Discovery @ UCSB Seminars List - 2012

Note: "Freshman Seminars" were re-named "Exploration Seminars" starting in Fall 2017.

Fall 2012

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94ES: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Stephen Poole, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Professor Craig Carlson, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

Fridays
2:00-2:50pm
Bldg. 387, Room 103
 

Enrollment code: 25726, Enrollment code: 25734

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Professor Poole is Vice-Chair of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. Research area: molecular genetics of animal development, focusing on genes involved in development of external sense organs. Courses usually taught: INT 94ES (this freshman seminar), Molecular Genetics II: Eukaryotes, Biochemistry Lab, Sequence Analysis.

Professor Carlson is Vice-Chair of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. Research area: Microbial Oceanography: examining how microbial processes in the open ocean control the larger biogeochemical cycles such as the carbon and nitrogen cycle.  Courses taught include: INT 94ES (this freshman seminar), EEMB 3 of the Intro Bio Series, Processes in aquatic systems, and biological oceanography.

poole@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

First 5 Tuesdays
9:00-10:50am
Bldg 479, Room 1211

Enrollment code: 25742

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Professor Kip Fulbeck a pioneering artist, spoken word performer, author and filmmaker. He has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show, and PBS, and has performed and exhibited in over twenty countries and throughout the U.S. More information is available at: www.redsushi.com.

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

First 5 Tuesdays
1:00-2:50pm
HSSB 3202
 

Enrollment code: 55988

This seminar will focus on contemporary political issues both nationally and internationally and attempt to provide a broader historical context and perspective to such issues. The U.S. presidential election in Fall 2012 will be of special attention of the seminar. Students will be required to propose each week a topic to everyone to discuss that is relevant to the seminar.

Mario Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies. He has written numerous books on Chicano history including on immigration, civil rights, identity, and religion. He teaches courses on Chicano history, 20th century U.S. history, autobiography and history, and literature and history.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Adams, History of Art and Architecture

Saturday, October 20, 10:00-11:50 am;
and Saturday, October 27, 8:30-5:20 pm
PHELP3530 – location of first class meeting
* FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 25767

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patrons original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94IE: The Long Freedom Movement and Afro-Asian Solidarities: Richard Aoki, Black Panthers, and Asian American Activism
Professor Diane Fujino, Asian American Studies

First 5 Wednesdays
9:00-10:50am
HSSB 5024
 

Enrollment code: 53165

Explore the life of Richard Aoki, a Japanese American leader of the Black Panther Party, Third World strike at Berkeley, and early Asian American Movement.  Examine historical forces, WWII concentration camps, Cold War masculinity, 1960s activism, connecting activism across time.  Study the construction of narrative stories and interpretive history.

Diane Fujino is a leading scholar of Asian American activism and Afro-Asian solidarities. Her book, Heartbeat of Struggle, studies the legendary Japanese American activist, Yuri Kochiyama, who worked with Malcolm X in Harlem. This seminar centers on her latest book, Samurai among Panther, on Aoki’s life in Oakland.

fujino@asamst.ucsb.edu

INT 94IX: Playwriting for the Stage
Professor Carlos Morton, Theater & Dance

Every other Friday, 12:00-1:50 pm (5 sessions every other week):
September 28
October 12 and 26
November 9 and 30
GIRV 2135
* FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 25783

To encourage writing for the stage exploring plot, character, theme, style, and spectacle. Students will write a 15 minute play. Scenes will be read in class and students are expected to assist each other in the readings.

Carlos Morton is a published playwright whose works have been produced by the New York Shakespeare's Public Theatre, Denver Center Theater, and Arizona Theatre Company.

cmorton@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

First 4 Wednesdays
2:00-4:20pm
HSSB 1223

Enrollment code: 55996

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing primarily on Mexico and Argentina. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the aftermath of dictatorships, and the effects of civil war. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?  We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Professor McCracken specializes in Latin American literature and cultural studies, and U.S. Latino literature.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50pm
HSSB 4201

Enrollment code: 56002

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot’s fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe?  Want to win the lottery? we will explore everyday uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

The instructor's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protect Your Brain or Else!
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Mondays
3:00-3:50pm
NH1111

Enrollment code: 64261

You are your brain. You don’t exist without it and the better it functions, the happier you will be. The seminar surveys the effects of injuries to the brain, some are subtle; some are devastating. However, many types of brain damage can be avoided. The seminar covers these and other types of brain injuries that you may witness in your friends or family members.

Dr. Revlin studies how different parts of the brain affect how people remember, reason, and decide on things. He has collected a rich set of examples of people with damage to different parts of the brain and what they can and cannot do.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94LY: Modernist Architecture in L.A.
Professor Sven Spieker, Germanic, Slavic & Semitic Studies

Friday, October 26, 2012, 11:00-12:50 pm, and
Saturday, October 27, 2012, 9:00-3:50 pm
HSSB 1173

Enrollment code: 62398

The seminar meets on two days. On the first day, we will begin with a slide-assisted examination of early to mid-20th-century domestic architure in Europe and the United States. Then, we will assess some buildings on the UCSB campus for their "modernist" elements. On the second day, the focus of our interest will be buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolf Schindler, and Richard Neutra, all of whom were active in L.A. in the first half of the 20th century. We will learn about the economics and the design of early 20th-century homes, and about the history of their preservation. Time will be spent at the Schindler archive at UCSB where much of the famous architect's archive is preserved. The students will learn what role archives such as this one can play when it comes to preserving architecture. They will also be able to interact with some more unique materials preserved on our campus. We will visit the Schindler home in West Hollywood, as well as Wright's Hollyhock house in Hollywood, and Richard Neutra's VDL research house. We will study our buildings and learn about their design, history of their preservation, and current uses. I hope to be able to involve and official from L.A.'s municipal preservation agency in the hopes that he/or she meet with us briefly. I plan to give the students group assignments that lets them search the buildings we visit for specifically "modernist" elements.

Professor Sven Spieker teaches in the Comparative Literature Program; the Department of Art and Art History; and the Department of Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He specializes in European modernism, with an emphasis on the Eastern European avant-gardes, contemporary art with an emphasis on Eastern Europe and critical theory. Professor Spieker has published on topics ranging from the Russian avant-garde (Malevich, Rodchenko, Dziga Vertov) to late 20th-century art and aesthetics. His essays and articles have appeared in German, Russian, Swedish, Polish and English. Professor Spieker has organized several international conferences most recently, The Office in the Studio: The Administration of Modernism at the University of Jena, Germany. His latest book publication focused on the archive as a crucible of European modernism (The Big Archive, MIT Press, 2008). Professor Spieker is the editor of ARTMargins and ARTMargins Online(www.artmargins.com).

spieker@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Friday
12:00-12:50 pm
Chemistry 1005D

Enrollment code: 25841

A Gallup Poll shows that 44% of Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Should we worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternate medicine just quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say? Explore the history and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted. We will also follow the Nobel prizes, which will be announced during this quarter.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Analytical Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94MZ: Risk and Resilience in Families
Professor Tamara Afifi, Communication

Tuesdays
9:30-10:20pm
SS&MS 1009

Enrollment code: 64246

This seminar focuses on the communication patterns in families that place family members at risk for difficulties and the communication patterns that make them resilient or stronger when faced with difficult circumstances or stressful situations.  In particular, we will discuss communication patterns in divorced families, stress and coping, parenting, conflict, strong marriages/families, addictions, and adolescence.

Tamara Afifi is a Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Most of her research focuses on how family members cope communicatively with various challenges they face.  When examining her research program, two primary themes emerge:  (1) information regulation (privacy, secrets, disclosure, avoidance) in parent-child and dating relationships, and (2) communication processes related to uncertainty, loss, stress and coping in families, with particular emphasis on post-divorce families.  Her current research examines the impact of parents’ conflict and other communication skills on adolescents’ physiological responses.

tafifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94NE: Marine Fish Culture
Professor Peter Collins, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

First 5 Wednesdays
3:30-5:20pm
GIRV 1108
* LAB EXPERIENCE

Enrollment code: 25866

Fish stocks in oceans around the world have been ravaged by overfishing, and wild caught fish can no longer sustain the growing demand for fish by the Earth’s growing population. The culture of marine fish has the potential to provide an alternate source of seafood. However the culture of marine fish presents many challenges and complete rearing has been achieved for a relatively small number of candidate species. In this seminar, we will look at current approaches to fish mariculture and discuss roadblocks to the introduction of candidate species into food resource programs. Aspects of the developmental and reproductive biology of marine fish critical to culture will be reviewed. The seminar format will allow students to gain hands on experience with marine fish research currently being conducted at UCSB.

Professor Collins’ research examines mechanisms regulating reproduction and development in vertebrates; comparative reproductive endocrinology and fertility; reproductive physiology in teleost fish; endocrine regulation of viviparity; evaluation of candidate species for mariculture; marine teleost larval rearing technology.

collins@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94OC: Measuring Meaning
Professor John Mohr, Sociology

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 pm
HSSB 4201
* LAB EXPERIENCE

Enrollment code: 25882

We usually think of the sciences as being concerned with identifying patterns and structures using formal (quantitative) tools while we think of the humanities as being concerned with interpreting the human and existential qualities of cultural meanings. But it also possible to use formal quantitative methods to interpret meanings. This seminar reviews some of the contemporary work on measuring meaning. Most of the examples come will come from sociology, but work in other disciplines (anthropology, psychology, linguistics) will also be discussed.

I am a Professor in the Department of Sociology at UCSB. My research has focused on understanding how we can use formal methods for analyzing meaning systems.  In particular I have studied the history of the welfare state, affirmative action and more recently rhetorics of power in National Security.

mohr@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94OV: Introduction to Sustainability
Professor Eric Matthys, Mechanical Engineering

Tuesdays
1:00-1:50pm
HSSB 4201

Enrollment code: 56069

This seminar will introduce students to the many Sustainability-related activities on campus and in the surrounding community.  We will have invited speakers from various organizations to discuss their activities and the general theme of Sustainability in many of its aspects, including Energy, Waste, Water, Food, Land use, Efficiency, Outreach, Transportation, etc.

Professor Matthys is currently the UCSB Sustainability Champion.  He has taught and conducted research on Energy and Sustainability for many years both in the College of Engineering and through Freshman Seminars.

matthys@engineering.ucsb.edu

INT 94PF: Tales of the City
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Tuesdays
3:30-4:20pm
LSB 1101
 

Enrollment code: 56010

The city is the key space of modernity, at the same time a place of excitement and narcosis, crowds and solitude.  In this seminar we will read texts that represent the city and urban experience in all its complexity and contradictions. The readings include texts by Edgar Allan Poe, Jean Rhys, Emile Zola, Virginia Woolf, Raymond Carver. Through the readings we will discuss the figure of the flaneur, the spectacle, consumerism, and the presence of women in public space.

Maurizia Boscagli is Associate Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and Feminist Studies at UCSB. Her research interests include Twentieth and Twentiey-First century literature and culture, film and photography; feminist and critical theory, gender and sexualities. She is the author of a book on modernity and masculinity, (The Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century), the translator of Antonio Negri's book of political theory Insurgencies). She has now completed a new book on new conceptions of materiality and materialism.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Spatial Thinking in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Daniel Montello, Geography

Mondays
4:00-4:50pm
HSSB 1206

Enrollment code: 53181

Explore spatial reasoning for problem solving (sciences), creative expression (arts), and interpretation (humanities). Learn how statistics, graphs, maps, and virtual reality aid learning, analysis, data visualization, discovery/solutions to socio-environmental problems, and space/place interpretation. Arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, and engineering faculty illustrate spatial tools to integrate knowledge across disciplines.

Daniel Montello, Professor of Geography, investigates cognition in behavioral geography, geographic information science, and human-environment relations.  Mary Hegarty, Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, studies spatial thinking in comprehension, reasoning, and problem solving.  Donald Janelle, Researcher in Spatial Studies, investigates how transportation, communication, and information relate to human activity behavior.

montello@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: Introduction to Collaboration for the Theater
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50pm
TD-W 1530

Enrollment code: 53199

This seminar will follow the step-by-step process of artistic collaboration for the Theater as connected to a Department of Theater and Dance main stage production.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: HAMLET and TARTUFFE.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PR: Paris in the Twenties
Professor Enda Duffy, English

Tuesdays
1:00-1:50pm
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 56028

For artist and writers of the time, Paris in the 1920's was the most exciting place on earth.  In this seminar we will look at the work of artists, writers, designers, photographers and architects all of whom produced work in Paris in the 1920's: Joyce, Picasso, Gertrude Stein, Man Ray, Foujita, Eileen Grey, Le Corbusier, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Raul Dufy and Djuna Barnes. We will consider cafe culture, bohemianism, the roaring twenties and the innovations and experiments that generated modernist style.

Enda Duffy is a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at UCSB.  He is the author of “The Speed Handbook: Velocity, Pleasure, Modernism” and “The Subaltern Ulysses.” He is working on a book on energy in modern literature and culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PS: Soft and Squishy, Slimy and Slippery: The Science and Engineering of Everyday Materials
Professor Todd Squires, Chemical Engineering

Fridays
10:00-10:50am
ENGR2 3301

Enrollment code: 58040

Everyone knows about solids, liquids, and gasses.  But most folks don't think about the materials they use on a daily basis.  What is toothpaste, or cake frosting?  It sits like a solid, but spreads like a liquid.  How about silly putty?  It bounces off walls, yet slowly flows when left on a shelf.  Or shampoo – it seems as thick as honey when poured from the bottle, but feels as thin as water when applied to your hair.  How about mucous?  Bread dough?  Why does milk curdle when you add lemon juice?  This seminar will discuss the science and engineering behind the soft and squishy materials we see and use in our everyday lives.

Todd Squires earned dual B.S./B.A. degrees in Physics and Russian Literature at UCLA in 1995, then spent a year as a Churchill Scholar at Cambridge University, in Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. He earned his Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University in 2005 then spent three years as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Caltech. He is currently associate professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he started his faculty career in 2005. His group focuses on micro-scale fluid mechanics and soft materials.

squires@engineering.ucsb.edu

INT 94PT: Mathematics of Sudoku
Professor Jeffrey Stopple, Mathematics

Mondays
1:00-1:50pm
LSB 1101

Enrollment code: 64253

How many Sudoku solution squares are there?  What shapes can serve as acceptable Sudoku regions? What is the fewest number of starting clues? We will explore the connections between Sudoku, graph theory, and polynomials; and consider Sudoku extremes, including puzzles with the maximal number of vacant regions, with the minimal number of starting clues, and numerous others.

Professor Stopple's research is in analytic number theory, and the genus theory of binary quadratic forms.

stopple@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94PU: History in the Digital Age
Professor Claudio Fogu, French and Italian

Tuesdays
5:00-5:50 pm
HSSB 1206

Enrollment code: 65094

This course will introduce students to new questions posed to the traditional discipline of historical studies by the current digital revolution in representation. Topics covered will range from the construction and scholarly use of digital archives, to the production of e-books and e-journals, to the development of historically-inspired video games, interactive museum installations, and digitally-produced historical reconstructions in film and other media.

Professor Claudio Fogu has been teaching Modern Italian Studies at UCSB since 2006. He has focused his research and teaching on both the cultural history of 20th-century Italy and the more philosophical question of the relationship between modern historical consciousness and modern visual culture (from film to the digital media).

cfogu@frit.ucsb.edu

INT 94PX: Preparation for Admission to Schools of the Health Professions
Dr. Stephen Blain, College of Letters and Science

Thursdays
3:00-3:50pm
LSB  1101

Download presentation: Adobe pdf | MS Powerpoint

Enrollment code: 67173

This series of seminars is designed to expose incoming students to the academic and non-academic prerequisites necessary for admission to schools of the various health professions to enable the student to complete all of the requirements in a timely manner.  In addition to course requirements and academic performance, additional topics will include research, internships, admissions testing, letters of recommendation and interviews.

Dr. Blain is a clinical Professor Emeritus from UCLA and Professor Emeritus on recall at UCSB. He is a pediatric dentist and former Associate Dean of Admission, Student Affairs and Financial Aid at the UCLA School of Dentistry and chair of the admissions committee and counsels students in the L&S Advising Office.

sblain@ltsc.ucsb.edu

Spring 2012

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94FH: Disability in Film: Breaking the Mold
Professor George Singer, Education

Thursdays
9:00-9:50am
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 56226

This seminar will familiarize students with the ways in which disability has been presented in stereotypical and often demeaning ways in the history of film. Students will then see the impact of the disability rights movement on representations of people with human differences in recent cinema. Discussion and readings will focus attention on attitude formation and the social construction of disability.

Professor George Singer is a professor of special education with a focus on families of children with disabilities, education of children with severe disabilities, and disability studies. He has been a monk, a lumber mill hand, a special education teacher, director of research institutes, and a professor at the Dartmouth Medical School and at UCSB. He runs the UCSB special education credential program and advises doctoral students who go on to become professors. Dr. Singer has an abiding interest in the well-being of disadvantaged groups with an emphasis on individuals with disabilities.

singer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

First 5 Tuesdays
9:30-11:20am
Bldg 434, Room 121

Enrollment code: 25254

The exploration of identity - personal, cultural, familial, sexual - continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, video artists and performers, keep a personal journal, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Professor Kip Fulbeck teaches this interactive workshop, where students will view work by various filmmakers, video artists and performers, keep a personal journal, and engage in lively and intimate discussions.

INT 94HU: Food and Religion
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Fridays
2:00-2:50pm
GIRV 1108
* FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 25288

This seminar is an introduction to the study of religion based on the role food plays in myths and rituals. Attention will be given to the place of food in religions of hunting and gathering people, ancient civilizations, India, and in Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Professor Juan Campo teaches Introduction to the Study of Religion, Islam in South Asia, and Food, Religion, and Culture in the Middle East. His current research interests include the comparative study of pilgrimages in modernity, and shared Muslim/Hindu religious sites.

jcampo@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance

Wednesdays
5:00-5:50pm
TD-W 2517

Enrollment code: 25296

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008).

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JG: Death, Revenge, and Madness in Icelandic Literature and Culture
Professor Viola Miglio, Spanish and Portuguese

First 5 Tuesdays
12:00-1:50pm
PHELP 1420

Enrollment code: 56002

Tragic events are the pivots around which the fascinating and little known Icelandic literary tradition weaves its masterpieces. This course intends to show how these themes evolve from the Middle Ages to about the year 2006 and how they relate to the culture of one of Europe's peripheries, by analyzing Iceland's most significant prose and poetry through the filmed versions of these literary masterpieces.

Professor Viola Miglio’s main interests are sounds, language change and translation. She works on Romance languages (Spanish, Northern Italian dialects) and on Icelandic language, literature and history. She is about to publish a book on Basque whaling in Iceland in the 17th century with Prof. Xabier Irujo (University of Nevada, Reno).

miglio@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JS: Introduction to Santa Cruz Island
Professor Christopher Still, Geography

Saturday, April 28, 2012
8:00am-5:50pm
Girv 1108
* FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 53322

This Freshman Seminar will be an all-day visit to Santa Cruz Island. We will meet at the Ventura Harbor, take a boat to the island and hopefully get in some whale watching, and we will then take a 6 mile round-trip hike on the north side of the island. We will hang out at Pelican Bay and have lunch, and then hike back to the dock for the return trip to the mainland. The hike is fantastic and there is a nice hiking guide to go with it. I conduct ecological research on the island and know the flora and fauna well, and we will discuss the many amazing and unique aspects of the islands and the surrounding marine environment.

Professor Christopher Still, is a professor in the Department of Geography at UCSB. He studies plant distributions, ecology, and climate. He and his students conduct field research in the Channel Islands, and in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains. He has previously offered another Freshman Seminar (A Walk in the Woods), and the students loved it.

cstill@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94JZ: Conversation and Social Life
Professor Geoffrey Raymond, Sociology

Tuesdays
1:00-1:50pm
SSMS 3410

Enrollment code: 53330

This course introduces students to research on talk-in-interaction - a key social institution that enables and underwrites the informal social life of a society. We will focus on ordinary and institutional occasions of interaction to illustrate the variety of forms it can take, and the implications its organization can have for social relations, and social life.

Professor Geoffrey Raymond is an Associate Professor of Sociology. His research involves the detailed study of naturally occurring human interaction and its primary constituent components, including talk, gesture, gaze and body movement He is a member of the editorial boards of Social Psychology Quarterly and Language in Society.

graymond@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protecting Your Brain
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Mondays
3:00-3:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 53348

The class covers the effects of different injuries to your brain and how you can (and in some cases cannot) avoid them. WARNING: sometimes the photos and videos can be unpleasant to watch.

Professor Russell Revlin studies how people (children and adults) reason and make decisions. Some of these people have suffered damage to their brains. He wants to share this work with students so that they can prevent damage to their own brains and appreciate the damage suffered by other people.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94KZ: Anatomy of a Theatrical Production: Anowa
Professor Irwin Appel, Theater & Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50pm
TD-W 1507

Enrollment code: 69344

An in-depth, ‘behind the scenes’ investigation of Theatre UCSB’s production of Anowa by Ama Ata Aidoo, directed by Irwin Appel, professor of this seminar. Students will read the play and observe all of the aspects of the production itself, including acting, direction and design. The seminar will culminate with the viewing of a performance in the UCSB Hatlen Theater, along with a post-play discussion with actors and crew. The goal of the seminar will be to follow the progress of the production from play selection through actual performance. There will be mandatory attendance at two rehearsals, one performance, one post-play discussion, along with the possible viewing of additional optional rehearsals (students in the seminar will be observers, not participants in the production). Students will also get a chance to meet the playwright herself; Ama Ata Aidoo will be coming to UCSB from Ghana as a Regents Lecturer for the opening of the production.

Irwin Appel is Professor of Theater, and Director of UCSB's BFA Actor Training Program. As a professional Equity actor, director and composer/sound designer, he has worked extensively Off-Broadway, regionally, on tour and with major Shakespearean festivals throughout the USA. He is a graduate of Princeton University and the Juilliard School.

i.appel@cox.net

INT 94LS: Close Relationships 101
Professor Walid Afifi, Communication

Mondays
11:00-11:50am
GIRV 2116

Enrollment code: 53355

We will address some of the key aspects of close relationships, from attraction, to conflict and jealousy, to breakup, with a sprinkling of everything in between. Students will also have some voice on particular topics that they would like covered.

Professor Walid Afifi is a faculty member in the Department of Communication. He studies uncertainty in people's lives and how they manage it. He has also studied close relationships in many contexts, from cross-sex friendships to dating relationships to parent-child relationships.

w-afifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94LV: Biotechnology and Society
Professor Doug Thrower, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Mondays
11:00-11:50am
HSSB 1215

Enrollment code: 25353

This course will cover topics including the high cost of drugs, genetically modified organisms, genetic profiling, gene therapy, cloning, stem cells, forensic biology, biotechnology and global warming, and will conclude with a "field trip" to a research lab.

Professor Doug Thrower is focused on the molecular events that lead to cancer. He carries out research on mechanisms of anticancer drugs and proteins that regulate microtubules. Undergraduate courses taught include Genetics (MCDB 101A), the Biology of Cancer (MCDB 135), Pharmacology (MCDB 126A, 126BL), Cell Cycle Regulation (MCDB 135).

thrower@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94LY: Modernist Architecture in Los Angeles
Professor Sven Spieker, Germanic, Slavic & Semitic Studies

Friday, May 18, 2012
11:00-11:50am
and
Saturday, May 19, 2012*
8:00am-3:50pm
GIRV 1106
*FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 53363

The seminar meets on two days. On the first day, we will begin with a slide-assisted examination of early to mid-20th-century domestic architecture in Europe and the United States. Then, we will assess some buildings on the UCSB campus for their "modernist" elements. On the second day, the focus of our interest will be buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolf Schindler, and Richard Neutra, all of whom were active in L.A. in the first half of the 20th century. We will learn about the economics and the design of early 20th-century homes, and about the history of their preservation. Time will be spent at the Schindler archive at UCSB where much of the famous architect's archive is preserved. The students will learn what role archives such as this one can play when it comes to preserving architecture. They will also be able to interact with some more unique materials preserved on our campus. We will visit the Schindler home in West Hollywood, as well as Wright's Hollyhock house in Hollywood, and Richard Neutra's VDL research house. We will study our buildings and learn about their design, history of their preservation, and current uses. I hope to be able to involve an official from L.A.'s municipal preservation agency in the hopes that he/or she meet with us briefly. I plan to give the students group assignments that lets them search the buildings we visit for specifically "modernist" elements.

Professor Sven Spieker teaches in the Comparative Literature Program; the Department of Art and Art History; and the Department of Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He specializes in European modernism, with an emphasis on the Eastern European avant-gardes, contemporary art.

spieker@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94MA: Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights in the Andes
Professor Cecilia Mendez, History

First 4 Fridays
PLEASE NOTE: first class meeting is 12:00-12:50pm with subsequent 3 class meetings held 12:00-2:50pm
GIRV 2127

Enrollment code: 56861

Revolutions and guerrillas sparked in various Latin America countries between the 1950s and 1980s, but Peru and Colombia are peculiar in that guerrillas rose up there to fight democratic governments, not military juntas. Why do people take up arms to fight a democracy? What is the difference between a "terrorist" and a "guerrilla"? What lessons can Peru and Colombia teach the world concerning armed conflicts and human rights? These topics will be illustrated with three films, which will be watched and discussed in class, together with the accompanying readings.

Professor Cecilia Mendez is Associate Professor of History specialized in the History of Latin America with an emphasis on the Andean region during the national period.

mendez@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Thursdays
12:00-12:50pm
PSB-N 4606

Enrollment code: 56028

The year 2009 was the bicentennial of Darwin’s birthday and marked 150 years since the publication of his book “The Origin of Species”. At the same time a Gallup Poll shows that 44% of Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Should we worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternate medicine just quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say? Explore the history and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Analytical Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94MZ: Risk and Resiliency in Families
Professor Tamara Afifi, Communication

Mondays
9:30-10:20am
SSMS 1009

Enrollment code: 25379

The purpose of this seminar will be to introduce students to communication processes in families that place family members at risk for, or make them more resilient to, various physical and mental health difficulties, stress, difficulty coping, etc. Topics that will be covered will include divorce, conflict, addictions, adolescence, attachments, family strengths, and coping.

Professor Tamara Afifi studies and teaches family communication, interpersonal communication, and conflict management. While she loves research, she equally loves to teach and enjoys interacting with students.

tafifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94NL: Pirates!
Professor Bhaskar Sarkar, Film & Media Studies

First 6 Tuesdays
11:00am-1:00pm
GIRV 2110

Enrollment code: 56036

This course examines media piracy and global intellectual property rights controversies in the context of the long history of piracy. We explore the pirate as both a swashbuckling renegade, and a terrifying "enemy of all mankind."

Professor Bhaskar Sarkar’s research interests include globalization and media, risk and speculation, intellectual property and media piracy, and Indian and Chinese cinemas.

sarkar@filmandmedia.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Documentaries and History
Professor Mario T. Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

First 6 Thursdays
1:00-2:50pm
HSSB 1233

Enrollment code: 25403

This seminar will introduce students to documentary historical films and how they can be used to learn about the history of Chicano/Latinos in the United States.

Mario T. Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies and has published widely in Chicano history on issues such as immigration, civil rights, leadership, and generational change.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94NY: Statistical Intuition: For Daily Careful Use!
Professor Wendy Meiring, Statistics and Applied Probability

Mondays
9:00-9:50am
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 25411

Each meeting we will discuss one or more chapters in the book “What is a p-value anyway? 34 stories to help you actually understand statistics" by Andrew Vickers. Through these fun stories we will build up intuition behind many statistical concepts that students from all fields of study encounter in their daily lives. We also will discuss common misunderstandings of statistics.

Professor Wendy Meiring is an environmental statistician who studies environmental and ecological quantities that evolve over space and time. She completed her Ph.D. in Statistics at the University of Washington, in Seattle. She then was a post-doctoral Visiting Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, before moving to UCSB. At UCSB the classes she has taught include: PSTAT 5LS (Statistics for the Life Sciences), PSTAT 174/274 (Time Series), PSTAT 232 (Computational Statistics), PSTAT 120AB (Probability and Mathematical Statistics), several graduate level applied statistics classes on linear and generalized linear models, statistical consulting, and also "Special Topics" classes on "Environmental Statistics", and "Functional Data Analysis".

miering@pstat.ucsb.edu

INT 94OD: The Cuban Revolution: An Introduction
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Thursdays
5:00-5:50pm
GIRV 2127

Enrollment code: 57422

Social justice, Cold War, guerrillas, Che Guevara, Fidel, alphabetization campaigns, anti-imperialism, nuclear missiles, popular emancipation, political repression, universal health care and education, dissidence: all this and more in this introduction to the Cuban Revolution, one of the most influential events of the past century. Through selected readings, films and class discussions this seminar will present a historical overview of the Revolution from its origins until the present, focusing on areas like geopolitics, globalization, the role of the people and the State, and the imaginaries of ‘revolution’ and the ‘revolutionary’. This topic is very controversial and students are encouraged to participate in this debate.

Professor Juan Pablo Lupi’s teaching and research interests include contemporary Caribbean literature, the Cuban writer José Lezama Lima and the Orígenes group, Venezuelan literature and history, literary theory, and literature and science.

jplupi@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94OM: Measuring Our Environment: An Introduction to Environmental Controls on Plant Communities and the Instruments We Use to Study Them
Professor Dar Roberts, Geography

Mondays
1:00-1:50pm
ELLSN 2816
* FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 53645

Students will be introduced to the manner in which physical location controls local climate and living organisms, followed by an introduction to environmental instrumentation. This course includes a one day field trip to two University reserves to see the instruments in action and use of a website for data display and analysis.

Professor Dar Roberts teaches courses in physical geography, remote sensing, field methods and historical geography. His primary research is in the area of remote sensing, where he studies things like tropical deforestation, fire danger, hazards (such as the Gulf Oil Spill) and mapping plant communities.

dar@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94ON: Hungry for Justice: Religion, Spirituality, and Revolution
Professor Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval, Chicana & Chicano Studies

First 5 Mondays
9:00-10:50am
HSSB 1232

Enrollment code: 56069

This class will explore the lives of social justice activists who took great risks (going without food, being arrested, giving up the comfortable lives, etc.) to bring about social change. The focus will be on religious or spiritually-based activists such as Oscar Romero, Dorothy Day, Bobby Sands, and others.

Professor Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval has taught in the Chicana/o Studies Department since 1998. His research focuses on social movements, religion, activism, and social change. He has been active in social movements around sweatshops, the UC system, labor rights, and immigrant rights.

armbrust@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94OT: Democratizing Gender: Reconstructions of Masculinity & Femininity in the New Millenium
Professor Edwina Barvosa, Chicana & Chicano Studies, Feminist Studies

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 53371

This seminar explores the interconnection between two major concepts: democratization & gender. In different ways, both concepts remain deeply debated today. Here we will explore these debates, and consider whether old and new gender inequities might be addressed through democratizing social practices that potentially reshape our sense of gender relations.

Dr. Edwina Barvosa is a political scientist specializing in social and political theory, and racial, ethnic and gender studies. She earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her M.A. from Cambridge University. Her gender research focuses on how gender inequities affecting both men and woman can be addressed though social reconstructions.

barvosa@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94PE: Medicine and Mass Media
Professor Duane Sears, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Mondays
4:00-4:50pm
LSB 1101

Enrollment code: 53652

Mass media is exploited to shape our perceptions of the supposed medical "benefits" of certain treatments, drugs, dietary supplements, etc. while alerting us to the supposed "dangers" of other medical interventions, such as vaccinations, water fluoridation, etc. Who’s right and how do we know who’s right? Students will evaluate such claims in short written papers followed by oral presentations.

Professor Duane Sears is a biologist with primary interests in immunology and biochemistry. While teaching several upper-division courses in these disciplines, his scientific research focuses on the phagocytic receptors of the immune system and his academic research focuses on improvements in undergraduate science instruction.

sears@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94PG: Economics Without the Jargon
Professor Jon Sonstelie, Economics

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50pm
HSSB 1211

Enrollment code: 53678

Economists like to say they study the everyday lives of ordinary people, but most ordinary people don’t understand economists. The problem is that economists use a language ordinary people don’t use. There are some exceptions, however. In this seminar, we’ll read and discuss selected essays from some plain spoken economists.

Professor Jon Sonstelie is a professor of economics at UCSB and an adjunct fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California. His areas of expertise are urban economics and public finance. He teaches the introductory economics course at UCSB, Economics 1, and an upper division course in urban economics, Economics 120.

jon@econ.ucsb.edu

INT 94PH: The Female Gaze: Seeing As A Woman
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Mondays
2:30-3:20pm
South Hall 2635

Enrollment code: 53389

How do women represent themselves and reality? What makes a novel, a film, a photograph distinctively feminine and feminist? The seminar examines the representational strategies women writers (Virginia Woolf, for example), film-makers (Jane Campion) and photographers (Cindy Sherman) use to create their own texts.

Professor Maurizia Boscagli is an associate Professor in English. She teaches gender theory and twentieth century studies. Her interests include women's cultural production, materialism and theories of consumption, cinema and twentieth century visual culture. She has written about modern masculinity, politics and affect, and about material culture.

bascagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PI: Ten Passionate Poems
Professor Enda Duffy, English

Tuesdays
1:00-1:50pm
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 56044

How do you speak passion? Poetry tries to do it. In this seminar we will read one brilliant, intense and beautiful poem in English each session, by poets spanning a half-millennium. You will encounter works of art that distill intensity, heartbreak, triumph and desire, and understand how you can be moved by these words when the passion is transmitted to you.

Enda Duffy is a Professor of English and a scholar of Joyce and modernist literature and culture. His most recent book, “The Speed Handbook,” won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize last year.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PJ: Coming Home: Soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan
Professor Susan Derwin, Comparative Literature

First 4 Thursdays
3:00-5:50pm
HSSB 1223

Enrollment code: 56218

This seminar will consider the challenges and opportunities that returning veterans face as they come home from Iraq and Afghanistan. We will watch documentaries and read short texts that address the impact of warfare, the challenges of returning to civilian life, the community's relation to veterans.

Professor Susan Derwin writes and teaches in the fields of European literature, Holocaust studies, and trauma studies.

derwin@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94PK: Asian Ethnic Cuisine in America
Professor Xiaojian Zhao, Asian American Studies

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50am
HSSB 5024

Enrollment code: 56234

This seminar examines Asian cuisine in the United States from a historical perspective. It explores the development and evolution of various types of Asian foods in the U.S. and their increasing popularity, reflecting demographic and social changes over time.

A historian by training, Professor Xiaojian Zhao has taught in the Department of Asian American Studies at UCSB for 18 years. She has written several Asian American history books, focusing mostly on Chinese immigration and Chinese American community.

xiaojian@asamst.ucsb.edu

INT 94PL: What is Computing?
Professor Tevfik Bultan, Computer Science

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50am
SSMS 2303

Enrollment code: 56259

Computer technology has produced many impressive gadgets that surround us every day. However, its foundations are still a mystery to many. The purpose of this seminar is to discuss what computing is, with the hope of getting some insights about its essence and its future potential.

Professor Tevfik Bultan conducts research on improving dependability of computer systems, focusing particularly on software. He believes that software development can be easier and less error prone.

bultan@cs.ucsb.edu

Winter 2012

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Click on the seminar title to expand the course info.

INT 94BZ: Genetic Modification of Food Crops
Professor Rolf Christoffersen, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Fridays
2:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 1207

Enrollment code: 26708

The seminar will explore the implications of genetic modification of our food crops with special emphasis on the application of recombinant DNA technology for crop improvement. The scientific basis of these technologies will be explained at the level of a non-science major. Course materials will include a critical review of articles from the popular scientific press concerning the dangers and benefits of GM crops. The potential impact (both good and bad) on agriculture in developing countries will also be covered.

Professor Rolf Christoffersen teaches Molecular Genetics and Plant Molecular Biology. The general area of interest in his laboratory is the biochemistry and molecular biology of higher plants.

christof@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94EI: Epigenetics: From Sex to Drugs, Bacteria to Humans
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tuesdays 12:00-12:50 pm HSSB 1232

Enrollment code: 26716

We will cover the broad field of epigenetics, covering bacteria, plants and animals including humans. Imprinting, x-inactivation, cancer drugs, methods of study, implications for evolution. Students are asked to read literature, often found in journals like Scientific American, and turn in a two page paper.

Professor Norbert Reich’s academic background is in biochemistry with emphases on drug design and protein engineering. We study enzyme mechanisms with a focus on epigenetic and biomedically relevant enzyme processes. We also develop new biotechnology and biomedical tools and methods. I've started companies related to these areas.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94FW: Alchemy
Professor David White, Religious Studies

Wednesdays
12:00-12:50pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment code: 51623

For over two thousand years, humans have sought to perfect metals and their own bodies through the use of mineral preparations. In this class, we will survey the history of the world's alchemical traditions, from ancient China, India, and Europe down to the great Renaissance alchemists, who included Isaac Newton.

Professor David White has written several books on mythology, yoga, and tantra. He is the leading authority on the subject of Hindu Alchemy, and has also done extensive research on other world alchemical traditions.

white@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Adams, History of Art and Architecture

2 Saturdays
January 21, 2012, 10:00am-3:50pm
*January 28, 2012, 8:30am-5:50pm
Phelps 3530
* FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 51631

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance

Thursdays
5:00-5:50 pm
TD-W 2517

Enrollment code: 26740

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King specializes in dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008).

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

First 4 Tuesdays
3:00-5:20 pm
HSSB 1231

Enrollment code: 26773

Introduction to new Latin American film focusing primarily on Mexico and Argentina. Study will be made of key films to understand contemporary social and cultural issues, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 60s, the aftermath of dictatorships, and the effects of civil war.

Professor Ellen McCracken specializes in Latin American and U.S. Latino literature. Her books include Decoding Women's Magazines and New Latina Narrative.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JS: A Walk in the Woods
Professor Christopher Still, Geography

*Saturday, March 3, 2012
8:00am-5:50pm
LSB 1101
*FIELD TRIP

Enrollment code: 51649

This seminar will introduce students new to UCSB and the Santa Barbara area to the landscape and flora of the Santa Ynez Mountains. These mountains provide a spectacular backdrop, reaching just over 4,000 feet in elevation, and yet few UCSB students take advantage of the incredible recreational and natural history opportunities they offer. This all-day seminar will begin with a stop at the Santa Barbara Botanical Garden to introduce students to some of the plants we will see on our hike. We will then drive to the Tunnel trailhead and begin our hike. One focus of the hike will be to monitor changes in plant communities, landscapes, and the geological substrate as we ascend.

Professor Christopher Still studies plant distributions, ecology, and climate. He does field research in the Channel Islands, and in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains. He has taught this seminar 5 times before and the students have always loved it.

cstill@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94JZ: Conversation and Social Life
Professor Geoffrey Raymond, Sociology

Tuesdays
1:00-1:50pm
SSMS 3410

Enrollment code: 51656

This course introduces students to research on talk-in-interaction - a key social institution that enables and underwrites the informal social life of a society. We will focus on ordinary and institutional occasions of interaction to illustrate the variety of forms it can take, and the implications its organization can have for social relations, and social life.

Professor Geoffrey Raymond’s research involves the detailed study of naturally occurring human interaction and its primary constituent components, including talk, gesture, gaze and body movement He is a member of the editorial boards of Social Psychology Quarterly and Language in Society.

graymond@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94KN: Protecting Your Brain
Professor Russell Revlin, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
3:00-3:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 26799

The class covers the effects of different injuries to your brain and how you can (and in some cases cannot) avoid them. WARNING: sometimes the photos and videos can be unpleasant to watch.

Professor Russell Revlin studies how people (children and adults) reason and make decisions. Some of these people have suffered damage to their brains. He wants to share this work with students so that they can prevent damage to their own brains and appreciate the damage suffered by other people.

revlin@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94LH: Memory & History in Contemporary Spanish Literature & Film
Professor Silvia Bermúdez, Spanish and Portuguese

Tuesdays
1:30-2:20pm
Bldg 387, Room 103

Enrollment code: 51664

To understand present-day Spain, we will examine how contemporary Spanish authors and filmmakers have assessed the political and historical events of the past 100 years.

Professor Silvia Bermúdez is currently researching transatlantic issues (e.g. immigration and border crossing) in contemporary Spanish music and literature.

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94LT: The Elegant Universe
Professor David Morrison, Mathematics

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50pm
BRDA 3302

Enrollment code: 26807

The early twentieth century saw two major advances in theoretical physics: Einstein's theory of general relativity, which gives a framework for understanding the universe on the scale of stars, galaxies, and beyond, and quantum mechanics, which gives a framework for understanding the universe on the scale of molecules, atoms, and subatomic particles. Both theories are extremely well tested under ordinary physical conditions, but when they are extrapolated to extreme physical conditions (such as near a black hole), they are incompatible. We will explore these two important aspects of theoretical physics, as well as a possible resolution to the incompatibility known as superstring theory. Our discussions will emphasize metaphor rather than equations; there are no mathematics or physics prerequisites, only a willingness to engage difficult intellectual material.

Professor David Morrison is an expert on the mathematical aspects of string theory. His recent courses include: Differential Equations and Linear Algebra, Modern Algebra, Algebraic Geometry, Basic Physics, and Methods of Theoretical Physics.

drm@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94MD: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict 101: Multiple Perspectives
Professor Walid Afifi, Communication

Mondays
10:00-10:50am
GIRV 2116

Enrollment code: 26815

This seminar will introduce students to some of the basic issues involved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, both from a historical and current-day standpoint. Issues will be discussed from both a Palestinian perspectives and an Israeli one, with the hope of offering a more complete account of crisis.

Dr. Walid Afifi studies uncertainty in people's lives and how they manage it. He grew up in Beirut, Lebanon and descents from a Palestinian family. He has been active on campus to improve the quality of the discussions surrounding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

w-afifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94ME: Moral Paradoxes
Professor Matthew Hanser, Philosophy

Fridays
1:00-1:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51672

This is an introduction to moral philosophy via the study of moral paradoxes.

Professor Matthew Hanser specializes in moral philosophy, philosophy of law, and philosophy of action.

hanser@philosophy.ucsb.edu

INT 94MO: Central American Cultures, Histories, and Migrations
Professor Horacio Roque Ramirez, Chicana & Chicano Studies

First 5 Tuesdays
12:00-12:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51680

The course offers an overview of Central American politics and history, emphasizing the 1970s revolutionary through the exiles of the 1970s to the present. We look closely at the individual and collective decisions leading to the migration process, adjustment in the U.S., and how culture, politics, religion, migration, and sexuality play a role.

Professor Roque Ramirez’s research, teaching, and writing focus on LGBT "queer" Latina and Latino communities in the U.S., and Central American history and migrations to the U.S. He conducts oral history and ethnographic research, and work on country conditions in Central America and Mexico as they relate to political asylum based on sexuality and gender.

roqueramirez@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Thursdays 12:00-12:50pm PSB-N 4606

Enrollment code: 51698

The year 2009 was the bicentennial of Darwin’s birthday and marked 150 years since the publication of his book "The Origin of Species". At the same time a Gallup Poll shows that 44% of Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Should we worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternate medicine just quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say? Explore the history and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Analytical Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94MZ: Risk and Resiliency in Families
Professor Tamara Afifi, Communication

Tuesdays
9:30-10:20am
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51706

The purpose of this seminar will be to introduce students to communication processes in families that place family members at risk for, or make them more resilient to, various physical and mental health difficulties, stress, difficulty coping, etc. Topics that will be covered will include divorce, conflict, addictions, adolescence, attachments, family strengths, and coping.

Professor Tamara Afifi studies and teaches family communication, interpersonal communication, and conflict management. While she loves research, she equally loves to teach and enjoys interacting with students.

tafifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94NH: Introduction to Comparative Literature
Professor Katherine Saltzman-Li, East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies

Wednesdays 3:00-3:50pm HSSB 1231

Enrollment code: 58602

Comparative Literature is both an increasingly important academic field in our "global" world, and a strongly-represented field at UCSB. This seminar will introduce the study of Comparative Literature, including its methods, tools, and issues of current concern, culminating in a short student project.

Professor Katherine Saltzman-Li's research is on Japanese theatre (kabuki and noh), comparative theatre, and Japanese literature. She has taught a variety of courses in premodern Japanese literature, theatre, folklore, and comparative literature.

ksaltzli@eastasian.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario T. Garcia, Chicana & Chicano Studies

First 5 Thursdays
1:00-2:50pm
HSSB 1223

Enrollment code: 26864

This seminar will consist of showing several film documentaries on Chicano/Latino historical issues such as immigration, civil rights, and the Chicano Movement.

Mario T. Garcia, Professor of Chicano Studies and a specialist in Chicano History has published various books on Chicano history including on immigration, civil rights, and leadership.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94NW: Secularism, Theism, and Cultural Conflicts
Professor Emiritus Richard Martin, Chemistry

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50am
GIRV 2116

Enrollment code: 26872

This seminar will examine the principles of secularism, scientific inquiry, scientific skepticism, and critical thinking. These principles will be applied to investigate areas where secular and theistic beliefs lead to cultural conflicts, and to areas where science denial affects public policy. Students will give presentations and actively participate in discussions.

Professor Emeritus Richard Martin has taught Chemistry courses from Chem 1A to upper division and graduate courses. He served on the committee that established the Environmental Studies Program in 1970, and taught the first course in that program, The Physical Environment, for several years.

martin@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94NX: How (and What) Animals See
Professor Gerald Jacobs, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50pm
GIRV 2108

Enrollment code: 26880

The suspicion that the visual worlds other animals inhabit may be very different from those we enjoy is of long standing; for example, in 370 BCE, Plato raised the following question: “..are you quite certain that the several colors appear to a dog or to any animal whatever as they appear to you?” Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in our understanding of the biological machinery that allows various animals to see, of how these diverse capacities allow them to succeed, and of how vision evolved. This seminar will address these issues with the goal of providing an appreciation for the enormous variations in visual worlds available across the animal kingdom.

Professor Jacobs has 40 years of research on vision and the visual system. He has taught many courses in Biopsychology, including Visual Neuroscience.

jacobs@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94OK: 2012 -- What You Need to Know
Professor Gerardo Aldana, Chicana & Chicano Studies

Thursdays
1:00-1:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51714

This course is an introduction to Classic Mayan civilization through its misrepresentation by 2012ers.

Professor Gerardo Aldana’s research interests in Mayan hieroglyphic writing and archaeology, the history of science in ancient civilizations, Mesoamerican philosophies and religions.

gvaldana@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94OL: James Joyce and Modern Culture
Professor Enda Duffa, English

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51722

What does James Joyce, the most brilliant writer in English of the last hundred years, have to tell us about how we live now? What do his once banned books tell us about constructing a self, about national identity, about being alone, about human sexuality and about the carnival of the modern, often alien, metropolis? We will look at key stories and novels by Joyce as guideposts to the modern, to survival, and to contemporary culture.

Professor Enda Duffy teaches modern British and Irish literature, cultural studies and critical theory. His books include, The Subaltern Ulysses and The Speed Handbook: Velocity, Pleasure, Modernism, which won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize as the year's best in modernist studies. He is the director of COMMA.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94OP: Feminism? Post-Feminism? No Feminism?
Professor Beth Schnedier, Sociology

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50am
HSSB 1211

Enrollment code: 51730

The seminar explores the meaning of, and activities related to, feminist activism in the 21st century. Students will read writings by young feminists, examine relevant blogs and social media, keep a journal, and engage in lively discussion with one another and with women of other generations who do feminist work.

Professor Beth Schneider has taught contemporary feminist movements, sociology of AIDS, and sexualities. Dr. Schneider is also the President of the Board of the Santa Barbara Women's Political Committee.

schneider@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94OR: Studying Climate Change in the Oceans
Professor Gretchen Hofmann, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50am
GIRV 2108

Enrollment code: 51748

This seminar will explore the global change biology of climate change impacts on the world’s oceans. We will cover topics that pertain to the way the environment is changing, how the organisms might respond and what the impacts might be on critical marine ecosystems such as coral reefs.

Professor Gretchen Hofmann is an eco-physiologist whose research focuses on the effects of climate and climate change on the performance of marine species. In particular, her recent research investigates the impact on marine organisms of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations via global warming and ocean acidification.

hofmann@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94OS: Women's Writing on the Edge
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Thursdays
2:00-2:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51755

This seminar addresses women's writing as a problem. What is women's writing? What makes it gender-distinctive? Is it a matter of style, (the way women write), or rather of content (the topics women write about: the feminine condition in society, the body, gender discrimination, motherhood). We will take into consideration both approaches by examining literary texts by Charlotte Bronte, Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, Edwige Danticat among other contemporary writers.

Professor Maurizia Boscagli specializes in Feminist and Gender Studies, Twentieth Century Studies and Modernism. She has written a book on modern masculinity, translated a volume of political theory from Italian into English, and completed a new manuscript on new materialities and contemporary materialism.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94OT: Democratizing Gender: Reconstructions of Masculinity & Femininity in the New Millenium
Professor Edwina Barvosa, Chicana & Chicano Studies

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51789

This seminar explores the interconnection between two major concepts: democratization & gender. In different ways, both concepts remain deeply debated today. Here we will explore these debates, and consider whether old and new gender inequities might be addressed through democratizing social practices that potentially reshape our sense of gender relations.

Dr. Edwina Barvosa is a political scientist specializing in social and political theory, and racial, ethnic and gender studies. She earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her M.A. from Cambridge University. Her gender research focuses on how gender inequities affecting both men and woman can be addressed though social reconstructions.

barvosa@chicst.ucsb.edu

INT 94OU: LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater & Dance

Tuesdays
4:50-5:40pm
HSSB 1105

Enrollment code: 51797

LAUNCH PAD is the UCSB Dept. of Theater and Dance new play development program. With the playwright in residence, we produce a world premiere each year. Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development. Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers in class and observe rehearsals to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage.

Risa Brainin, Professor / Director of Performance, directorial credits include plays at Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatre Festival. Artistic Director of LAUNCH PAD.
www.risabrainin.com

rbrainin@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94OV: Introduction to Sustainability
Professor Eric Matthys, Mechanical Engineering

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50am
NH 1109

Enrollment code: 59469

The Seminar will introduce the students to the concept of Sustainability and its implementation on campus and in the local community by various groups including student organizations. Various topics will be addressed such as Energy, Recycling, Water, Food, Land use etc.

Professor Matthys has been teaching and researching issues related to Energy for many years. He has also taught broad-based non-technical Freshman Seminars about Energy to introduce students to the general concept of where Energy is coming from, how it's being used and how we will produce the needed Energy for the World in the future.

matthys@engineering.ucsb.edu

INT 94OX: Microbe Worlds: Contemporary Pandemic Risk Media
Professor Bishnupriya Ghosh, English

First 5 Wednesdays
1:00-2:50pm
HSSB 1214

Enrollment code: 51805

Imperceptible to the human eye, the virus is widely, if grudgingly, acknowledged as a global actor in our times. Faced with numerous "pandemics" (SARS, HIV, H1N1), we increasingly rely on risk media (films, novels, advertising, WHO/CDC advisories) for managing our fears of global viral contagion. The critical analysis of an ensemble of risk media will be the subject of this course, a seminar associated with the Critical Issues in America theme for 2011-12.

Professor Bishnupriya Ghosh teaches global media studies and contemporary twentieth-century literatures in English.

bghosh@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94OY: From Virgin Goddess to the Virgin Mary: Learning to See the New in the Old
Professor Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, History

Wednesdays
11:00-11:50am
HSSB 1207

Enrollment code: 51813

This seminar will explore the role of virgin goddesses and the Virgin Mary within the ancient Mediterranean world, from the first through the fifth century A.D.

Professor Elizabeth DePalma Digeser studies the intersection of religion and philosophy with Roman politics, as well as the process of "conversion" in Late Antiquity. She is publishing a new book identifying a group of Platonists as one of the motive forces behind the Great Persecution (303-11). Her new research focuses on what used to be called "pagan" survivals in the cities and towns, churches and temples of Sicily and Asia Minor (aka Turkey).

edepalma@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94PC: Independent Music in America
Professor David Novak, Music

First 5 Mondays
5:30-7:20pm
Arts 2406

Enrollment code: 51821

What does it mean for music to be independent? This course explores the history of US punk, underground, and "indie" music from the 1970s to the present. Readings and audiovisual materials will illustrate the impact of DIY industries and alternative and new media on the formation of musical subcultures.

Professor David Novak is an ethnomusicologist, musician, and sound engineer who writes about the global circulation of popular music. His research explores modern cultural representation though musical performance, recording technologies, film and video, environmental soundscapes, and new media.

dnovak@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94PD: Understanding the Global Energy and Climate Systems to Best Invest in Our Future
Professor Catherine Gautier, Geography

Wednesdays in February, 2012
5:00-6:50pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 51839

The need for energy independence for economic and political reasons and plans to mitigate climate change is influencing the US energy policy for the upcoming decades. The choices made now will impact many aspects of our lives, and more importantly our future economic growth and environmental well being. These decisions will require a population with a solid knowledge and understanding of the various options available and their potential consequences. This seminar will discuss these options.

Professor Catherine Gautier was trained as an atmospheric physicist and now teaches about Energy and Climate. She has written a book "Oil, Water and Climate" that addresses these issues and their interactions.

gautier@geog.ucsb.edu