2010-2011 he was at the University of Oxford on a Templeton Fellowship working on a book about the ontological argument for the existence of God.  Most of his publications have been in the area of intentional logic (the logic such concepts as necessity, knowledge, belief, and the like.

caanders@philosophy.ucsb.edu

INT 94QN: Queer Ethnicities: Walking the Lines of Difference
Professor Leo Cabranes-Grant, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
4:00-4:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 57638

Which are the links between desire and ethnicity? How are queer identities inflected by a sense of belonging to a particular cultural community? Our Seminar will explore these and other related questions through a close reading of two short story collections centered in Jewish- American (Daniel Jaffe, "Jewish Gentle and Other Stories of Gay-Jewish Living") and African-American (Guy Mark Foster, "The Rest of Us") experiences. The students will write short reaction journals and participate in group discussions.

Leo Cabranes-Grant teaches Intercultural relations and performance theater. He is also an award winner scholar and playwright.

LeoCabranes@aol.com

INT 94QO: In Search of the Truth: Science versus Religion
Professor John Lew, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Wednesdays
6:00-6:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 57646

One of the most highly charged controversies and deepest divides in Western culture is that between the academic left versus the religious right.  Both proclaim a strong passion in search of the truth, yet rarely can either side come to discuss, let alone appreciate, the others views.  We will discuss what the major issues are, and how we may come to be agents of reconciliation.

Dr. Lew is Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at UCSB.  His field of research is Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and development of novel bio-technologies.  His passion is graduate and undergraduate teaching and mentorship. He has a personal interest in controversies surrounding science and religion.

john.lew@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94QQ: Russian Animated Films
Professor Sara Weld, Germanic, Slavic & Semitic Studies

Wednesdays
10:00-10:50 am
PHELPS 1444

Enrollment code: 57653

Characterized by astonishing craftsmanship and profound moral allegory, Russian animated film elevates animation to the highest levels of its form. In this course we screen and discuss a variety of short films by significant Russian directors, including the legendary Yuri Norstein, as we place them in cultural context and pinpoint the unique aspects of Russian animation and of the animated film as an art form.

Sara Pankenier Weld teaches course on Russian literature and culture, comparative literature, and children's literature in the Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies Department and in the Comparative Literature Program. Her interests include nineteenth and twentieth-century Russian literature, culture, and art, as well as Scandinavian literature, comparative literature, word and image, visuality, childhood, and children’s literature. She got her Ph.D. from Stanford University and came to UCSB from Bard College in 2012.

sweld@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94QR: Why Do We Believe the Unbelievable?
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
5:00-5:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 57661

Humans across cultures believe in a variety of phenomena for which there is no established scientific evidence (e.g. ghosts, superstitions, ESP, UFOs, spirits, the afterlife). This seminar will examine the reasons why belief in such phenomena is so widespread, and why some people believe more strongly than others.

Tamsin German is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her work is concerned with the foundations of the human ability to understand the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thought, such as morality and belief in the supernatural.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94QS: Eating for Earth: Our Diets and Global Climate Change
Professor David Cleveland, Environmental Studies

5 Tuesdays
October 8th, 15th, 22nd, 29th and November 5th
3:00-4:50 pm
BREN 4016

Enrollment code: 57679

This seminar explores the relationship between our food choices and global climate change by answering the questions: What determines the greenhouse gas emissions of our food? How can we make informed food choices that minimize greenhouse gas emissions? How can we encourage changes in attitudes, behaviors and policies to support more climate friendly food choices? What are other effects will change to a more climate friendly diet have? The seminar will include field trips to nearby agrifood sites. There will be discussion of assigned readings and written assignments.

David Cleveland is a human ecologist who has done research and development project work on sustainable agrifood systems with small-scale farmers and gardeners around the world. His current research and teaching includes a focus on the relationships among localized agrifood systems, diet and nutrition, and climate change in Santa Barbara County.

cleveland@es.ucsb.edu

Spring 2013

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94ER: From Darwin to Mars and Beyond
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Thursdays
4:00-4:50pm
PSB-S 2721

Enrollment code: 54809

Are we alone in the universe? Or, has life emerged on other planets, such as Mars, or on moons? This seminar will explore the field of astrobiology. Astrobiology is the study and search for life, past and present, in the universe. We will discuss topics such as the origin of life, early life on Earth, the search for extraterrestrial intelligent life, and the future of life on Earth.

Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science, is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. He has taught several Freshman Seminars, History of Life, Historical Geology, as well as advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94FH: Film and Disability: Stereotyping and Recent Break-Out Films
Professor George Singer, Education

1st 5 Thursdays
9:00-10:50am
Consult GOLD for location and course enrollment code

Film has been a powerful vehicle for expressing and transmitting stereotypical views of people with disabilities just as it has been a vehicle for transmitting racism, and stereotypical gender roles. In this seminar students will watch and discuss films which express traditional prejudices about people with disabilities. The impact of the disability rights movement will be examined through contemporary films which have broken out of the traditional mold.  Students will discuss their own experience and views of disability and will discuss the way films have contributed to them. 

I have been a Professor in the Givertz Graduate School of Education since 1995. I earned my PhD in Special Education in 1985 and subsequently worked as a Research Scientist at the Oregon Research Institute until 1991. From 1991- 1995 I directed the Hood Center for Family Support at the Dartmouth Medical School. My research interests have focused on families of children with severe disabilities and on special education instructional interventions for children with severe disabilities. I have also taught graduate seminars on the history of disability in the West and on disability as it has been portrayed historically in art and film. I have taught a freshman seminar on film and disability studies for several years.

singer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

First 5 Tuesdays
9:30-11:20am
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25510

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Professor Kip Fulbeck a pioneering artist, spoken word performer, author and filmmaker.  He has been featured on CNN, MTV, The Today Show, and PBS; and has performed and exhibited in over 20 countries and throughout the U.S.
More information is available at:  www.redsushi.com

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

***FIELD TRIP***
Saturday, April 13th
12:00-1:50pm (classroom instruction)
PHELPS 3530
and
Saturday, April 20th
8:30-5:20pm (field trip)

Enrollment code: 54817

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patrons original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings, prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance

Wednesdays
5:00-5:50 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25536

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in  dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual  collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008).

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JG: Death, Revenge and Madness in Icelandic Literature and Culture
Professor Viola Miglio, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Fridays
2:00-4:20 PM
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25544

Tragic events are the pivots around which the fascinating and little known Icelandic literary tradition weaves its masterpieces. This course intends to show how these themes evolve from the Middle Ages to the present and how they relate to the culture of one of Europe's peripheries, by analyzing Iceland's most significant prose and poetry through the filmed versions of these literary masterpieces.

Professor Viola Miglio’s main interests are minority languages and legal rights, language change and translation. She works on Romance languages (Spanish, Northern Italian dialects), Basque and on Icelandic language, literature and history. She is about to publish a book on Basque whaling in Iceland in the 17th century with Professor Xabier Irujo (University of Nevada, Reno). This seminar will be co-taught with Professor Irujo.

miglio@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protect Your Brain or Else!
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Mondays
3:00-3:50 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25577

You are your brain. You don’t exist without it and the better it functions, the happier you will be. The seminar surveys the effects of injuries to the brain, some are subtle; some are devastating. However, many types of brain damage can be avoided. The seminar covers these and other types of brain injuries that you may witness in your friends or family members.

Dr. Revlin studies how different parts of the brain affect how people remember, reason, and decide on things. He has collected a rich set of examples of people with damage to different parts of the brain and what they can and cannot do.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94LV: Biotechnology and Society
Professor Douglas Thrower, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Thursdays
12:00-12:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 64790

This course will focus on recent developments in the field of biotechnology and their impact on human society.  Topics will include: why drugs cost so much, genetically altered foods, stem cells, cloning, genetic profiling, and DNA & the Law (forensic science).

Professor Thrower a lecturer in the department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology.  He teaches undergraduate courses in genetics, pharmacology, and cancer biology.  His research interest is in the area of microtubule-targeted drugs that are used to treat cancer.

thrower@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94MZ: Risk and Resilience in Families
Professor Tamara Afifi, Communication

Tuesdays
9:30-10:20 am
SSMS 1009

Enrollment code: 25643

This seminar focuses on the communication patterns in families that place family members at risk for difficulties and the communication patterns that make them resilient or stronger when faced with difficult circumstances or stressful situations.  In particular, we will discuss communication patterns in divorced families, stress and coping, parenting, conflict, strong marriages/families, addictions, and adolescence.

Tamara Afifi is a Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Most of her research focuses on how family members cope communicatively with various challenges they face.  When examining her research program, two primary themes emerge:  (1) information regulation (privacy, secrets, disclosure, avoidance) in parent-child and dating relationships, and (2) communication processes related to uncertainty, loss, stress and coping in families, with particular emphasis on post-divorce families.  Her current research examines the impact of parents’ conflict and other communication skills on adolescents’ physiological responses.

tafifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94NT: Screen Classics
Professor Dorota Dutsch, Classics

Thursdays
5:00-550 pm
GIRV 1108
 
 

Enrollment code: 68379

This class examines several recent films dealing with classical subjects, both mythological and historical, which have been produced in the last fifteen years. We will view the Gladiator (2000), Troy (2004), 300 (2010), The Eagle (2011), and Coriolanus (2011) and ask what social trends may be behind this renaissance of interest in classics; we will also attempt to find the generic patterns evinced by these films, whose target audiences range from children to adult audiences with taste for violent and explicitly sexual material. Our goal in noting tendencies and generic patterns will be to identify the role that the classical past has come to play in popular culture.

Dorota  Dutsch's research focuses on social performance (comprising anything from comedy to funeral rites). She has published articles on Plautine jokes, vampire mice, pharmacology of seduction, the language of gesture, illustrations of Carolingian manuscripts, and reception of ancient drama.

ddutsch@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays
1:00-2:50 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 25668

This seminar will focus on film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino historical experience including immigration, civil rights, education, and culture. Students will screen one documentary per week for one hour and then discuss the film for the second hour.

Mario Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies.  He has written numerous books on the Chicano experiences including on immigration, civil rights, identity, and religion. He teaches courses on Chicano history, 20th century U.S. history, autobiography and history, and literature and history.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94OS: Women and Representation
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
SH 2617

Enrollment code: 54833

Representation, the capability to speak for oneself, to affirm and define one's identity, has been, and is, crucial for women and for feminist critics and activists. This seminar focuses on the concept of representation as an aesthetic and political act, and looks at how the work of women cultural producers (writers, poets, film makers) tries to reappropriate the power to define women and femininity. Texts by Charlotte Bronte, Angela Carter, Virginia Woolf; cinema by Jane Campion.

Maurizia Boscagli is Associate professor of English, Comparative Literature,and Feminist studies at UCSB. Her research interest include Twentieth and Twenty-First century literature and culture, film, and photography; feminist and critical theory, gender and sexualities. She has written on modernity and masculinity, affect and gender, modernism, materialism and new materialities, and more, recently, on work and precarity.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94OT: Democratizing Gender: Reconstructions of Masculinity & Femininity in the 21st Century
Professor Edwina Barvosa, Chicana & Chicano Studies, Feminist Studies

Thursdays
1st 6 wks
2:00 - 3:50 pm
SH 1623

Enrollment code: 65573

This seminar explores the interconnection between two major concepts: democratization and gender. In different ways, both concepts remain deeply debated today. Here we will explore these debates, and consider whether old and new gender inequities might be addressed through democratizing social practices that potentially reshape our sense of gender relations.

Edwina Barvosa is a political scientist specializing in social and political theory, and racial, ethnic and gender studies. She earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her M.A. from Cambridge University. Her gender research focuses on how gender inequities affecting both men and woman can be addressed though social reconstructions.

barvosa@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94PL: What is Computing?
Professor Tevfik Bultan, Computer Science

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50 am
Consult GOLD for location and course enrollment code

Computer technology has produced many impressive gadgets that surround us every day. However, foundations of computing are still a mystery to many. The purpose of this seminar is to discuss what computing is, and help students gain an insight into the essence of computing and its future potential.

Professor Bultan conducts research on improving the dependability of computer systems, focusing particularly on software dependability. He believes that software development should and could be easier and less error prone.

bultan@cs.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: Introduction to Collaboration for the Theater
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 pm
TD-W 1530

Enrollment code: 54841

This seminar will follow the step-by-step process of artistic collaboration for the Theater as connected to a Department of Theater and Dance main stage production. 
 

Professor Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: HAMLET and TARTUFFE.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PV: Statistics in Environmental and Ecological Research
Professor Wendy Meiring, Statistics and Applied Probability

Mondays
5:30 – 6:20 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 54858

Each week we will discuss a specific environmental/ecological question, and the role of statistics in related research. Example questions include: "How many whales live in the oceans?" and "How are stratospheric ozone levels changing over time?" Interest and active participation in focused class discussion/brainstorming is all that is required!

Wendy Meiring is an applied statistician who studies environmental and ecological processes. Following her Ph.D. in Statistics at the University of Washington, Seattle, she was a postdoc at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.  She then moved to UCSB, where she is an Associate Professor.

meiring@pstat.ucsb.edu

INT 94PW: Human Memory
Professor Stan Klein, Psychology

Mondays
1:00-1:50 pm
HSSB 1237

Enrollment code: 64782

We will discuss the nature of memory and then what makes memory, generally construed, human memory.  We will cover amnesia, dementia, pathological memory in schizophrenia as well as the opposite -- that is, individuals who have exceptional memory abilities.

Dr. Klein is Professor of Psychology with affiliate appointment in Philosophy.  He received his BA from Stanford and PhD from Harvard and has been at UCSB in Psychology (cognitive, social and evolutionary) since 1990.

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94PZ: The Western Discovery of Buddhism
Professor Fabio Rambelli, East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, Religious Studies

Mondays
1:00-1:50 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 54866

This seminar traces the surprising ways in which Buddhism came to known in the Western world, from ancient Greece and Rome to contemporary America, through the activities of travelers, missionaries, merchants, soldiers, artists, and philosophers.

Professor Fabio Rambelli teaches courses on Japanese religion, Shinto, and cultural aspects of Buddhism. He is particularly interested in cross-cultural dynamics of Buddhism. He is currently working on the cultural imagination of India in premodern Japan

rambelli@eastasian.ucsb.edu

INT 94QA: Roman Imperial Women
Professor Elizabeth Digeser, History

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50 am
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 54874

This seminar will explore the careers of a number of Roman empresses from the first through the sixth centuries CE. Although Roman women were not supposed to play a public political role, the careers of Livia, Julia Domna, Pulcheria and Theodora show clearly that they did not always work behind the scenes. Assignments will include reading and weekly discussion.

Professor Digeser teaches the history of ancient Rome, and her own research explores politics and religion in the Empire from the third to fifth centuries.

edepalma@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94QB: Imaging and Imagining Sea Level Rise
Professor Janet Walker, Film & Media Studies

1st 6 Tuesdays
3:30-5:10 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 54882

How do different communities from the populations of sinking islands to the residents of coastal California experience, visually represent, and respond to sea level rise?  In conjunction with this year's Critical Issues in America theme of sea level rise, students will meet as a group and attend film screenings, guest lectures, and other special events.

Professor of Film and Media Studies and co-convener of the Environmental Media Initiative Research Group of the Carsey-Wolf Center, Janet Walker is author or editor of numerous books and articles about documentary film, trauma studies, and environmental media.  She loves teaching Films of the Natural and Human Environment.

jwalker@filmandmedia.ucsb.edu

INT 94QC: Politics and Film
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Tuesdays
12:00-12:50 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 54890

In this course we shall discuss ten films, each of which has a strong political theme. As our class time is very limited, students will watch these films each week at home. Student evaluation will be based upon quizzes, short viewer-response analyses, and class participation.

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary political philosophy, though he has also written on film and on contemporary American politics.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94QD: Studying Abroad
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
1:00-1:50 pm
Consult GOLD for location

Enrollment code: 54908

This course is concerned with a variety of topics related to undergraduate studying abroad:  program opportunities, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, overcoming challenges, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus work on a project focusing on study abroad's connection with their majors.

Juan E. Campo is Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, he has served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

jcampo@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94QE: Mono Lake, Owens Valley and LA’s Water Supply
Professor Jordan Clark, Environmental Studies

***3-DAY FIELD TRIP***
The instructor will contact students for a pre-trip organizational meeting.
Friday, May 10th – Sunday, May 12th

Enrollment code: 54916

This seminar will introduce the history of the LA water supply starting with the construction of the LA Aqueduct, followed by a discussion of the Mono Lake ‘public trust’ court case and efforts to increase water reuse in the basin.  The class will include a 3-day field trip (Early Friday to Late Sunday) to Mono Basin to exam the aqueduct and tour Mono Lake.  We will stay at the UC reserve station, SNARL.

The class will be jointly offered with Bob Wilkinson (wilkinson@es.ucsb.edu) also from the Program of Environmental Studies.  We both are faculty in the program and have been teaching there for more than a decade and specialize is hydrology and water policy.

jfclark@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94QH: Global Warming, a Hoax or a Disaster?
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Fridays
11:00-12:50 pm
CHEM 1005D

Enrollment code: 60848

The number of Americans who worry about global warming has gone down in the last ten years from 75% to about 50%. Is there less to worry about? What really is the science of climate change? Are the skeptics right? We will explore both the science and the politics of what may (or may not be) the greatest crisis facing planet earth.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Analytical Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu