Discovery @ UCSB Seminars - Archive

Consult the lists below for information on past Discovery @ UCSB Seminars. For current offerings, please see the main Seminars List page.

 

Fall 2019 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AI: Star Wars: Psychological and Literary Perspectives
Professor Kara Mae Brown, Writing Program/College of Creative Studies
Professor Steve Smith, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology/College of Creative Studies

Wednesday 1-2:50
Old Little Theatre

Enrollment Code:             28266

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away students critically examined the original Star Wars trilogy from a psychological and literary perspective. Students will study Star Wars as an example of Joseph Campbell's heroic journey, with special attention to the psychology of heroes and the film's storytelling techniques.

Kara Mae Brown, MFA is a Lecturer in the Writing Program and the College of Creative Studies. Her teaching and research interests include writing pedagogy, creative writing, and feminist theories of The Force.

karamaebrown@writing.ucsb.edu

Steve Smith, Ph.D. is clinical psychologist on the faculties of the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology and the College of Creative Studies. His interests include the psychology of men and boys, psychological assessment, the mental health needs of athletes, and ethical uses of the Jedi Mind Trick.

ssmith@education.ucsb.edu

Fall 2019 - First Year Exploration Seminars

INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes 2019
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry
 

This seminar is held: MTWRF 1200-150 ***During the week of October 7-11 ONLY***

PSB-N 4606

Enrollment Code:             28274

In the week of October 7 the 2018 Nobel prizes will be announced. We will find out how one gets nominated and follow the announcements in the different fields on the days they happen. We will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94GG: INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art:  Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art
 

Tuesday 10:00-11:50
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code:             28308

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, PBS, The New York Times, and The TODAY Show and has exhibited throughout the world. He is the author of several books and the recipient of the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

kfulbeck@yahoo.com

 

 

INT 94IT: The Origins of Life: Are We Alone?
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science
 

W 100-150
HSSB 2251

Enrollment Code:             69930

Our seminar will deal with fascinating questions on the origins of life and whether life exists elsewhere. Are we alone? We will discuss ideas on the origin of life on Earth, whether other planets and moons could have life, and whether there is intelligent life in the universe.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94OS: Women and Representation
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English
 

Thursday 200-250
South Hall 2635

Enrollment Code:             63073

The question of representation, that is, having the power to tell one's own story, has always been extremely important for women. In this seminar we will read texts whose protagonist affirms her identity and the reality of her own condition, or struggles to do so against patriarchal power. We will read fiction by Charlotte Bronte, Jean Rhys, Edwige Danticat, Jeannette Winterson, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Maurizia Boscagli is professor of English, and is affiliated with Feminist Studies and Comparative Literature. She specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century literature and culture, gender and sexualities, materialism and aesthetics.  her research focuses on the critique of gender, modernism, cosmopolitanism and migration.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94OU: LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater and Dance
 

Monday 400-450
HSSB 1105

Enrollment Code:             78477

LAUNCH PAD is the new play development program at UCSB's Department of Theater and Dance. With the

playwright in residence, we produce a "preview production" of a new play each year. Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development. Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers during class time, and observe 3 key rehearsals to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage. This year's play is "What Martha Did" by Enid Graham. For more information on LAUNCH PAD: https://launchpad.theaterdance.ucsb.edu

Risa Brainin is Professor of Theater and Artistic Director of UCSB's new play development program LAUNCH PAD. Directorial credits include plays at Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Syracuse Stage, Denver Center Theatre Company, Pittsburgh Public Theater,Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatre Festival and many others. Professor Brainin is a graduate of the Carnegie-Mellon Drama Program. www.risabrainin.com

rbrainin@ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94SQ: Introduction to Vegan Studies
Professor Renan Larue, French and Italian
 

Wednesday 100-150
HSSB 1224

Enrollment Code:             78469

Vegetarianism and veganism are growing movements that oppose animal suffering and promote environmental sustainability. More and more people in the US, especially in California, are adopting a plant-based diet. This course will discuss vegetarianism and veganism: their underlying claims, their philosophical roots and history, their discussion in literature and the media, and ultimately their implications in our contemporary world. The course will have 5 short sessions and a field trip.

Renan Larue is an associate professor of French literature. His field of research is eighteenth-century French literature and history of ideas. In 2015, he published the first history of the vegetarian movement ever written in French (Le végétarisme et ses ennemis)

renanlarue@frit.ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94QQ: Russian Animated Films
Professor Sara Pankenier Weld, Germanic and Slavic Studies

Wednesday 10-1050
PHELP 1448

Enrollment Code:             63396

Characterized by astonishing craftsmanship and profound moral allegory, Russian animated film elevates animation to the highest levels of its form. In this course we screen and discuss a variety of short films by significant Russian directors, including the legendary Yuri Norstein, as we place them in cultural context and pinpoint the unique aspects of Russian animation and of the animated film as an art form.

Sara Pankenier Weld teaches courses on Russian, comparative literature, and children's literature in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies and the Comparative Literature Program. Her interests span world literature plus childhood, visuality, film, and theory. She loves languages (learn Russian!) and traveling, with one highlight being the Trans-Siberian railroad.

saraweld@ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94TI: Department of Music LIVE
Professor Jill Felber, Music
 

Day & Time - One class meeting on - November 19th from 4:00-4:50

Room - Music 2224

Enrollment Code:             28373

Department of Music Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. One class is required and attendance at four Department of Music concerts in the term is expected.

Here is an example of a schedule for a previous quarter:

Class Meeting

Tuesday, May 28, 2019, 4:00-5:00pm

Room 2224, Music Building

Concerts
UCSB Wind Ensemble
Thursday, May 30, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with IDÂ

   
UCSB Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players
Monday, June 3, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with IDÂ


UCSB Jazz Ensemble
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with ID

 UCSB Gospel Choir
Friday, June 7, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with ID

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over five hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94TK: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Friday 3-350
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             28399

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll also discuss ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics who does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider. These experiments involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94TP: Not Your Disney's Coco: Día de los Muertos as a Bilingual, Bicultural Community Event
Professor Dolores InésCasillas, Chicana and Chicano Studies
 

This seminar will meet once before the field trip on Sunday, November 3.

Monday 1230-145

SH 1623

Enrollment Code:             73346

Día de los Muertos is the most recognizable Chicano (Mexican American) artistic, cultural practice in the United States. This seminar meets twice (for an hour) to cover the history and significance of Día de los Muertos (pre and post Disney's Coco). We then spend a full day volunteering at a school festival hosted by a local dual-language immersion elementary school (Sunday, November 3). Spanish not needed, but helpful. Enthusiasm for working with kids and at cultural events is necessary! Travel to/from festival will be done via public bus.

Dolores Inés Casillas writes and teaches about U.S. Spanish-language media; Chicana and Latina popular culture; Radio & Sound practices; and Language Politics. She’s a fierce advocate of bilingual education and believes Día de los Muertos is hands down the Best Holiday Ever. (More about her books and writings here: https://www.chicst.ucsb.edu/people/dolores-inés-casillas)

casillas@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94TW: Food Writing: The Good, the Bad, and the Distasteful
Professor Katie Baillargeon, Writing Program

Monday 2:00 -2:50 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code:             64113

#Instafood, Tasty videos by Buzzfeed, food blogs, Yelp: all demonstrate how food writing has grown beyond its traditional cookbook and review genres. This seminar explores various textual and visual genres of food writing and, via select readings, emphasizes how to write about food and understand the issues most current in the field.

Katie Baillargeon has a PhD in Musicology from UCSB and has taught in the Writing Program since 2008. Personally, she is fascinated by our cultural focus on food and has themed several research writing courses around food. She also used to sell her homemade cheesecakes in high school.

baillargeon@writing.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Progress
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing

Tuesday 2-250
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code:             28423

This seminar will discuss the history and future of global progress in relation to economics, politics, philosophy, and history. We will study how politicians and the media hide global progress and present an overly negative view of the world. This seminar requires student participation and light reading.

I have been teaching for 20 years,, and I have PhDs in Psychology and English.  I am the author of 11 published books.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

 

INT 94UP: We are Gauchos: Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor KathyPatterson, Writing Program
 

Tuesday 100-150
GIRV 2135

Enrollment Code:             28431

This seminar explores campus and Isla Vista sites, artifacts, and practices illustrating how what we remember—and forget—about our shared past shapes who we are in the present and who we may be in the future. Field observation and archival research informed by readings from memory studies and local history will be used to examine who we are as Gauchos. Half of the classes will be in a classroom seminar setting; the other half will take place in the field.

I am a Continuing Lecturer in the UCSB Writing Program. I teach first year writing, upper division writing in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and Community Writing.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94US: Was there an Historical Trojan War?
Professor Ralph Gallucci, Classics
 

Wednesday 100-150
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             63057

Perhaps the most famous story in Greek mythology is the tale of the Trojan War. Until the 1960’s most scholars believed that the Trojan War was an historical event.  Today many scholars deny any reality behind the legend. We will examine why this change has occurred.

Ralph Gallucci received his Ph.D. in Greek and Roman History at UCLA in 1986 and teaches in the Classics Department and Honors Program. Ralph has mentored numerous undergraduate research projects. His publications are in the areas of Athenian democracy and Homeric studies, especially the interconnections of memory, legend, and history.

gallucci@classics.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VA: Responsive and Accessible Web Design
Professor MadeleineSorapure, Writing Program
 

Monday 500-550
SSMS 1005

Enrollment Code:             28472

In this course, you’ll work through the process of creating a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. No prior experience is expected; the course is intended for beginners to web design.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VB: What Can Latin America Teach Us Today About the US?
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesday 6-650
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             28480

“Populism”, “erosion of democracy”, “authoritarianism”, "socialism". These are some expressions we hear nowadays and are used by the media and political leaders to characterize the current situation of the US. Many people see this phenomena as something new or strange, often use these words without much knowledge of their meaning and context. In this seminar we will explore how Latin America—its history, peoples and cultures—may offer a few valuable lessons on how to understand US society and politics today.

I am a professor of Latin American and Comparative literature. My areas of teaching and research include contemporary Latin American literature and culture, history of ideas, critical theory and the relationships between literature, science and technology. I am a native of Venezuela.

juan.lupi@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VC: Great Scientists Speak Again
Professor Stuart Feinstein, MCDB
 

Thursday 1000-1050
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:             63032

This course will have short presentations from great scientists from the past as well as the current day, such as Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel and Jennifer Doudna. These presentations will be accompanied by informal presentations by Professor Feinstein as well as informal discussions among all members of the class.

Dr. Feinstein is a molecular cell biologist and neurobiologist, who did his professional training in the San Francisco Bay Area. His research focuses upon the development of the nervous system and its demise from Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Outside of science, he has a passion for baseball!

feinstei@lifesci.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VO: Hammer Horror
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese
 

Monday 200-250
PHELP 2536

Enrollment Code:             63024

 

Hammer Film Productions was founded in 1934. The company is best known for a series of Gothic horror films made from the mid-1950s until the 1970s. It featured classic horror characters such as Baron Frankenstein, Count Dracula, The Mummy and the Wolf Man, re-introduced to audiences in vivid color for the first time. During their most successful years, Hammer dominated the horror film market, enjoying worldwide distribution and considerable financial success. Yet Hammer Films also ventured successfully in other genres such as Science-Fiction, War Films, Historical Dramas, and Contemporary Thrillers. Hammer's films were considered low brow entertainment back in its day, but its films were immensely popular, not just because of the relatively explicit violence shown on screen but because they made explicit the hitherto concealed sexual subtexts of Gothic horror. The seminar is an overview/ reading of the classic Hammer Films, with an emphasis on the horror genre.

Jorge Luis Castillo (Ph.D. Harvard University, 1995) is a Professor of Spanish American Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published a novel (La estación florida, 1997), two monographs (El lenguaje y la poesía de Julio Herrera y Reissig 1999 and Gris en Azul 2011), and two PEN Club Award winning collection of short stories (La vida vulgar 2004 and La virgen de los boleros). He has also published a variety of articles on Spanish American Romanticism, Modernismo, Posmodernismo, and the Avant-Garde.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VP: Fernando Pessoa: a man of many voices
Professor Andre Sebastiao D. Correa de Sa, Spanish and Portuguese

Day/Time/Location: Wednesday 300-550 in GIRV 1119

Enrollment Code:             63503

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the work of Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), the great Portuguese modernist master. Writing in three languages and under the name of 136 literary characters – to whom he endowed biographies, writing styles, political influences and points of view – Pessoa's achievements can aptly be described as embodying one of the most significant literary legacies of modern literature. By exploring some of his most remarkable works, we will explore ways of using literature to expand our own private perspectives and vocabularies.

I am an Assistant Professor in the Spanish and Portuguese Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. I have wide-ranging interdisciplinary interests in literatures and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world and work within a postcolonial and transnational framework (Portugal, Brazil and Lusophone Africa). Focusing primarily on authors from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, I have written on topics such as psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, romanticism and modernism, colonialism, post-colonialism, and, more recently, environmental humanities.

 

My current core project is a book tentatively entitled Songs for a brutal world: ecology and solidarity in Lusophone literature. Under the banner of environmental criticism and spanning Lusophone fiction and poetry from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, the overall goal of this book is to rethink reading practices by focusing on the way literature evokes the affective, aesthetic and political connections with the environment. My purpose is to urge a revaluation of these texts by showing how literature may improve our connection to the environment. In doing so, I try to bear the idea that literature has an important and long-lasting role in promoting a sense of sustainability and ecological responsibility we should rely upon.

 

Before coming to UCSB I taught at the Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. I teach undergraduate courses in Portuguese and Lusophone African Studies and graduate courses on the relations between literature and environment. I also contribute to the Center for Portuguese Studies at UCSB, which seeks to foster the study of the literatures, language and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world in the US.

acorreadesa@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VQ: Differential Geometry and Topology of DNA
Professor Xianzhe Dai, Mathematics

W 10-11am
KERR 2166

Enrollment Code:             67389

If you've ever seen a picture of a DNA molecule, you probably saw it in its famous B-form: two strands coiling around each other in a right-handed fashion to form a double helix.

The goal pf the seminar is to introduce some geometric and topological tools relevant to the study of the supercoidal structure of the double helix form of DNA.

Xianzhe Dai is a professor of marhematics at UCSB. He received his PhD from Stony Brook University in 1989, and after postdoctral positions at

MIT and Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, he became an assistant professor at USC before moving to UCSB in 1998.

DAI@MATH.UCSB.EDU

 

INT 94VW: Exploration of the Physics major: from curious freshmen to young professionals
Professor Tengiz Bibilashvili, Physics
 

W 500-550
KERR 2166A

Enrollment Code:             72942

The class is designed for students who are majoring in physics. The goal of the seminar is to explain how physics majors get educated and who they become after receiving a BS in physics. Students in the class will build their virtual plan for classes from freshman fall to senior spring. They will also make a plan for doing research at UCSB and beyond. Moreover, students will explore post-BS options. The seminar is mostly discussion based, but there will be some intro presentations by the instructor and invited guests (current students and faculty members)."
 

Dr. B aka Tengiz Bibilashvili earned his Ph. D. at Tbilisi State University. His thesis was about Non-equilibrium Quantum Filed Diagrammatic. Later he focused on teaching physics and he prepared several Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal winners at the International Physics Olympiads. Currently Dr. B is teaching classes and provides academic advice. Most of his students continue their education in top universities or start their career right after graduation with BA in physics.

tbib@physics.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VW: Exploration of the Physics major: from curious freshmen to young professionals
Professor Georgios Koutroulakis, Physics
 

Tuesday 400-450
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             72934

The class is designed for students who are majoring in physics. The goal of the seminar is to explain how physics majors get educated and who they become after receiving a BS in physics. Students in the class will build their virtual plan for classes from freshman fall to senior spring. They will also make a plan for doing research at UCSB and beyond. Moreover, students will explore post-BS options. The seminar is mostly discussion based, but there will be some intro presentations by the instructor and invited guests (current students and faculty members)."

Dr. Koutroulakis, a native of Greece, completed his Ph.D. at Brown University in the field of experimental condensed matter Physics. He then performed postdoctoral research at the Los Alamos National Lab and UCLA, before starting teaching full-time initially at UCLA and now at UCSB.

gkoutrou@physics.ucsb.edu

 

 

Fall 2019 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AFPsychological Science in the world of Game of Thrones
Professor Tamsin GermanPsychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesday 500-550

GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  28738          

This seminar introduces various issues in Psychological Science through the lens of the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, family resemblance, gender roles, how to avoid incest, morality, belief and skepticism, mind-body dualism, concepts of the supernatural, and which character might have what psychological disorder.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 186AJ: School Psychology Jedi Academy:  Supporting Social, Emotional, and Mental Health of Children
Professor Shane Jimerson, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology
 

Monday 12-12:50
ED 1203

Enrollment Code:             28746

School psychologists have expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This seminar introduces how school psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and others to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments. Fieldwork opportunities also included. May the force be with you!

Professor Shane Jimerson is a nationally certified school psychologist, and recent President of both National and International School Psychology organizations.        Dr. Jimerson has received numerous awards for his scholarship focused on understanding and promoting the social, emotional, behavioral, academic, and mental health of children.  You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_R._Jimerson

jimerson@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AS: Fitness & Wellness Leadership
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise & Sport Studies
 

Wednesday 1100-1150
Recen 2103

Enrollment Code:             63065

This seminar will explore concepts of fitness.  Students will receive basic instruction in exercise science and practical application of concepts.  The knowledge will allow students to explore the field of fitness and wellness with emphasis on assessment application, exercise development and program design.

Amy Jamieson is the Department Chair and faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise & Sports Studies.  She has over 20 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.  Her broad education and experience in the field provides students with numerous fieldwork and hands-on internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amyjam@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AW: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance
 

Tuesday 500-550
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             63040

Students will explore the phenomenon of collecting--its history, psychology, economics, and cultural significance--with particular emphasis on the creative applications of collecting, including artistic practices and existential reflections. All students will be expected to start or continue a collection.

In addition to being a noted theater historian, Professor King is a prodigious collector and an expert on collecting. His book Collections of Nothing is part memoir/part essay on the phenomenon of collecting, and it was called one of the 100 best books of 2008 by amazon.com. He has continued his study of collecting with Tree of Life (TM), a performance piece with cereal boxes.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AX: What Psychotherapists Do: Exploring Psychotherapy as a Field and a Career
Professor Andraes Consoli, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Wednesday 200-250
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:             63495

You have heard of psychotherapy; you have seen it in movies and TV. Now you are interested in knowing more about it: who conducts it, what it takes, and can this be a career for me? Come learn about the myths and realities of psychotherapy through process, outcome, and multicultural research.

Associate professor, Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology, UCSB; distinguished visiting professor of psychology, Universidad del Valle, Guatemala; professor, SFSU (1997-2013). Fellow, American Psychological Association (Division 52: International Psychology, Division 29: Psychotherapy). President (2014), National Latinx Psychological Association; President (2007-2009), Interamerican Society of Psychology. Lead Coeditor, Comprehensive Textbook of Psychotherapy (2017).

aconsoli@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AY: K-Pop and Cultural Technology
Professor Sowon Park, English

Monday 4-450
GIRV 2108

Enrollment Code:             67405

This seminar will introduce the concept of 'Cultural Technology' as pioneered by K-Pop. Students will learn to read Korean through K-Pop lyrics (by BTS and Big Bang*), learn one K-Pop choreography (Move by Taemin*) and consider the social implications of a globalized digital fan culture. (*material is subject to change)

 

Some background in dance is recommended though not essential

Dr. Sowon S Park (DPhil Oxford) specializes in British Modernism, Political Fiction, World Literature, and the relationship between Literature and other forms of knowledge, in particular Cognitive Neuroscience. Before coming to UCSB, she was Lecturer in English at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Her previous academic appointments were at Cambridge University and Ewha University, Seoul. She has also held visiting appointments at UCSD and ZFL, Geisteswissenschaftliche Zentren, Berlin. Her latest blog is on cultural technology and K-pop - 'BTS and Fan Translation': https://www.creativeml.ox.ac.uk/blog/exploring-multilingualism/korean-pop-bts-and-fan-translation 

sowonpark@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AZ: Meet and Greet Your "Natural" Neighbors: Introduction to Flora and Fauna around UCSB
Professor Claudia Tyler, College of Creative Studies 

3 Friday afternoons: Oct 11 (1-4pm), Oct 18 (1-5pm), Oct 25 (1-4pm)
First class will meet on Oct 11th (30min) in the - Transfer Center Conference Room

Enrollment Code:             67397

In this field-based seminar we will spend all our time outdoors, getting to know the non-human members of the communities around us. We will learn about the ecology and natural history of plant and animal species on campus, travel to UC’s Coal Oil Point Reserve to see intertidal, sandy beach, and slough habitats, and visit UC’s Sedgwick Reserve in the Santa Ynez Valley to observe oak woodlands and grasslands.

Claudia Tyler is a lecturer in the College of Creative Studies. She teaches biology courses including ecology, conservation biology, science ethics, and physiology of stress. Her research focuses on dynamics of shrubland and oak woodland communities. She greatly enjoys introducing students to the natural history and biodiversity of our region.

tyler@ucsb.edu

 

 

 

Spring 2019 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AE: Trust
Professor Norah Dunbar, Communications
Professor Kevin Moore, Writing Program
Professor James Frew, Bren School

Mondays and Wednesdays
0930-1045
KERR 2166B

Enrollment Code:             27391

How do you know if people or data are trustworthy? Trust represents an expectation of honesty and credibility; it allows us to work collaboratively with others. From the perspectives of Communication, Environmental Informatics, and Rhetoric and Writing, this course will examine trust in both people and information that defines social and professional life. Our primary goal will be to examine the nature of trust from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Dr. Dunbar is a Professor of Communication at UCSB. She teaches courses in nonverbal and interpersonal communication, communication theory, and deception detection.  She was the Principal Investigator of a $5.4 Million contract from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity in 2011-2013 and has had her research funded by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and the Center for Identification Technology Research. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has presented over 90 papers at National and International conferences. Her research has appeared in top journals in her discipline including Communication Research, Communication Monographs, and Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication as well as interdisciplinary journals such as Journal of Management Information Systems and Computers in Human Behavior.

Kevin Moore is a Lecturer in the Writing Program, where he teaches a range of courses, including Writing 105R (Rhetoric), Writing 109F (Film), Writing 105PD (Public Discourse), and Writing 105C (Creative Nonfiction). He also teaches in the Engineering writing sequence. He holds an MA in English from the University of Arizona, and a PhD in English from UCLA. His research interests include the rhetoric of creativity, archive studies, propaganda, and American intellectual history. He also writes fiction and creative nonfiction. His work has appeared journals and magazines including Literature of the Americas, Arizona Quarterly, Composition Studies, Writing on the Edge, MAKE, and Souciant, as well as a number of edited collections.  He writes fiction and creative nonfiction, and regularly contributes film reviews to the Santa Barbara Independent.

James Frew is an Associate Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. He teaches graduate courses in computer programming, scientific data management, and geographic information systems. He has a PhD in geography and has published research on remote sensing, image processing, massive distributed data systems, digital libraries, computational provenance, science data archives, and array databases. He currently advises the UCSB Library on research data curation, and has research funding for data citation (NSF) and satellite image databases (Intel Corp.)

ndunbar@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 89AJ: Socioecological Landscapes of I.V.
Professor Ann-Elise Lewallen, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies
Professor Jeffrey Hoelle, Anthropology

Wednesdays
0200-0350
GIRV 2119

Enrollment Code:             57109

Discover the hidden world that surrounds us, as shaped by human and natural forces, from early indigenous peoples to students today. Through guided walks from UCSB campus to IV and Elwood Bluffs and discussions with local experts, students will gain a deeper understanding of these socio-ecological landscapes.

Professor Lewallen's research focuses on critical Indigenous studies, energy policy, and environmental justice in contemporary Japan and India. She has worked with Indigenous communities in Japan (Ainu peoples) and in India (Adivasi peoples), on development, gender, and grassroots resistance movements. She is the author of The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity and Gender in Settler Colonial Japan (2016).

Jeffrey Hoelle is a cultural anthropologist who studies human-environment interactions in the Amazon Rainforest of Brazil.  His current research focuses on everyday forms of nature control and the logic of environmentally destructive practices in Amazonia, with a focus on gold mining, cattle raising, and beef consumption.  Professor Hoelle is the author of Rainforest Cowboys: the rise of ranching and cattle culture in western Amazonia.

alewal@ucsb.edu

INT 89AK: What's Next: Career Planning in the Arts and Humanities
Professor Rebecca Powers, French and Italian
Professor Ignacio Gallardo, Career Services

Tuesdays
0500-0650
GIRV 2112

Enrollment Code:             57117

This course introduces students to important factors involved in major and career decision-making. With practical sessions from Career Services Counselors and guest lectures by professionals (from fields like business, tech, and medicine), students learn how a humanities major may lead to a rewarding career and how they can begin to prepare.

Rebecca Powers, PhD is a Lecturer in the Department of French and Italian and Associate Director of Curricular Initiatives in the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. She strives to help student understand that the analysis of art, literature, philosophy, history and other forms of humanistic study are both fun and important to life outside of the classroom. 

Ignacio Gallardo is Director of Career Services, where he helps students at all stages of the career development process, from exploration to negotiation. He is an expert in professional development and of the different tools students need to make good career decisions, connect with employers, develop their brand, and attain their life goals. He specializes in the use of new technologies and social media to develop a professional online presence.

rtp@ucsb.edu

INT 89AG: Horror in Fiction and Films
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Eloi Grasset, Spanish and Portuguese

Mondays
0900-1050 (NEW TIME)
PHELPS 2524 (NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code:             27417

This course will explore the avatars of the horror story in 19th and narrative and its legacy in 20th century short prose and films. As an extreme form of anti-realistic representation, horror stories are able to subvert the arbitrary, frail nature of modern culture and rational, fact-based roots to expose instead the hidden, elemental impulses that rule human emotions. This seminar will situate horror stories and films with their cultural and artistic contexts facilitating thus student participation and in-class discussion.

Jorge Luis Castillo (Ph.D. Harvard University, 1995) is a Professor of Spanish American Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published a novel (La estación florida, 1997), two monographs (El lenguaje y la poesía de Julio Herrera y Reissig 1999 and Gris en Azul 2011), and two PEN Club Award winning collection of short stories (La vida vulgar 2004 and La virgen de los boleros). He has also published a variety of articles on Spanish American Romanticism, Modernismo, Posmodernismo, and the Avant-Garde.

Eloi Grasset is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at University of California - Santa Barbara. In the recent past he has held positions at Harvard University and University of Barcelona. He graduated from the department of Iberian and Latin American Studies at Universite de la Sorbonne and his dissertation is focused on the language change (Spanish/Catalan) that takes place in the poetic work of Pere Gimferrer. His thesis discusses whether this change of language necessarily implies a change of style in his works. He also carries out a computational stylometric analysis of the linguistic patterns in Pere Gimferrer’s work (considering both lexical and phrasal aspects).  
The results of his research have been published in different books and indexed journals: (e.g. Necesitar Devenir Minoritario: sexualidad, territorio y escritura; Memòria i símptoma: ficció i subjecte dins l’espai autobiogràfic). Moreover, in his postdoctoral research, he opened up other research lines that have primarily focused on Film Studies and Comparative Literature.  His current projects include bilingualism in literature with a focus on authors writing in a second language, autobiography and Digital Humanities.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

Spring 2019 - First Year Exploration Seminars

 

INT 94FH: Breaking the Mold: How the Movies Can Break Through Stereotypes of People with Disabilities
Professor George Singer, Education

Tuesdays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:             27433

In this seminar students will view scenes from movies that challenge negative societal stereotypes about people with disabilities by replacing them through effective empathetic story telling. We will discuss the status of people with disabilities in the contemporary US and how the disability rights movement is fighting for change. In addition to studying how disability stereotypes are challenged in recent movies, we will look at the ways that the art of filmmaking is used to deliver richer understandings of fellow citizens with disabilities. 

George Singer has been a Professor of Special Education at UCSB since 1995. He educates special education credential students and doctoral students. His research has been focused on children with severe disabilities and their families. He is very interested in the way society constructs disability and treats people who have physical, intellectual, or emotional differences from the norm. Professor Singer has been a special education teacher and has family members with disabilities. The way movies and television can help elevate the status of people with disabilities is a major interest.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94VI: Displaced: Literature of Migration
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Wednesdays
0200-0250
SH 2617 (NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code:             59600

At the time of an epochal exodus from the South to the North of the world, this seminar studies migration in twentieth and twenty-first century novels. We will focus on the condition of the cosmopolitan traveler, the immigrant, and the migrant to discuss the effects of the migrant's new, different culture.  Novels by Nella Larsen, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Amara Lakhous, and Mohsin Ahmed and others.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and Feminist Studies at UCSB. Her research and teaching focuses on questions of modern and postmodern literature and culture, travel and migration, critical space and urban studies. She is the author of Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century, and   Stuff Theory: Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism (2014)

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94VL: Climate Change: What It Is and What Each Of Us Can Do About It
Professor Ken Hiltner, English

Fridays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             69492

This course considers the cultural implications of climate change. We will be considering how a range of everyday practices (such as those encouraged by the automobile, fashion, and beef industries) are changing our planet's climate.

Professor Ken Hiltner is the Director of the Environmental Humanities Initiative (EHI) at UCSB. He has appointments in the English and Environmental Studies Departments. Dr. Hiltner’s principal interest is in the cultural implications of climate change. In addition to UCSB, he has taught at Harvard, where he earned his Ph.D., and at Princeton.

hiltner@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Werner Kuhn, Geography and Center for Spatial Studies

Wednesdays
0300-0350
PHELPS 3512

Enrollment Code:                             61820

Students learn about the fascinating variety of spatial thinking (and sometimes spatial computing) in the arts and sciences. Each week, a guest lecturer from a different department introduces a particular perspective on space (such as that of architecture, dance and choreography, or public health) and, in readings, discussions, small experiments, and essays, lets students explore spatial reasoning for problem solving (sciences and engineering), creative expression (arts), or interpretation (humanities).

Dr. Werner Kuhn is a professor of geography, specializing in geographic information. He has researched and taught on the design and use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for 36 years, with an emphasis on the usability of these systems as well as of the information they deliver. His recent research and that of his graduate students asks whether there are a few core concepts with which we understand geographic environments and build computer models of them.

werner.kuhn@gmail.com

INT 94QX: What White People Need to Know
Professor Paul Spickard, History

Mondays
0300-0350
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             54148

We live in a racialized society.  Every social encounter is tinged by race.  Some (mainly White) people experience privilege and others (mostly not White) are penalized on account of race.  Many people don't feel comfortable talking about these issues.  In this seminar we will talk about our experiences of race and seek ways to make things better.

I'm a White guy who came up in Black, Asian, and Polynesian neighborhoods and who has been teaching and writing about race for forty years.  I've written twenty books and maybe eighty articles on the subject.

spickard@history.ucsb.edu

***ON CAMPUS EVENTS***
INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Thursdays
0400-0450
MUSIC 2224
~and~
Concerts
UCSB Wind Ensemble on Thursday, May 30, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
UCSB Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players on Monday, June 3, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
UCSB Jazz Ensemble on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
UCSB Gospel Choir on Friday, June 7, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
All events are free to UCSB students with ID

Enrollment Code:             27557

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

Felber@ucsb.edu

INT 94VN: Rock Docs
Professor David Novak, Music

Tuesdays (5 weeks only: April 2, 9, 16, 23 and May 7)
0700-0950pm
MUSIC 2406 - NEW LOCATION!

Enrollment Code:             75176

This seminar is a brief introduction to music documentary film, focusing on the rock genre from the 1960s until the present. Each week we will screen and discuss films by groundbreaking filmmakers, including D.A. Pennebaker and the Maysles Brothers, and discuss the ways thee films represent the lives of artists such as Bob Dylan to Amy Winehouse in the mediated context of rock history.  This course meets for five discussion sections, each running for 3 hours.

I am an Associate Professor in the Music Department, who teaches ethnomusicology, media studies, anthropology, and issues around the global circulation of popular media.

dnovak09@ucsb.edu

INT 94VJ: God Doesn't Exist and You Have No Free Will
Professor Daniel Korman, Philosophy    

Mondays
1200-1250
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             59618

Each week, we’ll examine an argument for a radical or controversial conclusion, including: that God does not exist, that you have no free will, that you don’t know anything, that it’s irrational to fear death, that abortion is immoral, that eating meat is immoral, and that taxation is immoral.

Professor Korman joined the faculty at UCSB in 2017, after ten years teaching at the University of Illinois. His primary interests are in metaphysics, metaethics, the philosophy of mind and language, and the theory of knowledge.

dkorman@ucsb.edu

INT 94QD: Studying Abroad
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             27516

This seminar is designed to prepare students for studying abroad as undergraduates at UCSB.  We will cover a variety of topics related to this topic:  program options, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, overcoming challenges, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus draft an application/scholarship essay.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His research interests include modern pilgrimages, Islam and Modernity, modern Islamic movements, and religion and the culinary cultures of the Middle East.  Among his most recent publications is the Encyclopedia of Islam (Facts on File, 2009), which is now going into a second expanded edition.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

campo@ucsb.edu

INT 94VM: Advocating for Scholars at Risk
Professor Kathleen Moore, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
0300-0350
HSSB 3041

Enrollment Code:             70839

In collaboration with the organization Scholars at Risk Network (SAR) we will work as the case responsible entity for a Saudi feminist facing unjust restrictions, prosecution, or imprisonment for her ideas. With the assistance of SAR, we will continue to work on the case of Dr. Hatoon al-Fassi, a female professor in Saudi Arabia, who was selected from SAR's list of imprisoned or persecuted scholars. We will develop an advocacy strategy to help raise consciousness and work towards the release of this person from prison or from persecution. To these ends, we will discuss and compare pertinent notions of academic freedom and free speech, conduct background research on the region, including historical, political, legal and economic aspects pertaining to the case.

Moore is a Religious Studies professor with expertise in Islam in America and law and religion. She is currently writing a book entitled Shari'a Revoiced: California Muslims Speak About Islamic Law. She frequently serves as an expert witness in litigation regarding religious expression and workplace discrimination. Her publications appear in The Oxford Handbook of American Islam, The Cambridge Companion to American Islam, The Routledge Handbook of Islam in the West, and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. Her books include The Unfamiliar Abode: Islamic Law in the United States and Britain (Oxford University Press, 2010); Muslim Women in America: Challenges facing Islamic Identity Today (Oxford University Press, 2011); and Al-Mughtaribun: American Law and the Transformation of Muslim Life in America (SUNY Press, 1995).

kmoore@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:             27466

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

***LAB***
INT 94UT: Oral Interpreting: Hands On!
Professor Aline Alves Ferreira, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays and Wednesdays
0800-0850
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             27623

This course comprises topics that are important to develop skills for interpreting into and from Spanish and/or Portuguese.

Dr. Aline Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She is the director of the Bilingualism, Translation, and Cognition Laboratory and was post-doctoral research fellow in psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. She is the coeditor of the books The Handbook of Translation and Cognition (Wiley Blackwell), The Development of Translation Competence: Theories and Methodologies from Psycholinguistics and Cognitive Science, (Cambridge Scholars Publishing), and Psycholinguistic and cognitive inquiries into translation and interpreting (John Benjamins. Professor Ferreira has also published studies in journals and books such as Translation and Interpreting Studies, Translation, Cognition and Behavior, Spanish Journal of Applied Linguistics, Cognitive control and consequences of multilingualism (John Benjamins Publishing), Reading and Writing (Springer), Intersections of language and social justice (International Society for Language Studies, Inc.), and The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Linguistics (Routledge) (among others). Ferreira has created and taught the seminar, "Oral Interpreting: Hands On!" and the upper-division courses, "Translation" and "Interpreting" and she is revamping some of the traditional courses (e.g. Bilingualism).

aferreira@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94VH: Feminist Thinking and Activism in 20th-21st Century Spain
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Tuesdays
0100-0250
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code:             59592

The purpose of this Exploration seminar is to familiarize students with the feminist cultural history of Contemporary Spain taking into account its diverse geopolitical areas and languages--including Catalonia, Galicia, and the Basque Country.  Particular attention will be paid to the work of women filmmakers and to issues such as Gender Violence and Grassroots Movements.

Professor Bermudez' areas of research and teaching are the cultural productions (especially literature and music) of the Iberian Peninsula, Equatorial Guinea, and Latin America, particularly Peru. Her critical work focuses on migration studies, feminism, women's studies, poetic discourses, and politics. One of her 2018 publications is the co-edited volume “A New History of Iberian Feminisms” (University of Toronto Press).

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             54130

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

***LAB***
INT 94VD: Puppet Design and Fabrication
Professor Christina McCarthy, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays
0100-0150
HSSB 1105

Enrollment Code:             54171

Build your own rod style puppet while immersing yourself in learning about various building techniques translatable to many puppet styles including shadow puppets, marionettes, and large scale parade puppets. Each student will design and fabricate their own puppet and have the opportunity to delve into simple mechanisms for realistic body movement.

Christina McCarthy is a multimedia artist working in dance, theater, puppetry and film, embracing all of these forms as she seeks to tell stories in innovative ways. As a former student of Engineering, she decodes the mechanisms to give puppets realistic movement qualities with rudimentary building materials. She is a maker of animated performance space.

cmccarthy@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94TW: Food Writing: The Good, the Bad, and the Distasteful
Professor Katie Baillargeon, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0300-0350
GIRV 2135

Enrollment Code:             54155

Tasty videos by Buzzfeed, food blogs, #Instafood, Yelp: all demonstrate how food writing has grown beyond its traditional cookbook and review genres. This seminar explores various visual and textual genres of food writing and, via select readings, emphasizes how to write about food and understand the issues most current in the field.

Katie Baillargeon has a PhD in Musicology from UCSB and has taught in the Writing Program since 2008. Personally, she is fascinated by our cultural focus on food and has themed several research writing courses around food. She also used to sell her homemade cheesecakes in high school.

baillargeon@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Politics
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing Program

Tuesdays
1100-1150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             27581

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Robert Samuels has doctorates in Psychology and English.  He teaches in the UCSB writing program and is the author of 11 books, including Why Public Higher education Should be Free and Educating Inequality.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

INT 94VA: Create a RARE website: Responsive, Accessible, Rhetorically Effective Web Design Made (Sort of) Easy
Professor Madeleine Sorapure, Writing Program

Mondays
0400-0450
PHELP 1518

Enrollment Code:             54163

The class is intended for beginners who don't know HTML or CSS but would like to learn; no experience with web design is necessary. In this course, you'll create a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. The website can grow and evolve along with you over the next four years, as you add writing, images, video, and other elements that convey your knowledge, skills, and interests. You'll learn some basic HTML and CSS in order to modify templates and learn strategies for making your site responsive on different devices, accessible to a range of users, and rhetorically effective in conveying your content.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

Spring 2019 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AJ: School Psychology Jedi Academy: Supporting Social, Emotional, and Mental Health of Children
Professor Shane Jimerson, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Mondays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:             54122

School psychologists have expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This seminar introduces how school psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and others to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments. Fieldwork also included. May the force be with you!

Professor Shane Jimerson is a nationally certified school psychologist, and recent President of both National and International School Psychology organizations. Dr. Jimerson has received numerous awards for his scholarship focused on understanding and promoting the social, emotional, behavioral, academic, and mental health of children.  You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_R._Jimerson

Jimerson@ucsb.edu

INT 186AS: Fitness Leadership
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise & Sport Studies

Fridays
1000-1050
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:             56895

This seminar will explore concepts of fitness.  Students will receive basic instruction in exercise science and practical application of concepts.  The knowledge will allow students to explore the field of fitness and wellness with emphasis on exercise development and program design.

Amy Jamieson is the Department Chair and faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise & Sports Studies.  She has over 20 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.  Her broad education and experience in the field provides students with numerous fieldwork and hands-on internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amyjam@ucsb.edu

INT 186AF: Psychological Science in the World of Game of Thrones
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
0500-0550
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             27755

This seminar introduces various issues in Psychological Science through the lens of the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, family resemblance, gender roles, religious belief and skepticism, the mind-body problem, concepts of the supernatural, how to avoid incest, and which character might have what psychological disorder.

Tamsin German is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her research concerns the cognitive foundations of the human capacity for understanding other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thinking, such as how we represent and reason about supernatural entities like Gods and ghosts.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 186AU: Key Concepts in Psychology
Professor Stanley Klein, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Mondays
0100-0150
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             59584

In this seminar we will take a critical look at many of the conceptually underdeveloped constructs that populate psychological science.  Particular attention will be given to exactly what we intend by terms such as Self, Memory, Mind, Consciousness.  In addition, we will ask whether Psychology is a science and if not, whether it should be?

Professor Klein earned his BS at Stanford and his PHd at Harvard. 

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

Spring 2019 - Transfer Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 187AF: Ocean Memory
Professor Melody Jue, English
Professor Alyson Santoro, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Tuesdays
0300-0450
GIRV 2120

Enrollment Code:             57042

This seminar explores new ways to study the ocean through the framework of “memory.” How might the ocean be said to “remember” its past? Do communities of organisms (or microorganisms) retain
memories” of past events, in order to anticipate and respond to future challenges? Understanding how memory exists for a particular ecosystem provides a powerful foundation for asking an important additional question: where and when might disruptions of memory in the ocean occur? Do communities in the ocean experience dementia or memory loss? This seminar will blend perspectives from science and the humanities to explore these questions.

Melody Jue is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests include ocean & environmental humanities, science fiction, media, and science & technology studies. Drawing on the experience of becoming a scuba diver, her current book project, ""Wild Blue Media: Thinking Through Seawater"" (forthcoming with Duke Press), aims to develop a theory of mediation specific to the ocean environment. It not only expands the definition of media to include natural elements ”like seawater” but also closely examines the conceptual language of media theory.

Alyson Santoro is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. Her research focuses on the role of microbes in marine ecosystems. She is interested in cultivating new microbes and discovering novel ways of tracking their activity. A particular focus of her lab is the marine archaea, a largely uncultured group of microbes. In pursuit of her research, she has spent nearly a year of her life at sea including expeditions to Micronesia, Cuba, and the Equatorial Pacific. Findings from her recent research include the discovery that archaea in the ocean can make the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and that some marine archaea have exceptionally small genomes.

mjue@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AG: Central American Odysseys (1970-2020)
Professor Charles Hale, Dean of Social Sciences

Tuesdays
0500-0650 pm
GIRV 1112

Enrollment Code:             67934

Since 2015, UC Santa Barbara has proudly maintained our status as a ‘Hispanic Serving Institution.’ A significant, but unspecified, number of these students are sure to be of Central American heritage. Although there are similarities among all Hispanic (or Latinx) students, varying national origins are important for many reasons. In this seminar we will work toward an understanding of the social identity ‘Central American-American,’ starting with the study of the societies from which they have come, with a special emphasis on Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua. Our point of departure will be the ‘revolutionary era’ in Central America (1960s-70s) a time of great hope for egalitarian social transformation, ultimately crushed by political, economic and military elites, with ample backing from the United States. Our first objective will be to place the current crisis (desperate societal conditions, migration to the north, etc.) in historical perspective, by exploring this hypothesis: we are reaping now the consequences of seeds sown 50 years ago, during the revolutionary era. Our second objective is to explore cultural-political conditions in these societies today, going beyond the headlines of violence and economic distress. The third and final objective is to deepen our understanding of Central American-American experiences close to home, in California and on the UC Santa Barbara campus. Students with Central American backgrounds and command of Spanish are especially encouraged to enroll in this seminar.

Dean of Social Sciences, Dr. Hale is an anthropologist specializing in Central American cultural politics.

crhale@ucsb.edu

 

Winter 2019 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AA: Latin American Culture: From Conquest to Independence
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0100-0250
GIRV 2116

Enrollment Code:             62216   

This class will present an overview of the literature and culture of Latin America through the analysis of some of the most relevant works written in the last five centuries across the Americas. It will also present an overview of the most salient aspects of Latin American identity.

Professor of Medieval and Early Modern literature, history, and culture, Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. Dr. Cortijo is the author of over 50 books and 150 articles.

Professor Castillo's areas of instruction and research include: Nineteenth and twentieth-century Spanish-American literature, from the Romantics to the Avant-Garde, with a special focus on Hispanic Modernismo and Posmodernismo. Additional areas of interest are: poetry and poetics; modern philosophy and history of ideas; contemporary literary theory; Cuban and Puerto Rican literature; nineteenth century Peninsular, and contemporary Spanish-American literature.

cortijo@ucsb.edu

INT 89AD: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Stephen Poole, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Professor Craig Carlson, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Fridays
0200-0350
GIRV 2129

Enrollment Code:             28738   

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology.  Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Professor Poole earned his B.A. at Trinity College, and his Ph.D. in molecular biology at UCSD. His research areas are the molecular genetics of animal development, focusing on genes involved in development of external sense organs in Drosophila, and also contact-dependent growth inhibition in bacteria. Dr. Poole is a former Chair of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology.

Dr. Carlson earned his BA degree at Colby College and his PhD in marine science at the University of Maryland where he investigated the role that marine microbes play in governing the carbon cycle of open ocean ecosystems. As a Postdoctoral scholar at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) he focused on the biogeochemistry of dissolved organic matter in ocean systems. He joined BIOS faculty in 1996 and remained there until joining EEMB in 2001. Dr. Carlson is a former Chair of EEMB and is a member of UCSB's Marine Science Institute. He is lead PI or Co-PI on several federally sponsored projects in Microbial Oceanography.

poole@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Winter 2019 - First Year Exploration Seminars

INT 94FH: Breaking the Mold: How the Movies Can Break Through Stereotypes of People with Disabilities
Professor George Singer, Education

Tuesdays
1200-1250
ED 4205

Enrollment Code:             28746                   

In this seminar students will view scenes from movies that challenge negative societal stereotypes about people with disabilities by replacing them through effective empathetic story telling. We will discuss the status of people with disabilities in the contemporary US and how the disability rights movement is fighting for change. In addition to studying how disability stereotypes are challenged in recent movies, we will look at the ways that the art of filmmaking is used to deliver richer understandings of fellow citizens with disabilities

Professor Singer has been teaching in Special Education at UCSB since 1995. He educates special education credential students and doctoral students. His research has been focused on children with severe disabilities and their families. Dr. Singer is very interested in the way society constructs disability and treats people who have physical, intellectual, or emotional differences from the norm. He has been a special education teacher and has family members with disabilities. The way movies and television can help elevate the status of people with disabilities is a major interest.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             28761                   

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Professor Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0200-0250
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             28779   

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot's fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94MH: Great Love Requires Great Risks:  Social Movements, Sacrifice, and Radical Activism
Professor Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval, Chicana/o Studies

1ST 5 Tuesdays
0900-1050
SH 1623

Enrollment Code:             65771

This seminar will explore what makes people move; in other words, what causes them to get involved in a social movement and then take ever increasing risks, including sacrificing potentially one's life.  Special focus will be on activists that rely on hunger strikes, civil disobedience, and other "extreme" strategies to create a more just world.  We will also examine what we can do, as students, faculty, and everyday people to stop injustice and suffering.

Professor Armbruster-Sandoval has been teaching the Chicana/o Studies Department since 1998.  His research focuses on social movements, racial studies, and globalization.  He has published two books and long been involved in activist organizations.  He is currently working on a new book on the Chicana/o Movement in Los Angeles after the end of the Vietnam War.

ralpharmbruster@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah deVries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Tuesdays
1000-1150
PSBN 4606

Enrollment Code:             65300

Gallup Polls show that two thirds of Americans do not think global warming is a threat and almost half of all Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should we really worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternative medicine really quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say?  Should schools and universities teach all sides of these controversies? Explore the history, politics, and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana and Chicano Studies

1st 6 Mondays (NEW DAY)
0900-1050 (NEW TIME)
HSSB 3202 (NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code:             28787   

This seminar will consist of showing film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino experience in historical perspective.   Professor Garcia will discuss the historical context of each film.  After the film is shown, students will share their reflections on it.

Mario Garcia is a Distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He has published numerous books on Chicano history including on immigration, civil rights, leadership, labor, and faith politics as well as an expert on oral history.  Dr. Garcia teaches courses on Chicano history, autobiography, religion, and Introduction to Chicano Studies.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

***LAB***
INT 94OU: LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays (new day)
0400-0450
TD-W 2517 (new location)

Enrollment Code:             28795

LAUNCH PAD is the new play development program at UCSB's Department of Theater and Dance. With the playwright in residence, we produce a "preview production" of a new play each year. Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development. Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers in class, observe rehearsals and see the performance to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage.

Risa Brainin, Professor and freelance director. Directorial credits include plays at American Players Theatre, Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatre Festival and more. Artistic Director of UCSB's LAUNCH PAD. www.risabrainin.com

rbrainin@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From the Page to the Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             62224

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94QC: Politics and Film
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Wednesdays
0900-0950
GIRV 2110

Enrollment Code:             62232

In this course we shall discuss ten films that have a strong political theme or themes.  These shall include Frank Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Don Siegel's Invasion of the Body Snatchers, King Vidor's The Fountainhead, and Ridley Scott's Blade Runner.  Student evaluation will be based upon class participation and short viewer-response analyses.  Essays are due noon the day before class; they should be submitted via e-mail to the address provided. They should, in no more than one page, identify two questions about the week's film that the student would like to address in class, and explain about each (a) why it seems particularly important and (b) why its answer is so unclear as to require discussion.

Professor Andrew Norris generally teaches and writes political philosophy, though he has also published on aesthetics and film.  He is the author of Becoming Who We Are: Politics and Practical Philosophy in the Work of Stanley Cavell (Oxford University Press, 2017) and over thirty articles.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Campus Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise and Sports Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:             28811

This seminar is designed to explore elements of health and wellness.  Class meetings will introduce students to a variety of campus resources and activities that promote a healthy lifestyle.  Topics include making healthy food choices, stress management, fitness activities, adventure program activities and personal health assessments.

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy's education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TF: Dedicated to Serve: Local Law Enforcement Uncensored
Professor Gina Genova, Writing Program

1st 6 Wednesdays
0400-0550
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:             28829

With media, politicians, athletes and quasi-celebrities provoking anti-law enforcement sentiment, it's easy to second-guess policies and practices from the comfort of your own home. Intelligent citizens know that they should inform themselves with accurate facts from the source before reaching a conclusion on such issues. This seminar will facilitate that process through a series of talks from five local law enforcement agencies. Members from each branch of law enforcement will explain their function and fit within Santa Barbara County and what life is like for them as members of this community on and off duty. Direct interaction between students and speakers will follow as students ask class-created questions with time for general discussion in a mutually respectful, safe, and candid atmosphere. Safety tips and career insights are also highlighted.

Gina L. Genova, Esq. teaches Writing for Public Speaking (105PS), Business Writing (107B), and Legal Writing (107L). Her research interests range from the function and process of collaborative work in business spaces to the intersection, interference, and imposition of laws on the workplace environment. She has been a member of the California State and Federal Bars since 1992 and retired in 2015 from her local legal practice specializing in contract, small business and personal injury law.

genova@writing.ucsb.edu

***ONSITE EVENTS***
INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Tuesday, February 19, 2019 (Lecture)
0400-0450
MUSIC 2224

UCSB An Evening of Chamber Music and Dance
Saturday, February 23, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Wind Ensemble
Thursday, March 7, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Music Faculty Showcase 
Monday, March 11, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Jazz Ensemble
Wednesday, March 13, 2019
7:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Enrollment Code:             28845

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required. Please note that all events are free to UCSB students with ID who are enrolled in the course.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

***EXCURSION***
INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist Art, Literature and Culture from Picasso to Ai Weiwei
Professor Enda Duffy, English

1st 3 Fridays
1000-1150
GIRV 2110
~and~
Saturday, January 26, 2019 excursion to Santa Barbara Art Museum

Enrollment Code:             62240

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed. This course surveys these changes with a focus on London/Paris, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine Blast. This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature, and then asks: what has happened to art since?   We then spend a half-day together interacting with some impressionist, modernist, and contemporary art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum.

Enda Duffy is the Arnhold Presidential Department Chair of the Englsih Dept. He teaches courses in twentieth century literature and culture, critical theory, Irish literature, and James Joyce.  His most recent book was 'The Speed Handbook: Velocity, Pleasure, Modernism.'  He has completed a book on emigration and literature, and is at work on one on energy, stress and adrenaline in modern culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED/FIELD TRIP INCLUDED***
INT 94UI: When Paintings Talk: Poetry About Visual Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Tuesdays
1000-1050
GIRV 1106

Enrollment Code:             65730

We will read poems that engage is ekphrasis, descriptions of works of art, and discuss what happens when art finds its voice. Poems by Keats, Auden, Ashbery, Willams, and Hollander, and visual art works by Breughel, Turner, and Parmigianino, among others, will deepen our perspective on how visual art interacts with its viewers, the world, and other art forms. Students will be expected to read two or three poems in relation to several visual images each week while briefly recording their responses in a reading journal. We will also go on a field trip to the Santa Barbara Museum of Art to encounter works of visual art directly.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Politics (formerly The Future of Global Justice)
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing

Tuesdays
1200-1250
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             28878

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Robert Samuels has doctorates in Psychology and English.  He teaches in the UCSB writing program and is the author of 11 books, including Why Public Higher Education Should be Free and Educating Inequality.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

INT 94UP: "We Are Gauchos": Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor Kathleen Patterson, Writing Program

1st 5 Mondays
1200-0150
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             28886

This seminar explores campus and Isla Vista sites, artifacts, and practices illustrating how what we remember and forget about our shared past shapes who we are in the present. Field observation and archival research informed by readings from memory studies and local history will be used to examine who we are as "Gauchos."

Kathy Patterson is a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. Her interest in memory studies stems from her doctoral work in Southern Studies and Disability Studies. She teaches a memory themed entry-level writing course and an upper division Humanities writing course focused on collective memory, commemoration, and memorialization.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94US: Was There a Historical Trojan War?
Professor Ralph Gallucci, Classics

Tuesdays
0900-0950
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             76927

Perhaps the most famous story in Greek mythology is the tale of the Trojan War. Until the 1960’s most scholars believed that the Trojan War was an historical event.  Today many scholars deny any reality behind the legend. We will examine why this change has occurred.

Ralph Gallucci received his Ph.D. in Greek and Roman History at UCLA in 1986 and teaches in the Classics Department and Honors Program. Ralph has mentored numerous undergraduate research projects. His publications are in the areas of Athenian democracy and Homeric studies, especially the interconnections of memory, legend, and history.

gallucci@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94UT: Oral Interpreting: Hands On!
Professor Aline Ferreira, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays and Wednesdays               
0800-0850
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             28910

This course comprises topics that are important to develop skills for interpreting into and from Spanish and/or Portuguese.

Dr. Aline Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She is the director of the Bilingualism, Translation, and Cognition Laboratory. Dr. Ferreira was post-doctoral research fellow in psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. She is the coeditor of the books The Handbook of Translation and Cognition (Wiley Blackwell), The Development of Translation Competence: Theories and Methodologies from Psycholinguistics and Cognitive Science, (Cambridge Scholars Publishing), and Psycholinguistic and cognitive inquiries into translation and interpreting (John Benjamins. She has also published studies in journals and books such as Translation and Interpreting Studies, Translation, Cognition and Behavior, Spanish Journal of Applied Linguistics, Cognitive control and consequences of multilingualism (John Benjamins Publishing), Reading and Writing (Springer), Intersections of language and social justice (International Society for Language Studies, Inc.), and The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Linguistics (Routledge) (among others).

aferreira@spanport.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VA: Create a RARE website: Responsive, Accessible, Rhetorically Effective Web Design Made (Sort of) Easy
Professor Madeleine Sorapure, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0500-0550
SSMS 1005

Enrollment Code:             65870

The class is intended for beginners who don't know HTML or CSS but would like to learn; no experience with web design is necessary. In this course, you'll create a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. The website can grow and evolve along with you over the next four years, as you add writing, images, video, and other elements that convey your knowledge, skills, and interests. You'll learn some basic HTML and CSS in order to modify templates and learn strategies for making your site responsive on different devices, accessible to a range of users, and rhetorically effective in conveying your content.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94VC: Great Scientists Speak Again
Professor Stuart Feinstein, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Wednesdays     
1200-1250
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:             64006

Some of the greatest biologists of all time will make guest presentations, including Charles Darwin (evolution), Gregor Mendel (genetics) and Louis Pasteur (microbiology).  We will also explore some great 20th century biologists, including Watson/Crick/Franklin/Wilkins (DNA), Levi-Montalcini/Cohen (nerve growth factors) and Bishop/Varmus (oncogenes).

Professor Feinstein is a neurobiologist and biochemist whose research focuses upon the development and degeneration of the nervous system, most notably Alzheimer's and related dementias. He also has a passion for history, especially of the sciences, and baseball.

feinstei@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94VD: Puppet Design and Fabrication
Professor Christina McCarthy, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays     
0500-0550
HSSB 1105 (new location)

Enrollment Code:             63990

Build your own rod style puppet while immersing yourself in learning about various building techniques translatable to many puppet styles including shadow puppets, marionettes, and large scale parade puppets. Each student will design and fabricate their own puppet and have the opportunity to delve into simple mechanisms for realistic body movement.

Christina McCarthy is a multimedia artist working in dance, theater, puppetry and film, embracing all of these forms as she seeks to tell stories in innovative ways. As a former student of Engineering, she decodes the mechanisms to give puppets realistic movement qualities with rudimentary building materials. She is a maker of animated performance space.

cmccarthy@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VE: Sensors and Sensing Technology
Professor Hua Lee, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Thursdays
0500-0550
HFH 4164

Enrollment Code:             65524

The course will provide an overview of sensors and sensing technology as well as the applications in the industry and the direct relationships to the engineering curriculum in signal processing, communication, microwave, optics, acoustics, and computer hardware and software systems.

Professor Hua Lee received his BS degree from National Taiwan University in 1974, and MS and Ph.D. degree from UC Santa Barbara in 1978 and 1980 respectively. He returned to UC Santa Barbara in 1990 where he is currently Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Prior to his return to UCSB, he was on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests cover the areas of imaging system optimization, high-performance image formation algorithms, synthetic aperture radar and sonar systems, acoustic microscopy, microwave nondestructive evaluation, tera-hertz imaging, tomographic ground-penetrating radar imaging, and reconfigurable sensing systems.

hualee@ece.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VF: Empowering People Through Collective Theater and Arts
Professor Ruth Hellier-Tinoco, Music

Tuesdays (with extended sessions as noted below)
0500-0550
HSSB 1143

Enrollment Code:             65532

Which strategies and practices of theatre and other arts are useful for empowering people to work collaboratively? This seminar focuses on the work of one playwright and artist in Mexico, Petrona de la Cruz Cruz and one New York based Columbian theater artist, Doris Difarnecio, to explore successful approaches and practices.  The seminar includes readings and workshops with UCSB Professor Hellier-Tinoco and one exceptional visit by the artists Petrona de la Cruz Cruz and Doris Difarnecio.

Extended sessions: some hours on Feb 19 and Feb 20, 2019.

As a creative artist and scholar, Professor Hellier-Tinoco combines interests in performing arts, politics, Mexican studies, identity and environmental issues. Dr. Hellier-Tinoco teaches in the departments of music and theater/dance, with affiliations in feminist studies and Latin American and Iberian Studies, with expertise in experimental performance-making and contemporary politics.

rhellier-tinoco@music.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VG: Collaborating To Build An Interactive Media Design
Professor Greg Mitchell, Theater and Dance

1st 5 TUE
0300-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             73866

In this course the students and instructor will work in a hands on fashion to create a piece of interactive multimedia art which will be on public display on the campus.  The display will showcase the creation of the artwork as it evolves under the hands of the class-collaborators.  In class demos showing various equipment, media creation tools, live processing applications, and execution software’s will familiarize students with the programs and their capabilities.  Students will suggest ideas, introduce content, and build media from scratch that will become the core of the artwork.

Greg Mitchell is a an award winning lighting, set and multimedia designer who works around the world creating visual art for live performance, installations and interactive video art.

gmitchell@ucsb.edu

Winter 2019 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AC: On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources
Professor Clarence Barlow, Music

1st 6 Tuesdays
0300-0450
MUSIC 1145

Enrollment Code:             29157

On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources: six illustrated lectures (100 minutes each plus a short break, 10 hours in all) in which Professor Barlow demonstrates how music can be derived from language, other music and algorithms. He will profusely illustrate his lectures with examples of his own music, occasionally referring to music by contemporary colleagues.

After teaching composition in the Netherlands and Germany for 22 years, Professor Clarence Barlow took up the position of Corwin Chair and Composition Program Head at UCSB's Music Department in 2006. His main interest is computer-aided composition for acoustic and electronic instruments, often derived from musical and extramusical sources.

barlow@music.ucsb.edu

INT 186AM: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
0200-0250
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             62257

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AP: Intro to Mayan Astronomy
Professor Gerardo Aldana, Chicano/ Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
SH 1623

Enrollment Code:             65086

This seminar provides a hands-on workshop approach to understanding Ancient Mayan calendric systems and their application to ritual astronomical interests.  It will also initiate consideration of how astronomy was utilized for political purposes.

Professor Aldana works at the intersection of Anthropological Archaeology, Chicana/o Studies and Indigenous Studies with a focus on Ancient Mayan culture and science.

gvaldana@ucsb.com

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AQ: Loving in the War Years - 35th Anniversary!
Professor Dolores Ines Casillas, Chicano and Chicana Studies

Wednesdays
0200-0250
SH 1713

Enrollment Code:             65961

This seminar reads and discusses portions of Cherrie Moraga's pathbreaking book, Loving in the War Years. The Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies is highlighting this book during the winter 2019 academic quarter. Loving in the War Years consists of creative prose that speaks to Moraga's coming of age as both a Chicana and a lesbian during the politically conservative 1980s. In honor of its 35th anniversary, we re-read and revisit the book within the contemporary political, queered moment. The seminar will also attend a campus lecture and take part in a Q&A discussion session with the author.

Dolores Ines Casillas is Associate Professor in the Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies and a Faculty Affiliate of Film & Media Studies, Applied Linguistics, and the Center for Information Technology and Society (CITS) at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). Her research focuses on immigrant engagement with U.S. Spanish-language media.  She is the author of Sounds of Belonging: U.S. Spanish-language Radio and Public Advocacy (NYU Press, 2014), co-editor with Maria Elena Cepeda (Williams College) of the Companion to Latina/o Media Studies (Routledge Press, 2016) and co-editor with Mary Bucholtz and Jin Sook Lee (UC Santa Barbara) of Feeling It: Language, Race and Affect in Latinx Youth Learning (Routledge Press, 2018).  Her current book project examines how Spanish-dominant communities rely on specific media industries in the United States from DVD rentals via Red Box and smartphone applications such as What’s App, to language learning media, both online and audio-lingual, like Open English and Ingles Sin Barreras. She teaches courses on U.S. Spanish-language and bilingual media, radio and sound practices, language politics and accent studies, and Chicana/o popular culture.

casillas@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AR: Collaborating To Build An Interactive Media Design
Professor Greg Mitchell, Theater and Dance

1st 5 TUE
0300-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             73874

In this course the students and instructor will work in a hands on fashion to create a piece of interactive multimedia art which will be on public display on the campus.  The display will showcase the creation of the artwork as it evolves under the hands of the class-collaborators.  In class demos showing various equipment, media creation tools, live processing applications, and execution software’s will familiarize students with the programs and their capabilities.  Students will suggest ideas, introduce content, and build media from scratch that will become the core of the artwork.

Greg Mitchell is a an award winning lighting, set and multimedia designer who works around the world creating visual art for live performance, installations and interactive video art.

gmitchell@ucsb.edu

Winter 2019 - Transfer Discovery & Linked Seminars

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AC: Seeking Social Justice: Community-Based Participatory Research on Health Disparities
Professor Melissa Morgan-Consoli, Counseling, Clinical and School Psychology
Professor Melissa Smith, Institute for Social, Behavioral and Economic Research

Tuesdays (January 8, 22 and February 5, 19 and March 5)
0430-0620
LIBR 1576

Enrollment Code:             65201

This Seminar provides students an opportunity to learn about a social justice-based research methodology and, partnering with community-serving organizations, to seek solutions to community health and mental health problems. Students will learn about community-based participatory research (CBPR), applying it within the social context of underrepresented populations living in California.

Melissa Morgan Consoli is a Counseling Psychologist and Associate Professor in the Counseling, Clinical and School Psychology program at UCSB. Her research interests include issues of resilience, thriving, social justice and immigration, with an emphasis on Latino/a populations. She utilizes quantitative, mixed, qualitative, and CBPR approaches in her work.

Melissa Smith is Director of Health Equity Initiatives at UCSB, and a physician who has worked in poor communities in the US and Latin America. She has been involved in CBPR with local partners, and developed community health worker training programs and public health manuals for community health and empowerment.

mlmorg@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AD: What's "Latin" in Latin America?
Professor Dorota Dutsch, Classics
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Mondays 
0500-0650
GIRV 2123

Enrollment Code:             65219

When we hear terms like “Latin America” or “Latinx” we usually do not associate them with things like the Roman Empire or Ancient Greece. However, these apparently separate realms have deep historical, cultural and political connections. This seminar explores these relationships.

Dorota Dutsch is Associate Professor in the Department of Classics. Her research focuses on social performance (comprising anything from comedy to funeral rites). Her current book project explores the ways in which the literary figures of women philosophers, especially that of Pythagoras’s wife Theano, engaged with ancient ideas about the gender of knowledge

Juan Pablo Lupi is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. His research and teaching interests include literature and intellectual history in Latin America; Cuban and Venezuelan literature; critical theory; literature and philosophy; and literature and science.

dorota.dutsch@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AE: Cheers! The History and Science of Ale, Beer, and Brewers
Professor Mike Wilton, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Professor Jarett Henderson, History

Thursdays
1000-1150 am
HSSB 4020

Enrollment Code:             70078

For centuries beer and ale have played a pivotal role in people's social, cultural, and political lives across the globe. In this seminar students will be introduced to this history alongside the science of brewing. Students will discover how yeast (a single-celled organism) is harnessed by brewers to produce beer as well as how those who did the brewing changed with technology, time, and geography.

Dr. Wilton is interested in how microorganisms interact with each other and their environment to produce food and drink, or cause infection. After earning his PhD from the University of Toronto, Mike arrived at UCSB to teach in the biology program. His research focuses on the isolation and identification of bacteria that can produce antibiotics.

Dr. Henderson is interested in the social and cultural lives of those who called the nineteenth century British Empire home. He received his Ph.D from York University and is an expert in the history of sex, gender, and vice. In 2018, he joined the UCSB History Department where he teaches courses on the history of colonialism, gender, and sexuality and is conducting research on the social and sexual politics of colonial rule.

mike.wilton@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Fall 2018 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AC: Love and Desire from the Middle Ages to the Present in Iberian and Latin American Literatures and Cultures
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0500-0650
GIRV 1119

Enrollment Code: 59659

This seminar offers an overview of the way our conceptualization of Love and Desire has shaped Western thought from its inception to the present. Love lies at the intersection of sexual passion, religious mysticism, and social utopia. Conceptualized as a human need for creating a relationship with the other we will begin by examining how the Greeks believed "love" encompassed the notions of eros, philia, agape and Charistia/Love/Charity. From the most natural and simple sexual desire (eros), love moved to embrace the need to establish a connection with others through friendship (philia) or with the societal group at large (agape). A human mystical longing to transcend the sphere of the merely human was also recognized through the concept of Charistia/Love/Charity. To explore how Love and Desire have been conceptualized and explored throughout the centuries in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, we will pay attention to literature, painting, and music.

Dr. Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations.

Professor Bermudez' areas of research and teaching are the cultural productions (especially literature and music) of the Iberian Peninsula, and Equatorial Guinea. Her critical work focuses on feminism, women's studies, poetic discourses, and politics. She is the author of Las dinamicas del deseo: subjetividad y lenguaje en la poesia espanola contemporanea (1997) and La esfinge de la escritura: la poesia etica de Blanca Varela (2005). She was the editor of the Special Issue La Espana Constitucional: Democracia y Cultura, 1978-2008 for the Revista de Estudios Hispanicos (2010), and co-edited the volume From Stateless Nations to Postnational Spain/De Naciones sin estado a la Espana Postnacional (2002), the Special Issue on Spanish Popular Music Studies for the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies (2009), and the Mediterranean Matrix: Memory, Migration, Movement for the Journal of Mediterranean Studies (2016).  Her articles have appeared in critical collections and journals in the U.S. and abroad including Modern Language Notes, Revista de Estudios Hispanicos, Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Siglo XX/Twentieth Century, Letras femeninas, and Anuario de Estudios Literarios Galegos. Her current research focuses on Iberian feminisms (with Roberta Johnson). Her third book, Rocking the Boat: Race and Migration in Contemporary Spanish Music, is forthcoming.

cortijo@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 89AI: Star Wars: Psychological and Literary Perspectives
Professor Steve Smith, Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology
Professor Kara Mae Brown, Writing Program

Mondays
1000-1150 am
ED 1215

Enrollment Code:             66142

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away students critically examined the original Star Wars trilogy from a psychological and literary perspective. Students will study Star Wars as an example of Joseph Campbell's heroic journey, with special attention to the psychology of heroes and the film's storytelling techniques.

Steve Smith, Ph.D. is clinical psychologist on the faculties of the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology and the College of Creative Studies.  His interests include the psychology of men and boys, psychological assessment, the mental health needs of athletes, and ethical uses of the Jedi Mind Trick.

Kara Mae Brown, MFA is a Lecturer in the Writing Program and the College of Creative Studies. Her teaching and research interests include writing pedagogy, creative writing, and feminist theories of The Force.

ssmith@education.ucsb.edu

Fall 2018 - First Year Exploration Seminars

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes 2018
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Monday, October 1 through Friday, October 5, 2018
0100-0250pm (NEW TIME!)
PSB-N 4606

Enrollment Code:             66167

In the week of October 1st the 2018 Nobel prizes will be announced. We will find out how one gets nominated and follow the announcements in the different fields on the days they happen. We will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94ER: Is There Life Elsewhere in the Universe?
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  59774

Is Earth the only place in the universe where life appeared? Does or did life exist on Mars? Does intelligent life exist elsewhere? This seminar will explore the question of whether we’re alone in the Universe.  Topics will include the origins of life, the search for life (past and present) in the universe, the search for extraterrestrial intelligent life, the future of life on Earth, and the impact of any such discoveries on science and society.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94FH: Breaking the Mold: How the Movies Can Break Through Stereotypes of People with Disabilities
Professor George Singer, Education

Tuesdays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:  59618

In this seminar students will view scenes from movies that challenge negative societal stereotypes about people with disabilities by replacing them through effective empathetic story telling. We will discuss the status of people with disabilities in the contemporary US and how the disability rights movement is fighting for change. In addition to studying how disability stereotypes are challenged in recent movies, we will look at the ways that the art of filmmaking is used to deliver richer understandings of fellow citizens with disabilities. 

George Singer has been a Professor of Special Education at UCSB since 1995. He educates special education credential students and doctoral students. His research has been focused on children with severe disabilities and their families. Professor Singer is very interested in the way society constructs disability and treats people who have physical, intellectual, or emotional differences from the norm. He has been a special education teacher and has family members with disabilities. The way movies and television can help elevate the status of people with disabilities is a major interest.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art:  Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
1000-1150
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code: 27532

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, PBS, and The TODAY Show and has exhibited throughout the world. He is the author of several books and the recipient of the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award. kipfulbeck.com

seaweed@arts.ucsb.edu

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicana and Chicano Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays (NEW DAY!)
0300-0450
SH 4503

Enrollment Code: 27540

This seminar will focus on the discussion of contemporary political issues both domestic and international.  Prof. Garcia will provide historical context to this discussion but students will lead the discussions on a range of issues facing the United States today including the fall elections.

Mario T. Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He teaches courses on the Chicano/Latino experiences including immigration, civil rights, religion, and oral history.  He is the author of more than twenty books in Chicano history and his books have won many awards.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code: 27557

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0200-0250
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 58164

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot's fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 27581

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Campus Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise Sport Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code: 27607

This seminar is designed to explore elements of health and wellness.  Class meetings will introduce students to a variety of campus resources and activities that promote a healthy lifestyle.  Topics include making healthy food choices, stress management, fitness activities, adventure program activities and personal health assessments. 

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy's education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TG: Critical thinking: the Most Important Thing You Will Likely Learn as a University Student
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Wednesdays
0600-0650
GIRV 1108

We will read and discuss papers on critical thinking covering broad disciplines, including but not limited to science.

Professor Reich’s science research is on epigenetics, enzyme mechanisms, drug design and delivery.  His science education research is on how to improve large lecture format courses to engage students in critical thinking and in teaching K-12 students how science works.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Lecture
Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018
4:00-5:00pm
Room 2224, Music Building

Flute Ensemble Rehearsal
Wednesday, November 28, 2018
7:00-8:00 p.m.
Karl Geiringer Hall, Music Building

Wind Ensemble Concert
Thursday, November 29, 2018
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, Music Building

Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players Concert
Monday, December 3, 2018
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, Music Building

Enrollment Code: 27631

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

***Excursion***
INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist Art, Literature and Culture from Picasso to Ai Weiwei
Professor Enda Duffy, English

1st 3 Fridays
1000-1150
GIRV 2110
~and~
Excursion on Saturday, October 20
1000-0150
Santa Barbara Art Museum

Enrollment Code: 27649

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed.  This course surveys these changes with a focus on London/Paris, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine Blast. This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature, and then asks: what has happened to art since?   We then spend a half-day together interacting with some impressionist, modernist, and contemporary art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum.

Enda Duffy is the Arnhold Presidential Dept. Chair of the English Dept. He teaches courses in twentieth century literature and culture, critical theory, Irish literature, and James Joyce.  His most recent book was ‘The Speed Handbook: Velocity, Pleasure, Modernism,’ he has completed a book on emigration and literature, and is at work on one on energy, stress and adrenaline in modern culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94TK: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
0300-0350
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 27656

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TN: Puzzling Problems in Science and Technology
Professor Behrooz Parhami, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Wednesdays
0400-0450
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code: 58172

Science/technology challenges are puzzle-like, in that their solutions require insight and out-of-the-box thinking. Many of these problems are related to popular math/logic puzzles in terms of the pertinent insights and solution methods. We will discuss several such problems and link them to a number of puzzles, such as guessing the next term in a series (recommender systems), optical illusions (3D modeling of objects), and mazes (GPS and other navigation aids).

Behrooz Parhami (PhD, UCLA) is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and former Associate Dean for Academic Personnel, College of Engineering, at UCSB. A Life Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of IET and British Computer Society, he has written six textbooks and more than 300 peer-reviewed technical papers. Professionally, he serves on journal editorial boards and conference program committees and is also active in technical consulting. His hobby consists of solving many different kinds of puzzles.

parhami@ece.ucsb.edu

INT 94UI: When Paintings Talk: Poetry About Visual Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Mondays
0100-0150
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code: 27680

We will read poems that engage is ekphrasis, descriptions of works of art, and discuss what happens when art finds its voice. Poems by Keats, Auden, Ashbery, Willams, and Hollander, and visual art works by Breughel, Turner, and Parmigianino, among others, will deepen our perspective on how visual art interacts with its viewers, the world, and other art forms. Students will be expected to read two or three poems in relation to several visual images each week while briefly recording their responses in a reading journal.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Politics
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing Program

Tuesdays
0400-0450
SH 1432

Enrollment Code: 59626

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Robert Samuels has doctorates in Psychology and English.  He teaches in the UCSB writing program and is the author of 11 books, including Why Public Higher Education Should be Free and Educating Inequality.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

***JUST ADDED***
***EXCURSION-BASED***
INT 94UP: "We Are Gauchos": Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor Kathleen Patterson, Writing Program

1st 5 Mondays
0900-1050 am
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:             66159

This seminar explores campus and Isla Vista sites, artifacts, and practices illustrating how what we remember and forget about our shared past shapes who we are in the present. Field observation and archival research informed by readings from memory studies and local history will be used to examine who we are as Gauchos.

Kathy Patterson is a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. Her interest in memory studies stems from her doctoral work in Southern Studies and Disability Studies. She teaches a memory themed entry-level writing course and an upper division Humanities writing course focused on collective memory, commemoration, and memorialization.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

INT 94UX: Contemporary Women's Writing
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Thursdays
1230-0120
SH 2635

Enrollment Code: 59543

The seminar focuses on contemporary women's writing and the issues it brings to the fore for the reader and critic. We will discuss questions of women's self-representation and power, migration and postcoloniality, sexuality, work, femininity and transgression (ex: the figure of the witch or of "difficult women"). Authors include Maryse Conde', Jeannette Winterson, Lucia Berlin, Roxanne Gay, and Angela Carter.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English and Feminist Studies at UCSB. She teaches classes on twentieth century literature and culture, cinema and literature, the representation of women, theories of gender and sexualities. She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body, and another book on "stuff" and its meaning and uses in contemporary cultures of abundance. She is now working on a new book on work, the work ethic, and not-doing.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94UY: Playwriting Master Class
Professor Frances Cowhig, Theater and Dance

Thursdays
1100-1250
HSSB 1105

Enrollment Code:             60897

Start a new play from scratch! In this five-session master class, students will engage in visual and textual generative activities designed to help them imagine the worlds, characters and conflicts that will inhabit their play, and also draft and workshop in class in-progress scenes from their play. Participants will be exposed to and practice via scene work the nuts and bolts of dramatic writing, and learn skills that will be applicable for writing for both stage and screen. No experience necessary.

Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig is an internationally produced playwright whose work has been staged at the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre of Great Britain, Manhattan Theater Club, the Goodman Theatre, Trafalgar Studios 2 on the West End and the Jazsef Katona Theater in Budapest. In 2018 her most recent work, Snow in Midsummer, a contemporary adaptation of the Yuan play by Guan Hanqing, will receive its North American premiere at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, in a production directed by Justin Audibert. 

fcowhig@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94UZ: The Modern Girl Around the World
Professor Sabine Fruhstuck, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies

Thursdays
1000-1050
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code: 59600

The Modern Girl emerged quite literally around the world in the first half of the twentieth century. Often adorned in provocative fashions and known by a variety of names, Modern Girls appeared to disregard roles of dutiful daughter, wife, and mother. Contemporary journalists, politicians, social scientists, and the general public debated whether Modern Girls were looking for sexual, economic, or political emancipation, and wondered whether the Modern Girl might be little more than an image, a hollow product of clever advertising campaigns and the new commodity culture. We will explore all of these possibilities as well as some Modern Girls™ take on them.

Sabine Fruhstuck is interested in the study of modern and contemporary Japanese culture and its relationship to the rest of the world. Among other publications, she is the author of Playing War: Children and the Paradoxes of Modern Militarism in Japan (2017), Uneasy Warriors: Gender, Memory and Popular Culture in the Japanese Army (2007), and Colonizing Sex: Sexology and Social Control in Modern Japan (2003).

fruhstuck@eastasian.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VA: Create a RARE website: Responsive, Accessible, Rhetorically Effective Web Design Made (Sort of) Easy
Professor Madeleine Sorapure, Writing Program

Thursdays
1200-1250 pm
SSMS 1005

Enrollment Code:             71399

The class is intended for beginners who don't know HTML or CSS but would like to learn; no experience with web design is necessary.  In this course, you'll create a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. The website can grow and evolve along with you over the next four years, as you add writing, images, video, and other elements that convey your knowledge, skills, and interests. You'll learn some basic HTML and CSS in order to modify templates and learn strategies for making your site responsive on different devices, accessible to a range of users, and rhetorically effective in conveying your content.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 94VB: What Can Latin America Teach Us About the US?
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0600-0650 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code:             71407

“Populism”, “erosion of democracy”, “foreign meddling”: These are some of terms often used to describe the current situation of the country. In this seminar we will explore how Latin America—its history, peoples and cultures—may offer a few valuable lessons on how to understand US society and politics today.

Professor Juan Pablo Lupi is a native of Venezuela. He teaches courses on Latin American literature, intellectual history, and literary theory. His research interests include Cuban and Venezuelan history and culture, contemporary Latin American poetry, and the relationships between literature, philosophy, science and technology.

juan.lupi@ucsb.edu

Fall 2018 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AF: Psychological Science in the World of Game of Thrones
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
0500-0550 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             71662

This seminar introduces various issues in Psychological Science through the lens of the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, family resemblance, gender roles, religious belief and skepticism, the mind-body problem, concepts of the supernatural, how to avoid incest, and which character might have what psychological disorder.

Tamsin German is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her research concerns the cognitive foundations of the human capacity for understanding other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thinking, such as how we represent and reason about supernatural entities like Gods and ghosts.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

***FIELD WORK***
INT 186AJ: School Psychology Jedi Academy: Supporting Social, Emotional, and Mental Health of Children
Professor Shane Jimerson, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Mondays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:  66183

School psychologists have expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This seminar introduces how school psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and others to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments. Fieldwork also included. May the force be with you!

Professor Shane Jimerson is a nationally certified school psychologist, and recent President of both National and International School Psychology organizations. Dr. Jimerson has received numerous awards for his scholarship focused on understanding and promoting the social, emotional, behavioral, academic, and mental health of children.  You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_R._Jimerson

Jimerson@ucsb.edu

INT 186AK: Studying Abroad for Transfer Students
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Thursdays
0400-0450
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  66175

This course is designed to prepare transfer students for studying abroad.  We will cover a variety of topics related to this topic:  program options, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, financial aid and housing, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus draft a scholarship essay.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His research interests include modern pilgrimages, Islam and Modernity, modern Islamic movements, and religion and the culinary cultures of the Middle East.  Among his most recent publications is the Encyclopedia of Islam (Facts on File, 2009), which is now going into a second expanded edition.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

campo@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AL: Religious and Other Unusual Experiences
Professor Ann Taves, Religious Studies

Thursdays
1000-1050 am
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             71670

We know that people all over the world have unusual experiences, but we don't know how beliefs and practices influence the frequency and interpretation of such experiences.  We are in the process of figuring out if some experiences are consistently interpreted as religious or if that varies by culture and tradition. We have designed the Inventory of Non-Ordinary Experiences (INOE) to help us answer these questions.  In this seminar, you will have a chance to take the Inventory yourself and understand why we see both similarities and differences between people in the US and India.

Professor Ann Taves is an internationally recognized expert on religious experience with a particular focus on how unusual experiences are interpreted in very different ways within and across cultures.  She teaches courses on religious experience, new religious movements, and comparing worldviews as well as supervising the interdisciplinary Religion, Experience, and Mind Lab Group.

anntaves@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AM: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
1200-1250 pm
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code:             71688

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 186AN: Cartographies of Spain's Capital: Madrid in Literature and Film
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
0100-0150 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             71696

The purpose of this Honors Seminar is to familiarize students with some of the literary, cinematic, and musical representations of the city capital of Spain from the late 19th Century from the decades preceding the end of the Franco dictatorship (1939-1975) to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the late 20th Century with Madrid identified both as postmodern space during the years of La Movida (1975-1985) and as a capital of the Global South.

Professor Bermudez's areas of research and teaching are the cultural productions (especially literature and music) of the Iberian Peninsula, Equatorial Guinea, and Latin America, particularly Peru. Her latest publication is the co-edition of the volume, ‘Cartographies of Madrid: Contesting Urban Space at the Crossroads of the Global South and the Global North’ (2018).

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

***CANCELLED***
INT 186AO: Los Angeles' Initial Water Supply
Professor Jordan Clark, Earth Science

Tuesdays
0900-0950 am
GIRV 1106

Enrollment Code:            

This seminar will examine Los Angeles' efforts to secure a stable water supply from the Owen's Valley.  The primary text is Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner.  There will also be a 1-day long field trip, on Friday, November 30th, to the Jawbone Canyon Siphon and the St. Francis Dam failure site.

Prof. Clark is an environmental scientist who works in geochemistry and hydrology.  Much of his current research relates to water supply problems in California.  In particular, he investigates groundwater flow near Managed Aquifer Recharge sites.  He has taught a version of this class numerous times.

jfclark@geol.ucsb.edu

Spring 2018 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AE: Trust
Professor Norah Dunbar, Communication
Professor Kevin Moore, Writing Program
Professor James Frew, Environmental Science and Management

Monday and Wednesdays
0200-0315
GIRV 1119

Enrollment Code: 56515

How do you know if people or data are trustworthy? Trust represents an expectation of honesty and credibility; it allows us to work collaboratively with others. From the perspectives of Communication and Environmental Informatics, this course will examine trust in both people and information that defines social and professional life. Our primary goal will be to examine the nature of trust from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Dr. Dunbar is a Professor of Communication at UCSB. She teaches courses in nonverbal and interpersonal communication, communication theory, and deception detection.  She was the Principal Investigator of a $5.4 Million contract from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity in 2011-2013 and has had her research funded by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and the Center for Identification Technology Research. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has presented over 90 papers at National and International conferences. Her research has appeared in top journals in her discipline including Communication Research, Communication Monographs, and Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication as well as interdisciplinary journals such as Journal of Management Information Systems and Computers in Human Behavior.

Kevin Moore teaches a range of courses, including Writing 105R (Rhetoric), Writing 109F (Film), Writing 109HP (Health Professions), 109 HU (Humanities), and 109V (Visual Arts). He also teaches in the Engineering writing sequence. He earned a PhD in English from UCLA, where he began his current research project on the rhetoric of creativity. Before coming to UCSB, he taught writing, literature, and critical thinking at the University of Arizona, the UCLA English Department, the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, and Loyola Marymount University. His broader research interests include writing studies, nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature, American intellectual history, and Ralph Ellison. He also writes fiction and creative nonfiction.

James Frew is an Associate Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. He teaches graduate courses in computer programming, scientific data management, and geographic information systems. He has a PhD in geography and has published research on remote sensing, image processing, massive distributed data systems, digital libraries, computational provenance, science data archives, and array databases. He currently advises the UCSB Library on research data curation, and has research funding for data citation (NSF) and satellite image databases (Intel Corp.)

ndunbar@ucsb.edu

INT 89AF:  Citizenship and Democracy
Professor Helen Morales, Classics
Professor Paige Digeser, Political Science

Tuesdays
1000-1150
GIRV 2123

Enrollment Code:  56523

"Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag," tweeted Donald Trump as President-Elect; "if they do, there must be consequences - perhaps loss of citizenship." This seminar will analyze changing ideas of citizenship and democracy today in the US, and the legacies of ancient Greece and Rome.

Helen Morales is a noted classicist and cultural critic. Together with Professor Beth DePalma Digeser, Professor Morales is co-ordinating the 2018 UCSB project Changing Faces of Citizenship.

Professor Paige Digeser is a renowned political philosopher whose research fields include power, identity, forgiveness, the place of ethics in international relations, and the relationship between theory and practice.

hmorales@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 89AG: Horror and Fantasy in Short Stories and Films
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Suzanne Jill Levine, Spanish and Portugese

Mondays
1200-0150
PHELPS 1425

Enrollment Code:  59311

This course will explore the avatars of the horror story in 19th and narrative and its legacy in 20th century short prose and films. As an extreme form of anti realistic representation, horror stories are able to subvert the arbitrary, frail nature of modern culture and rational, fact-based roots to expose instead the hidden, elemental impulses that rule human emotions. This seminar will situate horror stories and films with their cultural and artistic contexts facilitating thus student participation and in-class discussion. 
Topics: Ghosts, monsters (Vampires, Lycanthropes, Zombies), Mad Scientists, Criminal Minds. 
Stories by Hoffmann, Poe, Wilcock, Jacobs, Lovecraft, Wells, Stevenson, Maupassant, Villiers de L'Isle Adam, Quiroga, Lugones, Anderson Imbert, Fuentes.
Films (Excerpts) by Whale, Browning, Tourneur, Hitchcock, Fisher, Corman, Hopper and Romero.

Jorge Luis Castillo is an award winning author and scholar. He has written a neobarroque novella, La estación florida (Isla Negra, 1997), and two PEN Club Award-winning collections of short stories, La vida vulgar (Isla Negra, 2004) and La virgen de los boleros (Isla Negra 2015). He has published two scholarly books on the poetry of Spanish American Modernismo and Posmodernismo, El lenguaje y la poesía  de Julio Herrera y Reissig (Cuadernos de Marcha, 1999) and Gris en azul: el tedio y la creación poetica en Ruben Dario y la lirica hispanoamericana posmodernista (Academia Nicaragüense de la Lengua, 2010). He has also written a variety of scholarly articles on Spanish American modern and contemporary poetry and short story.

Suzanne Jill Levine is a leading translator of Latin American literature, and professor at the University of California in Santa Barbara where she directs a Translation Studies doctoral program.  Her scholarly and critical works include her award-winning literary biography Manuel Puig and the Spider Woman (FSG & Faber& Faber, 2000) and her groundbreaking book on the poetics of translation The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction (published in 1991 and reissued this year by Dalkey Archive Press, along with her classic translations of novels by Manuel Puig).  Her many honors include National Endowment for the Arts and NEH fellowship and research grants, the first PEN USA West Prize for Literary Translation (1989), the PEN American Center Career Achievement award (1996), and a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship.   She has just completed a five volume project as general editor of the works of Borges for Penguin Classics.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 89AH: Learn Like a Physicist
Professor Deborah Fygenson, Physics
Professor Tengiz Bibilashvili, Physics

Fridays
0300-0450
GIRV 1115 (new location)

Enrollment Code:  59329

Physicists love learning about how nature works and why.  Professional physicists never stop learning.  What strategies do professional physicists use to learn? How can these same strategies benefit a physics student?  In the context of freshman mechanics, students will practice learning strategies including: dimensional analysis, back-of-the-envelope calculations, and simple diagrams.

Deborah Fygenson earned her B.Sc in physics from MIT and her Ph.D. in physics from Princeton.  She loves learning like an experimental physicist and teaching other to do the same. Professor Fygenson's research aims to learn the physical design principles underlying biomolecular machinery, and to use that knowledge to invent nanoscale instruments.

Dr. B aka Tengiz Bibilashvili earned his Ph.D. at Tbilisi State University. His Ph.D. thesis was about Non-equilibrium Quantum Filed Diagrams. Later he focused on teaching physics and he prepared several Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal winners at the International Physics Olympiads based on physics problem solving.

fygenson@ucsb.edu

Spring 2018 - First Year Exploration Seminars

INT 94FH: Disability in the Movies: Creating and Breaking Stereotypes
Professor George Singer, Education

Thursdays
1200-1250
ED 1213

Enrollment Code:  27631

In this seminar students will gain a historical overview of the way that negative attitudes about people with disabilities have been perpetuated in film and how cinema has also been a powerful vehicle for breaking down these prejudicial and limiting stereotypes. In the first five class meetings students will watch key excerpts from films that transmitted societal fears and prejudices about people with physical and cognitive differences. In the second half of the quarter students will become familiar with films that have broken down these stereotypical constructions of disability and offered more liberating alternatives. The impact of war and attitudes toward disabled veterans as well as the historical impact of modern medicine and eugenics will be illustrated with award winning films. Students will watch and review a movie as their major assignment in the seminar. Small group discussions are emphasized as well as brief lectures and guided presentations of film vignettes. The instructor emphasizes the way the tools of film making are used to powerfully convey attitudes about people with disabilities. The power of cinema to bring an audience close to and understanding of people who are otherwise socially distant is emphasized, the power to create empathy and understanding or its opposite.

Professor Singer teaches doctoral students and students preparing to be special educators in the Graduate School of Education. His research interests center on families of children with disabilities, on education of children with severe disabilities, and on topics in disability studies including social policy, law, and the impact of the mass media on attitudes toward people with disabilities. Prior to becoming a professor Dr. Singer was a Buddhist monk, a vocational trainer, special education teacher, and a director of a group home. Teaching an Exploration Seminar on the way people with disabilities have been portrayed in the movies and TV is one of the favorite parts of my job at UCSB.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
1000-1150
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code:  27649

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, PBS, and The TODAY Show and has exhibited throughout the world. He is the author of several books and the recipient of the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award. kipfulbeck.com

seaweed@arts.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0500-0550
TD-W 2517

Enrollment Code:  27656

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative, even artistic? And you, do you collect? How does collecting fit into a life story?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). He has also published articles about collecting and collage and has given talks about collecting around the country. For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Tuedays
0200-0420
HSSB 1232

Enrollment Code:  27672

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Professor Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0200-0250
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  56374

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrot's fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94KC: The Murderous Mother: Medea on Stage and Screen
Professor Francis Dunn, Classics

Tuesdays
0400-0450
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  27680

Discussion each week of a play or movie based on the story of Medea, a woman who killed her own children to punish her husband Jason. Over the centuries and in different cultures, the story has found new and powerful meanings.

Francis Dunn is Professor in the Classics Department, where he teaches Greek Mythology and conducts research on ancient literature and culture, especially Greek tragedy.

fdunn@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays
0200-0350
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  27730

This seminar presents several historical film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino experience in the United States.  The seminar analyzes these films in historical perspective.  Film cover topics such as immigration, education, civil rights, and the rise of Latino political power.  This seminar meets for an hour and 45 minutes in order to show the film and have immediate reaction and discussion.

Professor Mario T. Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  His research specialty is Chicano history or the history of Mexicans in the United States.  He has published many books on Chicano/Latino history.  His focus is on immigration, civil rights, ethnic leadership, and Latino Catholicism.  He teaches courses on Chicano history and Chicano Studies.

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Werner Kuhn, Geography

Wednesdays
0300-0350
PHELPS 3512
 
Enrollment Code:  59352
 
The seminar will introduce you to the many varieties of spatial thinking occurring in selected arts and sciences. You will explore spatial reasoning for problem solving (sciences), creative expression (arts), and interpretation (humanities). You will learn from concrete projects how statistics, graphs, maps, and virtual reality aid learning, analysis, visualization, discovery, and solutions to socio‐environmental problems. Arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, and engineering faculty will
 illustrate tools to support spatial thinking and to integrate knowledge across disciplines by location.
 
Dr. Werner Kuhn is a professor in the Geography Department, teaching undergraduate and graduate classes on Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and the director of the Center for Spatial Studies, both at UCSB. He holds a doctorate in spatial information engineering and has held post-doctoral and faculty positions at universities in the US, Germany, and Austria. His main research interest is to improve the usability of GIS through better theories of the contents of such systems and the questions that can be posed to them.
 

INT 94QD: Studying Abroad
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
0100-0150
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  56382

This course is designed to prepare students for studying abroad as undergraduates at UCSB.  We will cover a variety of topics related to this topic:  program options, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, overcoming challenges, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus draft an application and scholarship essay.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His research interests include modern pilgrimages, Islam and Modernity, modern Islamic movements, and religion and the culinary cultures of the Middle East.  Among his most recent publications is the Encyclopedia of Islam (Facts on File, 2009), which is now going into a second expanded edition.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

campo@ucsb.edu

INT 94RU: Nuclear Futures in the Developing World
Professor Ann-Elise Lewallen, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:  59592

This seminar explores why developing nations choose the nuclear option even when renewable energy prices are falling and despite the risks of Fukushima type disasters. Through examining case studies of nuclear economies India, Japan, Vietnam, and Taiwan, we will examine the future of nuclear in emergent economies.

Professor Lewallen's research focuses on critical indigenous studies, energy policy, and environmental justice in contemporary Japan and India. Lewallen has conducted ethnographic research with Indigenous communities in Japan (Ainu) and in India (Adivasi peoples), on development, energy exports, and civil society engagement.

alewal@ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Freshman Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise Sport Studies

Fridays
1000-1050
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:  27813

This seminar provides an overview of information related to basic health and wellness topics.  Reveal and explore wellbeing within the context of college life and beyond.  Topics include, fitness, nutrition, sleep, stress management, mental health.  Students will be introduced to resources on campus with focus on recognizing strategies to navigate a healthy lifestyle.

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy's education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TG: Critical Thinking: the Most Important You Learn as a University Student
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Mondays
0600-0650
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  56390

Critical thinking forms the core of diverse human activities, including but not limited to science. Arguing from evidence is a skill that can be developed and this course seeks to improve your understanding and practice of this essential practice. We will read papers on diverse topics ranging from science and medicine, to law. Students engage in in class discussions and submit short, weekly summaries of the material.

Professor of Biochemistry with a focus on epigenetics, drug discovery, enzymes, drug delivery. Professor Reich also has an interest in improving the public's understanding of how science works through the SciTrek outreach program which he started to help K-12 students and teachers.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music Live!
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Class Meeting
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00-5:00 p.m.
Room 2224, Music Building

Wind Ensemble 25th Anniversary Alumni Concert
Sunday, May 27, 2018 | 3 p.m. | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students | $5 non-UCSB students | $10 general admission

Ensemble for Contemporary Music
Wednesday, May 30, 2018 | 4 p.m. | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students | $5 non-UCSB students | $10 general admission

Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players
Monday, June 4, 2018 | 7:30 p.m. | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students | $5 non-UCSB students | $10 general admission

Jazz Ensemble
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | 7:30 p.m. | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students | $5 non-UCSB students | $10 general admission

Enrollment Code:  27862

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at all Department of Music concerts in the term and class(es) are required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94UA: 20 Questions, Lawyer's Edition
Professor Gina Genova, Writing Program

1st 7 Thursdays
0400-0550
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  27888

Ever wondered what it was like to be a lawyer? What do personal injury lawyers do that is different from criminal defense practitioners? Now is your chance to find out as we pose student-generated and class curated questions to five different types of lawyers, each exploring a different legal practice area. The quarter will begin with an overview of the profession and a discussion of the LSAT and Law School with UCSB pre-law advisors. Lawyers will come in each week and speak for about an hour, answering our questions and generating interactive discussions along the way. Students will pose questions for each speaker based on short bios posted to GauchoSpace. Each student will post a response to the night's discussion on our GauchoSpace forum for further discussion.

Gina L. Genova, Esq. is a Continuing Lecturer with the Writing Program, teaching Writing for Public Speaking (105PS),  Business Writing (107B), Legal Writing (107L), and Advanced Legal Writing (110L). Additionally, she hosts two freshman seminar speaker series, one on law enforcement and one on the legal profession. Ms. Genova has been a member of the California State and Federal Bars since 1992 and retired in 2015 from her local litigation practice specializing in contract, small business and personal injury law.

genova@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94UI: When Paintings Talk: Poetry About Visual Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0100-0150
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code:  56408

We will read poems that engage is ekphrasis, descriptions of works of art, and discuss what happens when art finds its voice. Poems by Keats, Auden, Ashbery, Willams, and Hollander, and visual art works by Breughel, Turner, and Parmigianino, among others, will deepen our perspective on how visual art interacts with its viewers, the world, and other art forms. Students will be expected to read two or three poems in relation to several visual images each week while briefly recording their responses in a reading journal.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Justice
Profesor Robert Samuels, Writing Program

*note new day/time/location
Tuesdays
1100-1150
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  56424

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Professor Samuels has been teaching for 20 years, and is the author of 11 published books.  He has PhDs in English and Psychoanalysis and is currently writing a book on Global Justice.

rsamuels@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94UP: "We Are Gauchos": Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor Kathy Patterson, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0300-0350
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:  56432

This seminar explores local sites, artifacts, and practices that illustrate how what we remember  ”and forget” about our shared past shapes who we are in the present. Memory studies and local history will inform field observation and archival research aimed at understanding who we are as "Gauchos."

Kathy Patterson is a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. Her interest in memory studies stems from her doctoral work in Southern Studies and Disability Studies. She teaches a memory themed entry-level writing course and an upper division Humanities writing course focused on collective memory, commemoration, and memorialization.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

***Excursion/Lab-Based***
INT 94UR: Environmental Arts + Sciences: Performing Sustainability
Professor Ruth Hellier-Tinoco, Music

Tuesdays ***NOTE NEW DAY***
0500-0550
HSSB 1143
~and~
April 14 Excursion Date

Enrollment Code:  56531

Connecting local experiences with global issues, this course introduces processes for engaging artistic and creative methods to explore scientific and humanistic questions concerning environmental sustainability. Through discussions, lab-studio sessions, and a field trip, students utilize performing arts practices to investigate critical issues. Course includes National Water Dance performance (April 14).

As a creative artist and scholar, Professor Hellier-Tinoco combines interests in performing arts, politics, Mexican studies, identity and environmental issues. Dr. Hellier-Tinoco teaches in the departments of music and theater/dance, with affiliations in feminist studies and Latin American and Iberian Studies, with expertise in experimental performance-making and contemporary politics.

rhellier-tinoco@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94US: The Trojan War: an Historical Event or Fiction?
Professor Ralph Galluci, Classics

Tuesdays
0100-0150
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:  57893

Perhaps the most famous story in Greek mythology is the tale of the Trojan War. Until the 1960's most classical scholars believed that the Trojan War was an historical event.  Today the majority of scholars deny any reality behind the legend. We will examine why this change has occurred.

Ralph Gallucci received his Ph.D. in Greek and Roman History at UCLA in 1986 and teaches in the Classics Department and Honors Program. Ralph has mentored numerous undergraduate research projects. His publications are in the areas of Athenian democracy and Homeric studies, especially the interconnections of memory, legend, and history.

gallucci@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94UT:  Oral Interpreting: Hands on!
Professor Aline Alves Ferreira, Spanish and Portuguese

1ST 5 Fridays
0900-1050
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  57901

It comprises topics that are necessary to develop skills necessary for interpreting and to carry out interpretation into and from Spanish and/or Portuguese.

Aline Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Linguistics (Department of Spanish and Portuguese). Her main topics of interests are: Written Translation, Oral Interpreting, Bilingualism, Heritage Languages, and Second Language Acquisition. Her main topics of interests are: Written Translation, Oral Interpreting, Bilingualism, Heritage Languages, and Second Language Acquisition.

aferreira@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94UV: Cosmopolitanism and Emigration in the 20th Century
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Wednesdays
0200-0250
SH 2617

Enrollment Code:  58685

Cosmopolitanism centers on the clash between a provincial life at home and an international life abroad. In the novels we read the displaces, and often dissident protagonist leaves the homeland in search of cultural, political, or racial freedom. In the second part of the 20th century the cosmopolitan traveler becomes the migrant and the refugee, leaving behind her country in order to survive. We will study both scenarios in the following novels: E.M.Foster's 'A Passage to India', Nella Larsen's 'Passing', Junot Diaz' 'The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao', and Mohsin Hamid's 'Exit West'.

Maurizia Boscagli is a professor of English, affiliated with Comparative Literature and Feminist Studies. She teaches classes in 20th Century British and Anglophone Literature, Modern European Literature, Women's Writing, Modernity and the City, Work and Literature, and Critical Theory. Her research focuses on the cultural production of gender, materiality and our relation to things in cultures of consumption, literature and politics.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

Spring 2018 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AE: Biotechnology and Society
Professor Douglas Thrower, MCDB

Fridays
1200-1250
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  56507

We will learn about and discuss effects on society of new technologies developed as part of the molecular biology revolution  including new approaches to treating cancer, genetically modified foods, genetic profiling, cloning, gene therapy, the application of "DNA fingerprinting" in solving crimes, and one of the most recent and controversial entry into the toolbox of molecular biology, gene editing. 

Professor Thower is a Senior Lecturer in the MCDB Department.  He primarily teached 3rd and 4th year classes in genetics, pharmacology, and physiology.  Students who take his courses are typically planning careers in medicine, pharmacy, or biomedical research. Professor Thrower also carries out research on anti-cancer drugs through the efforts of a small but dedicated group of undergraduate students.

thrower@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 186AF: Psychological Science, Westeros Style
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
0400-0450
HSSB 1223

Enrollment Code:  58701

This seminar illustrates research in Psychological Science as illuminated by the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, free will, religious belief, the mind-body problem, concepts of the supernatural, how to avoid incest, whether Arya is a psychopath and what's up with Hodor. Warning: spoilers are coming!

Tamsin German is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her research is concerned with the cognitive foundation of the human capacity for understanding the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thinking, such as morality and belief in the supernatural.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 186AH: Loki, Thor & Hela: Retracing Superheroes to Their Origins
Professor Viola Miglio, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays
0200-0350
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:  58677

Vikings used to be cool enough on their own, but the latest Marvel sequels seem to imply that not even their gods are interesting enough without spacecraft and explosions. This course aims to look at how Norse historical and mythical figures have evolved and survived from the Dark Ages to today's film industry. Students will consider themes such as death, honour, love, lust, and revenge in one of the Scandinavian cultures that spawned these heroic figures. The texts and films analysed come from one of Europe's coolest peripheries: Iceland.

Viola Miglio is a linguist with a background in Germanic and Norse studies. She has published articles on linguistics, translation, Icelandic and Basque studies. Her most recent books are "The Protection of Cultural Diversity" and "Basque Whalers in the North Atlantic" (co-edited with X. Irujo in 2014 and 2015 respectively). Since 2014, she is also affiliated faculty at the University of Iceland.

miglio@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 186AI: Global Warming, Hoax or Disaster?
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Fridays
1200-0150
NH 1111

Enrollment Code:  59345

The number of Americans who worry about global warming has gone down in the last ten years from 75% to about 50%. Is there less to worry about? What really is the science of climate change? Are the skeptics right? We will explore both the science and the politics of what may (or may not be) either the greatest hoax or the greatest crisis facing planet earth.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

Spring 2018 - Transfer Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 187AB: Choreographic Group Forms/Devising Physical Theater: "Spring Awakening"
Professor Brandon Whited, Department of Theater and Dance
Professor Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig, Department of Theater & Dance

Wednesdays    (April 11th, 18th, 25th; May 2nd, and 9th) 
0200-0550  
TDW 1501

Enrollment Code:  62349

A creative laboratory/seminar utilizing skills, methods and theories from Devised Theater and Group Forms (Dance).  Students will explore creative process through collaboration and group investigation.  Serving as a practical workshop "potentially feeding a future production”we will focus specifically on developing devised material in relation to the musical "Spring Awakening."   Participants should come dressed to move, and be prepared to remove their shoes or change into studio shoes before stepping into the dance studio.

Brandon Whited (MFA), is an Assistant Professor of Dance, teaching contemporary technique, choreography, improvisation, partnering, and performance studies.  Professor Whited's research lies at the intersection of choreographic research and men's/masculinities studies.  Recent projects include performances in Rochester, New York, Baltimore, MD; and Italy--and an ongoing new work "Boys Like Us."

Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig (MFA), is Assistant Professor and Head of Playwriting (Dept. of Theater and Dance).  Her professional credits include current commissions at the National Theatre of Great Britain, Manhattan Theater Club, The Goodman Theatre, and productions at Trafalgar Studios 2 [West End], Crowded Fire, and Page 73 Productions.

brandon_whited@ucsb.edu

Winter 2018 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AC: Love and Desire from the Middle Ages to the Present in Iberian and  Latin American Literatures and Cultures
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish & Portuguese
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish & Portuguese

Tuesdays
0200-0350
GIRV 2119

Enrollment Code:   54593

This seminar offers an overview of the way our conceptualization of Love and Desire has shaped Western thought from its inception to the present. Love lies at the intersection of sexual passion, religious mysticism, and social utopia. Conceptualized as a human need for creating a relationship with the other we will begin by examining how the Greeks believed "love" encompassed the notions of eros, fili­a, agape and Charistia/Love/Charity. From the most natural and simple sexual desire (eros), love moved to embrace the need to establish a connection with others through friendship (fili­a) or with the societal group atlarge (agape). A human mystical longing to transcend the sphere of the merely human was also recognized through the concept of Charistia/Love/Charity.To explore how Love and Desire have been conceptualized and explored throughout the centuries  in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, we will pay attention to literature, painting, and music.

Professor Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th  centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. mHe is the autor of over monographs and editions.His work has been recognized with awards from the National Endowment for  the Humanities (NEH), the American Philosophical Society, the Del Amo Foundation, the Calouste-Gulbenkian Foundation, etc. He is a corresponding member of the Royal Academy of Good Letters (Barcelona).

Professor Silvia Bermudez teaches and researches on Iberian and Latin American Studies. Her current courses and research projects focus on Iberian/Galician Studies, Mediterranean Studies, and Cultural Studies, particularly popular music. She has published extensively in all of  these areas/topics.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 89AD: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Stephen Poole, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Professor Craig Carlson, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Fridays
0200-0350
387-103

Enrollment Code:  54601

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology.  Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Professor Poole is Chair of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. He earned his B.A. at Trinity College, and his Ph.D. at UCSD. His research areas are the molecular genetics of animal development, focusing on genes involved in development of external sense organs in Drosophila, and also contact-dependent growth inhibition in bacteria.

Dr. Carlson earned his BA degree at Colby College and his PhD in marine science at the University of Maryland where he investigated the role that marine microbes play in governing the carbon cycle of open ocean ecosystems. As a Postdoctoral scholar at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) he focused on the biogeochemistry of dissolved organic matter in ocean systems. He joined BIOS faculty in 1996 and remained there until joining EEMB in 2001. Dr. Carlson is a former Chair of EEMB and is a member of UCSB's Marine Science Institute. He is lead PI or Co-PI on several federally sponsored projects in Microbial Oceanography.

poole@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Winter 2018 - First Year Exploration Seminars

INT 94FH: Disability in the Movies: Creating and Breaking Stereotypes
Professor George Singer, Education

Thursdays
1200-1250
GIRV 1115

Enrollment Code:   27680

In this seminar students will gain a historical overview of the way that negative attitudes about people with disabilities have been perpetuated in film and how cinema has also been a powerful vehicle for breaking down these prejudicial and limiting stereotypes. In the first five class meetings students will watch key excerpts from films that transmitted societal fears and prejudices about people with physical and cognitive differences. In the second half of the quarter students will become familiar with films that have broken down these stereotypical constructions of disability and offered more liberating alternatives. The impact of war and attitudes toward disabled veterans as well as the historical impact of modern medicine and eugenics will be illustrated with award winning films. Students will watch and review a movie as their major assignment in the seminar. Small group discussions are emphasized as well as brief lectures and guided presentations of film vignettes. The instructor emphasizes the way the tools of film making are used to powerfully convey attitudes about people with disabilities. The power of cinema to bring an audience close to and understanding of people who are otherwise socially distant is emphasized, the power to create empathy and understanding or its opposite.

I teach doctoral students and students preparing to be special educators in the Graduate School of Education. My research interests center on families of children with disabilities, on education of children with severe disabilities, and on topics in disability studies including social policy, law, and the impact of the mass media on attitudes toward people with disabilities. Prior to becoming a professor I was a Buddhist monk, a vocational trainer, special education teacher, and a director of a group home. Teaching an Exploration Seminar on the way people with disabilities have been portrayed in the movies and TV is one of the favorite parts of my job at UCSB.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays
0500-0550
TD-W 2517

Enrollment Code:   54627

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative, even artistic? And you, do you collect? How does collecting fit into a life story?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). He has also published articles about collecting and collage and has given talks about collecting around the country. For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Mondays
0100-0320
HSSB 1211

Enrollment Code:  54643

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV:  The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0100-0150
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code:  27714

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrotâ’s fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano/a Studies

1st 5 Tuesdays
0200-0350
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:  27748

This seminar will focus on film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino experiences in the United States.  These films will cover various historical and contemporary issues which will also be discussed in historical context.

Professor Mario T. Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He is the author of numerous books on Chicano history.  He has written on immigration, civil rights, political leadership, labor movements, and religion.  He teaches courses on Chicano history and Chicano Studies.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94OU: LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays
0400-0450
HSSB 1105 (new location)

Enrollment Code:             67561

LAUNCH PAD is the new play development program at UCSB's Department of Theater and Dance (http://www.theaterdance.ucsb.edu/launchpad/). With the playwright in residence, we produce a "preview production" of a new play each year. Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development. Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers in class and observe rehearsals and performance to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage.

Risa Brainin is a freelance theater director and Chair of the Department of Theater and Dance. Directorial credits include plays at Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Denver Center Theatre Company, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatre Festival, Syracuse Stage and more. Professor Brainin is the Artistic Director of UCSB's LAUNCH PAD. www.risabrainin.com

risa.brainin@gmail.com

INT 94QX: What White People Need to Know
Professor Paul Spickard, History

Thursdays
0400-0450
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:   27813

We live in a racialized society.  Every social encounter is tinged by race.  Some (mainly White) people experience privilege and others (mostly not White) are penalized on account of race.  Many people don't feel comfortable talking about these issues.  In this seminar we will talk about our experiences of race and seek ways to make things better.

Paul Spickard teaches history, Black studies, Asian American studies, and related subjects.  He has published 19 books and won 21 teaching awards, and he is a little bit crazy.

spickard@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Freshman Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamiesion, Exercise Sport Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:  27847

This seminar provides an overview of information related to basic health and wellness topics.  Reveal and explore wellbeing within the context of college life and beyond.  Topics include, fitness, nutrition, sleep, stress management, mental health.  Students will be introduced to resources on campus with focus on recognizing strategies to navigate a healthy lifestyle.

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy’s education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TF: Dedicated to Serve: Local Law Enforcement Uncensored
Professor Gina Genova, Writing Program

1st 6 Wednesdays
0400-0550
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  54619

With media, politicians, athletes and quasi-celebrities provoking anti-law enforcement sentiment, it's easy to second-guess policies and practices from the comfort of your own home. Intelligent citizens know that they should inform themselves with accurate facts from the source before reaching a conclusion on such issues. This seminar will facilitate that process through a series of talks from five local law enforcement agencies. Members from each branch of law enforcement will explain their function and fit within Santa Barbara County and what life is like for them as members of this community on and off duty. Direct interaction between students and speakers will follow as students ask class-created questions with time for general discussion in a mutually respectful, safe, and candid atmosphere. Safety tips and career insights are also highlighted.

Gina L. Genova, Esq. is a Continuing Lecturer with the Writing Program, teaching Writing for Public Speaking (105PS),  Business Writing (107B), Legal Writing (107L), and Advanced Legal Writing (110L). Additionally, she hosts two freshman seminar speaker series, one on law enforcement and one on the legal profession. Ms. Genova has been a member of the California State and Federal Bars since 1992 and retired in 2015 from her local litigation practice specializing in contract, small business and personal injury law.

genova@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94TG: Critical Thinking: the Most Important Thing You Learn as a University Student
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Mondays
0600-0650
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  54668

Critical thinking forms the core of diverse human activities, including but not limited to science. Arguing from evidence is a skill that can be developed. We will read papers on diverse topics ranging from science and medicine, to law. Students engage in in class discussions and submit short, weekly summaries of the material.

Professor of Biochemistry with a focus on epigenetics, drug discovery, enzymes, drug delivery. I also have an interest in improving the public's understanding of how science works through the SciTrek outreach program which I started to help K-12 students and teachers.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music – Live!
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Tuesday, March 6, 2018 and Thursday, March 15, 2018
4:00-4:50 PM
MUSIC 2224
~and~
Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 7:30 p.m. (Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall: Wind Ensemble)
Friday, March 9, 2018 - 7:30 p.m.  (Trinity Episcopal Church: Chamber Choir and Women’s Chorus)
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 7:30 p.m.  (Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall: Jazz Ensemble)
*all free to UCSB students

Enrollment Code:        27870

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94UK: The Fantastic Short-Story: Theory and Practice
Professor Jorge Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese

Mondays
0900-0950
HSSB 1206

This course will study the Fantastic Short Story in the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries with a particular focus in Latin America.  The seminar will offer a survey of the historical development of the genre in the last two centuries but also of the particular narrative techniques of fantastic short fiction.  The course could also be a workshop in which the participants will experiment with the genre and its conventions by employing these techniques to write fantastic short fiction.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94UN: Arts and Politics of Puppetry:  Creativity and the Santa Barbara Puppet Festival
Professor Ruth Hellier-Tinoco, Music

Thursdays - January 18, February 1st and 15th, March 15th, 2018
0500-0550
Excursion - Thursday, March 1, 2018
0500-0950
TD-W 1703

Enrollment Code:  54700

Moveable models known as puppets have long been used in multiple world contexts to entertain, to teach, to satirize leaders, and to inspire. Through creative workshops, with historiographical contextualization, this course engages with the first puppet festival in Santa Barbara (March 2018), to include hands-on events-based sessions with professional companies.

As a creative artist and scholar, Professor Hellier-Tinoco combines interests in performing arts, politics, Mexican studies, identity and environmental issues. Dr. Hellier-Tinoco teaches in the departments of music and theater/dance, with affiliations in feminist studies and Latin American and Iberian Studies, with expertise in experimental performance-making and contemporary politics.

rhellier-tinoco@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Justice
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing

Tuesdays
1200-1250
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  61093

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Professor Samuels has been teaching for 20 years, is the author of 11 published books and earned his PhDs in English and Psychoanalysis. He is currently writing a book on Global Justice.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

INT 94UP: "We Are Gauchos": Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor Kathy Patterson, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  61358

This seminar explores local sites, artifacts, and practices that illustrate how what we remember and forget about our shared past shapes who we are in the present. Memory studies and local history will inform field observation and archival research aimed at understanding who we are as"Gauchos."

Kathy Patterson is a Continuing Lecturer in the Writing Program. Her interest in memory studies stems from her doctoral work in Southern Studies and Disability Studies. She teaches a memory themed entry-level writing course and an upper division Humanities writing course focused on collective memory, commemoration, and memorialization.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

INT 94UQ: Math, Meet Ecology!
Professor Holly Moeller, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

Fridays
1200-1250
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  61481

The ecosystems that support and sustain us are full of diverse living organisms that interact with one another in complex ways. Biologists often use mathematical models to make sense of this complexity. This seminar develops the intuition behind these approaches, and uses models to address diverse problems in environmental science and conservation.

Dr. Holly Moeller is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. She studies the ecology and evolution of metabolic interactions among species using a combination of mathematical models, field work, and laboratory experiments. Her study systems range widely from tree-fungal mutualisms, to coral reefs, to chloroplast-stealing microbes.

holly.moeller@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94US: The Trojan War: an Historical Event or Fiction?
Professor Ralph Gallucci, Classics

Wednesdays
0200-0250
HSSB 1232

Enrollment Code: 66688

Perhaps the most famous story in Greek mythology is the tale of the Trojan War. Until the 1960's most classical scholars believed that the Trojan War was an historical event.  Today the majority of scholars deny any reality behind the legend. We will examine why this change has occurred.

Ralph Gallucci received his Ph.D. in Greek and Roman History at UCLA in 1986 and teaches in the Classics Department and Honors Program. Ralph has mentored numerous undergraduate research projects. His publications are in the areas of Athenian democracy and Homeric studies, especially the interconnections of memory, legend, and history.

gallucci@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94UT: Oral Interpreting: Hands on!
Professor Aline Alves Ferreira, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Fridays
0900-1050
ARTS 1349

Enrollment Code:  67116

This course comprises topics that are necessary to develop skills necessary for interpreting and to carry out interpretation into and from Spanish and/or Portuguese.

Aline Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Linguistics (Department of Spanish and Portuguese). Her main topics of interests are: Written Translation, Oral Interpreting, Bilingualism, Heritage Languages, and Second Language Acquisition. Her main topics of interests are: Written Translation, Oral Interpreting, Bilingualism, Heritage Languages, and Second Language Acquisition.

aferreira@spanport.ucsb.edu

Winter 2018 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AB: Race, Gender, and Political Representation in America
Professor Pei-te Lien, Political Science

1st 7 Wednesdays
0200-0315
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  54486

This course introduces concepts of political representation and explores how identity labels such as race or gender as well as the intersection of the two may create both obstacles and opportunities for individuals of African/Black, American Indian, Asian/Pacific, Latina/Hispanic, and White/Anglo background to attain public office.

Born and raised in Taiwan, Pei-te Lien is a professor of Political Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who also holds professorship in Asian American, Feminist, and Black Studies.  She is the author of numerous publications on the political participation and representation of Asian and other nonwhite Americans.

plien@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 186AC: On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources
Professor Clarence Barlow, Music

1st 6 Tuesdays
0300-0450
MUSIC 1145

Enrollment Code:  54569

On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources: six illustrated lectures (100 minutes each plus a short break, 10 hours in all) in which Prof. Barlow demonstrates how music can be derived from language, other musics and algorithms. He will profusely illustrate his lectures with examples of his own music, occasionally referring to music by contemporary colleagues.

After teaching composition in the Netherlands and Germany for 22 years, Professor Clarence Barlow took up the position of Corwin Chair and Composition Program Head at UCSB\'s Music Department in 2006. His main interest is computer-aided composition for acoustic and electronic instruments, often derived from musical and extramusical sources.

barlow@music.ucsb.edu

INT 186AD: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah deVries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Fridays
1200-0150
PSBN 4606

Enrollment Code:   61507

Gallup Polls show that two thirds of Americans do not think global warming is a threat and almost half of all Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should we really worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternative medicine really quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say?  Should schools and universities teach all sides of these controversies? Explore the history, politics, and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 186AG: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life
Professor Elizabeth Wilbanks, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology

Thursdays
1000-1050
Bldg 387, Room 103 (located next to PSYCH building)

Enrollment Code:  67108

Do you consider yourself an individual, a single organism?  Have you ever thought about how your symbiotic microbes make your body its own ecosystem?  In this seminar, we will explore the microbial world around and within us using Ed Yong’s recent pop-science book “I Contain Multitudes.”  Whatever your background, this seminar will shift your perspective on biology and maybe even your sense of self.  Weekly meetings will be discussion based, and will emphasize both critical analysis of the data behind the story and the art of conversation.  We'll try to take class outside to explore different microbial habitats on campus while we discuss the reading.

Lizzy Wilbanks is a microbiologist and an assistant professor, new to UCSB in Fall 2017.  Her research maps how marine microbes interact with one another and shape global nutrient cycles, using methods like DNA sequencing, stable isotope analysis, and microscopy.

elizabeth.wilbanks@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Winter 2018 - Transfer Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 187AA: Child's Play? Learning the Science Behind Child Development
Professor Zoe Liberman Psychological & Brain Sciences
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
0400-0550
GIRV 2119

Enrollment Code:  59238

How should we raise our children? How do children learn most effectively? What are the implications of new media on learning and development? We will explore these questions (any many more!) through reading and discussing "The Gardner & The Carpenter," by renowned psychologist (and UC Berkeley professor) Allison Gopnik.

Zoe Liberman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her research focus in on the development of human social cognition. She is most interested in questions about whether infants divide the world into social groups, and how these social groups may impact subsequent thinking and learning.

Tamsin German is a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her work concerns the foundations of human ability to understand the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thought, such as moral reasoning, scientific thinking and belief in the supernatural.

liberman@psych.ucsb.edu

Fall 2017 - Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AA: Latin America: History and Culture
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesdays
1000-1150
PHELP 1425

Enrollment Code:  64857

Co-taught Course (Professors Cortijo and Castillo)

This seminar will provide insight into the history and culture of Latin America by focusing on the conflictive interplay between autonomous populations (Native Americans, Africans and Creoles) and their European counterparts. Divided into two sections, the seminar will focus on the most representative texts (historical and literary) that have shaped the cultures of the New World across Colonial, Independence and Contemporary times. The seminar is interdisciplinary and will combine and analysis of history, ideology, and literature of the Americas

Professor Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th  centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. He is the author of over 40 monographs and editions.

Professor Castillo’s areas of instruction and research include: Nineteenth and twentieth-century Spanish-American literature, from the Romantics to the Avant-Garde, with a special focus on Hispanic Modernismo and Posmodernismo. Additional areas of interest: poetry and poetics; modern philosophy and history of ideas; contemporary literary theory; Cuban and Puerto Rican literature; nineteenth century Peninsular, and contemporary Spanish-American literature.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

Fall 2017 - Exploration Seminars

INT 94FH: Moving Forward: Disability in Film and Television-- History of Stereotyping and Change
Professor George Singer, Education

Fridays
1200-1250
HSSB 1236

Enrollment Code:  26641

In this seminar students will watch and discuss parts of classic films in the history of the portrayal of people with disabilities. It will begin with early depictions of freak shows and monsters and move through time to South Park and Game of Thrones. The way that changing attitudes about human differences are reflected in these cultural artifacts will be examined. The seminar will meet weekly for 10 weeks. Reading assignments will complement the films and lectures. Students will be encouraged to examine their own attitudes about physical, intellectual, and emotional disabilities. Contemporary ideas about how disability is defined and situated in a social power structure will be discussed. If you have given little thought to this topic the seminar is an enjoyable way to look into a new area through great films and television.

Professor Singer works in the Graduate School of Education in the field of Special Education and grew up in a family where close relatives experienced disabilities and so the areas of disability studies and special education have been life long interests.  Prior to becoming an academic he had several jobs and roles including that of a Zen Buddhist monk, a carpenter, goat herd, special education teacher, director of a non profit group home agency, and vocational trainer.  Professor Singer worked as a special education teacher and then as a behavior specialist. After earning a doctorate in Special Education from the University of Oregon he became a Research Scientist at the Oregon Research Institute where he developed his long term focus on families of individuals with severe disabilities. Professor Singer is a published poet and aspiring novelist.  This seminar comes out of a  fascination with movies and their power to bring us close to people who at first seem very different than oneself.  Professor Singer is a grandfather of six and father of three and have a terrific goldendoodle.

singer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Department of Art

1ST 5 Tuesdays
0100-0250
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code:  26658

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show and PBS, and has exhibited and performed in over 20 countries.  He is the author several books and the recipient of many awards including the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

seaweed@arts.ucsb.edu

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano Studies

1st 5 Wednesdays
0100-0250 pm
PHELP 2532

Enrollment Code: 26666

This seminar focuses on contemporary political issues including both domestic and international ones.  Issues can range from presidential politics to the threat of terrorism around the world.  Each week students will report on a contemporary issue with a related question for the class to discuss.

Prof. Mario T. Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He has published widely on Chicano/Latino immigration, civil rights, leadership, and religion.  He teaches courses on Introduction to Chicano Studies, Chicano History of the 20th century, the Chicano Movement, Latino Autobiography and History, and Chicano/Latino Religions.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420 PM
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code: 26708

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duiganâ’s Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JM: Debates about Evolution
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  52613

A great public debate exists on the teaching of evolution in our schools. What are the issues involved? What are the merits of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design?  What are the distinguishing characteristics of science and how well does each of these qualify to be taught in a science course? We will discuss the issues surrounding this important contemporary debate.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94OS:Women and Representation
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, Department of English

Tuesdays
0100-0150
SH 2617

Enrollment Code:  52639

In this seminar we will concentrate on the way women have reclaimed the power to represent themselves, to tell their own stories, in literature.  We will discuss issues of domesticity, sexuality, money and independence, women and professions, female anger, women and writing. The texts ill include Charlotte Bronte' s 'Jane Eyre', Jean Rhys' 'Wide sargasso Sea', Jeannette Winterson's 'Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit', Edwige Danticat's 'Breath, Eyes, Memory'.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English, affiliated with the Department of Feminist Studies and with the Program of Comparative Literature. She specializes in Twentieth and Twentieth Century literature and culture, gender studies, and critical theory. Professor Boscagli teaches classes on women and literature, women and film, modern masculinities, as well as on the city and urban space, work and not doing, and the everyday. She is the author of 'Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century' (1996), and 'Stuff Theory: Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism' (2014)

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450 PM
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 26765

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdadnce.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Freshman Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise Sport Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150
RECEC 2103

Enrollment Code: 26807

This seminar provides an overview of information related to basic health and wellness topics.  Reveal and explore wellbeing within the context of college life and beyond.  Topics include, fitness, nutrition, sleep, stress management, mental health.  Students will be introduced to resources on campus with focus on recognizing strategies to navigate a healthy lifestyle.

Amy Jamieson is a senior faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies. Amy's education and experience is in Exercise and Health Science. She is a certified Nutritionist and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UCSB. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee and the Academic Advisor for the ESS Certificate Programs.  As the faculty coordinator for the ESS Independent Study program, she provides students with numerous internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94SY: Psychology of Dudes: Boys, Men, and Masculinity
Professor Steve Smith, Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Wednesdays
0900-0950
GIRV 2110

Enrollment Code:  26856

In this seminar, we will discuss the psychology of masculinity from childhood through adulthood. We will read about masculine stereotypes, destructive/aggressive images, relationships, and sports.  We will take field trips to sporting events and other settings to observe and discuss images of masculinity, manhood, and boyhood.  Finally, we will discuss how both good and bad aspects of men and masculinity are impacting the UCSB community.

Dr. Steve Smith is an associate professor of clinical psychology in the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology.  His work (both clinical and research) involves diversity issues in psychological assessment, psychological needs of athletes, and psychotherapy with men and boys.  He is an avid trail runner and frequenter of coffee shops.

ssmith@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94TG: Critical thinking: the Most Important Thing You Will Likely Learn as a University Student
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Wednesdays
0600-0650 PM
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:  26914

We will read and discuss papers on critical thinking covering broad disciplines, including but not limited to science.

Science research on epigenetics, enzyme mechanisms, drug design, drug delivery.Science education research on how to improve large lecture format courses to engage students in critical thinking, in teaching K-12 students how science works.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live!
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Tuesday, November 28, 2017
4:00-5:50 PM
MUSIC 2224
~and~
ON SITE/OFF SITE EXCURSIONS
Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 7:00-8:00 pm (Karl Geiringer Hall: Flute Ensemble Concert)
Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 7:30-9:30 pm  (Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall: Wind Ensemble Concert)
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 7:30-9:30 pm (Trinity Episcopal Church at 1500 State St: Chamber Choir and Women’s Chorus)
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 7:30-9:30 pm (Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall: Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players Concert)

Enrollment Code: 26930

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend a student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Enrolled students gather before each concert for a 15-minute lecture and discussion about the music to be performed that evening. The mini-lecture highlights specific points about the composer's lives, the cultures they lived in that gave rise to the music, and so forth.  The lecture may also address specific aspects of the music, though in a non-technical (music appreciation) manner. Attendance at all Department of Music concerts in the term and mini-lecture, is required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist British Culture
Professor Enda Duffy, English

3 consecutive Fridays:
Friday, September 29
Friday, October 6
Friday, October 13
at 10:00-11:50 am
GIRV 1106
~and~
Excursion as follows:
Saturday, October 21
10:00-2:00 pm

Enrollment Code:  26948

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed.  This course surveys these changes with a focus on London, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine 'Blast.' This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature: we then spend a half day interacting with the art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum Fall exhibition, 'British Modernism.'  

Enda Duffy is a Professor of English and Comparative Literature.  He is the author of 'The Subaltern Ulysses' and 'The Speed Handbook' and many articles, co-editor of 'Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism, ' and other books.  His newest work is on energy in twentieth-century culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94TK: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
0300-0350
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  26955

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TW: Food Writing: The Good, the Bad, and the Distasteful
Professor Katie Baillargeon, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0900-0950
HSSB 2202

Enrollment Code:  68577       

Tasty videos by Buzzfeed, food blogs, #Instafood, Yelp: all demonstrate how food writing has grown beyond its traditional cookbook and review genres. This seminar explores various visual and textual genres of food writing and, via select readings, emphasizes how to write about food and understand the issues most current in the field.

Katie Baillargeon has a PhD in Musicology from UCSB and has taught in the Writing Program since 2008. Personally, she is fascinated by our cultural focus on food and has themed several research writing courses around food. She also used to sell her homemade cheesecakes in high school.

baillargeon@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94UH: Theatre Design and the WWE Smackdown: How We're Taking Chad Diety to Juneau and Anchorage
Professor Greg Mitchell, Theatre and Dance

Wednesdays
1000-1050
TD-W 2517 (new location)

Enrollment Code: 66381

We'll do a blow by blow breakdown of the lighting and set design process of a play about the commercialization of race and terrorism as it collides with the world of Pro Wrestling.  The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Diety is currently being designed by Professor Mitchell for Alaska's Perseverance Theatre Company.  In September the production will open in Juneau, but will later transfer to an fundamentally different theatre space in Anchorage in November during the fall quarter.  The practical and aesthetic complexities of this project will (pile)drive course.

Greg Mitchell is a designer of scenery, lighting, projections and costumes for theatre, dance, opera, festivals, and interactive installations around the globe.  His current work often involves site-specific designs in challenging locations and the interaction of media and technology with performance and installations.

gmitchell@ucsb.edu

INT 94UI: When Paintings Talk: Poetry About Visual Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Mondays
0100-0150
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  64485

We will read poems that engage is ekphrasis, descriptions of works of art, and discuss what happens when art finds its voice. Poems by Keats, Auden, Ashbery, Willams, and Hollander, and visual art works by Breughel, Turner, and Parmigianino, among others, will deepen our perspective on how visual art interacts with its viewers, the world, and other art forms. Students will be expected to read two or three poems in relation to several visual images each week while briefly recording their responses in a reading journal.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@ucsb.edu
 

INT 94UJ: Observing Behavior
Professor Michelle Brown, Anthropology

Fridays
0900-0950
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  70334

Observational methods are the cornerstone of behavioral studies on vertebrate and invertebrate species and are utilized by both anthropologists and ecologists. Students will learn a variety of techniques for documenting behavior by observing other UCSB students, dogs, and local wildlife in the Isla Vista environs (which are considered local excursions).

Professor Brown studies the behavioral ecology of non-human primates to understand the evolution of social systems, the interplay of cooperative and competitive actions, and the effects of environmental change on the behavior of individuals, groups, and populations.

mbrown@anth.ucsb.edu

INT 94UL: Designing for Learning
Professor Danielle Harlow, Education

Thursdays
0900-0950
ED 4219

Enrollment Code: 66373

We will consider how children learn by making things and how to design activities that encourage tinkering, exploration, and innovation. As part of this class, we will visit MOXI, the Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation and design our own interactive activities.

Danielle Harlow researches how children and their teachers learn science and engineering through making things. She has also been a content advisor to the exhibits team at MOXI. Prior to UCSB, she earned a PhD in Education and taught physics in Tanzania as a Peace Corps volunteer.

dharlow@education.ucsb.edu

Fall 2017 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AA – Babies for Sale: Biological Commodities in the 21rst Century
Professor France Winddance Twine, Sociology

Wednesdays
0100-0150
HSSB 1233

Enrollment Code: 64493

This interdisciplinary seminar will introduce students to debates and dilemmas in the global market in biological commodities. The topics covered will include the sale and rental of wombs, blood, organs, semen, ovum and other genetic material.  (blood, organs, semen, ovum and other genetical material). Students will learn about this issue across several national contexts including China, India, Egypt, Israel, the United Kingdom, United States and the European Union.

France Winddance Twine is a Black and Native American Professor of Sociology whose research focuses upon the intersections of racial, gender and class inequality across several national contexts. Her current research focuses upon assisted reproductive technologies, inequality in the tech industry, and Black Europe. She is the author and/ or editor of 10 books. Her recent publications include Outsourcing the Womb: race, class and gestational surrogacy in a global market (2015), Geographies of Privilege (2013) and A White Side of Black Britain: interracial intimacy and racial literacy (2010).

winddance@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 186AB - Race, Gender, and Political Representation in America
Professor Pei-te Lien, Political Science

1st 7 Mondays
0200-0315
HSSB 1233 (note new location!)

Enrollment Code: 70326

This course introduces concepts of political representation and explores how identity labels such as race or gender as well as the intersection of the two may create both obstacles and opportunities for individuals of African/Black, American Indian, Asian/Pacific, Latina/Hispanic, and White/Anglo background to attain public office.

Born and raised in Taiwan, Pei-te Lien is a professor of Political Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who also holds professorship in Asian American, Feminist, and Black Studies.  She is the author of numerous publications on the political participation and representation of Asian and other nonwhite Americans.

plien@polsci.ucsb.edu

Fall 2016

INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes 2016
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Friday, September 30
Monday, October 3
Tuesday, October 4
Wednesday, October 5
Friday, October 7
Monday, October 10

1030-1150 AM
PSBN 4606

Enrollment Code: 26062

In the first week of October the 2016 Nobel prizes will be announced: Medicine on Monday, Physics on Tuesday, Chemistry on Wednesday, Peace on Friday. We will follow the announcements on each of those days, press conferences, worldwide reactions and background. We will find out how one gets nominated and we will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94FH: Moving Forward: Disability In Film And Television-- History Of Stereotyping And Change
Professor George Singer, Education

Fridays
1200-1250 PM
HSSB 1236

Enrollment Code: 58214

In this seminar students will watch and discuss parts of classic films in the history of the portrayal of people with disabilities. It will begin with early depictions of freak shows and monsters and move through time to South Park and Game of Thrones. The way that changing attitudes about human differences are reflected in these cultural artifacts will be examined. The seminar will meet weekly for 10 weeks. Reading assignments will complement the films and lectures. Students will be encouraged to examine their own attitudes about physical, intellectual, and emotional disabilities. Contemporary ideas about how disability is defined and situated in a social power structure will be discussed. If you have given little thought to this topic the seminar is an enjoyable way to look into a new area through great films and television. 

I work as a  Professor in the Graduate School of Education in the field of Special Education. I grew up in a family where close relatives experienced disabilities and so the areas of disability studies and special education have been life long interests.  Prior to becoming an academic I had several jobs and roles including that of a Zen Buddhist monk, a carpenter, goat herd, special education teacher, director of a non profit group home agency, and vocational trainer.  I worked as a special education teacher and then as a behavior specialist. After earning a doctorate in Special Education from the University of Oregon I became a Research Scientist at the Oregon Research Institute where I developed my long term focus on families of individuals with severe disabilities. I am a published poet and aspiring novelist.  This seminar comes out of a  fascination with movies and their power to bring us close to people who at first seem very different than oneself.  I'm a grandfather of six and father of three and have a terrific goldendoodle.

singer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
0100-0250 PM
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code: 58222

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show and PBS, and has exhibited and performed in over 20 countries.  He is the author several books and the recipient of many awards including the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano Studies

1st 5 Wednesdays
0200-0350 pm
HSSB 1236

Enrollment Code: 58230

This seminar focuses on contemporary political issues including both domestic and international ones.  Issues can range from presidential politics to the threat of terrorism around the world.  Each week students will report on a contemporary issue with a related question for the class to discuss.

Prof. Mario T. Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He has published widely on Chicano/Latino immigration, civil rights, leadership, and religion.  He teaches courses on Introduction to Chicano Studies, Chicano History of the 20th century, the Chicano Movement, Latino Autobiography and History, and Chicano/Latino Religions.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

Saturday, October 15
1000 - 12:00 pm,
ARTS 2622
~and~
Saturday, October 22
0830 - 0530 pm
field trip

Enrollment Code: 26088

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HI:  Know Your Brain!
Professor Benjamin Reese, Psychological & Brain Sciences

1st 3 Saturdays
September 24, October 1 and 8th
0900-1220pm
PSY-E 3834

Enrollment Code:  49031

This combined lecture/laboratory/discussion class will meet on three sequential Saturday mornings, addressing the neural substrates underlying perception, memory and motor control.  The first hour of each class will introduce brain structures underlying these behaviors and how they function, while the second hour will take place in the laboratory, with students conducting sheep brain dissections of these structures.  The third hour will be a discussion section in which we consider the neurological consequences of damage to these structures.   

Benjamin Reese is a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, studying the development and plasticity of the nervous system.  He received his B.A. degree in Experimental Psychology from UCSB in 1980, and completed his post-graduate and post-doctoral training at Oxford University before joining the faculty at UCSB in 1989.

breese@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0500-0550 PM
TD-W 2517

Enrollment Code:  26096

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative, even artistic? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420 PM
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code: 58248

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duiganâ’s Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
0200-0250 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 58255

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrotâ’s fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper’s main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94LQ: On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources
Professor Clarence Barlow, Music

1st 6 Tuesdays
0300-0450 PM
MUSIC 1145

Enrollment Code: 26138

On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources: six illustrated lectures (100 minutes each plus a short break) in which Prof. Barlow demonstrates how music can be derived from language, other musics and algorithms. He will profusely illustrate his lectures with examples of his own music, occasionally referring to music by contemporary colleagues.

After teaching composition in the Netherlands and Germany for 22 years, Prof.  Clarence Barlow took up the position of Corwin Chair and Composition Program Head at UCSB's Music Department in 2006. His main interest is computer-aided composition for acoustic and electronic instruments, often derived from musical and extramusical sources.

barlow@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94ME: Moral Paradoxes
Professor Matthew Hanser, Philosophy

Fridays
1100-1150 AM
HSSB 1210

Enrollment Code:  68361

An introduction to problems in moral philosophy via discussion of a number of "moral paradoxes."

Professor Matthew Hanser works primarily on problems in moral philosophy, philosophy of law, and philosophy of action.

hanser@philosophy.ucsb.edu

INT 94NF: Greek Archaeology in Action
Professor Brice Erickson, Classics

1st 6 Wednesdays
0100-0150
PHELP 1160
~including~
Field trip to Malibu Getty
Saturday, October 29, 2016
0900-0400 pm

Enrollment Code:  65466

Archaeology is a discipline best described as the study of past cultures though their tangible remains.  This seminar will provide the rare experience of direct exposure to the study of Greek artifacts in museum settings.  We will come face to face with Greek pots and other artifacts in the UCSB Art Museum collection and on a field trip to the Malibu Getty Museum.   Introductory sessions will prepare students for understanding the cultural contexts of this material.

Professor Erickson is a Greek archaeologist with a specialization in pottery studies, the ancient economy, and cultural interaction.

berickson@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94OT: Democratizing Gender: Reimagining Gender Roles and Relations Today
Professor Edwina Barvosa, Feminist Studies

1st 5 Wednesdays
0300-0450 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 53751

This seminar explores the interconnection between two key elements that shape our lives: democracy & gender. The possibilities raised by these two factors remain hotly debated today. Here we will explore whether gender practices, including old and new gender inequities, might be usefully transformed by democratizing the social practices through which gender relations are made and remade.

Professor Edwina Barvosa is a political scientist specializing in social and political theory, and racial, ethnic and gender studies. She earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her M.A. from Cambridge University. Her gender related research focuses on how gender inequities that affect both men and woman can be transformed through social reconstructions in which anyone can take part.

barvosa@femst.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Mondays
0400-0450 PM
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 58313

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdadnce.ucsb.edu

INT 94QJ: The Problem with Work
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Tuesdays
1230-0120 PM
SH 2617

Enrollment Code: 56267

Why do we want to work and why is work so important in defining who we are? Could a world without work be possible? What are the values attached to the work ethic? The seminar approaches these questions through the fiction of Herman Melville, Jumpha Lahiri, and Raymond Carver and others.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and Feminist Studies. She teaches classes on women's cultural production, twentieth and twenty-first century literature and culture, space and urban studies. Her books include _Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century_, and, more recently, _Stuff Theory. Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism. She is now working on a new book length project on work and the politics of not doing.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94QV: History of War
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Tuesdays
1100-1150 AM
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code: 26203

Analysis of the history of war from an ideological point of view (origin, causes, ideologies involved, empires, weapons, etc.)

Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. He is the author of 30 books and 160 articles.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94RK: What is Life?
Professor Luc Jaeger, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tuesdays
0500-0550 PM
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code: 58321

This seminar series is essentially intended to provide a deeper understanding of Life and its origin from scientific, philosophical and religious perspectives. Rather than opposing science and religion, this class aims at reconciling these two visions of the world, which both originate from a common quest for truth. Implications for the future of science and civilization will be discussed.

Dr. Jaeger joined the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department in 2002. He has been full professor since 2012. His highly interdisciplinary research encompasses fields as diverse as RNA biochemistry and biophysics, nucleic acid nanotechnology, material sciences, synthetic biology and nanomedicine. He is also interested in the dialogue between science and religion.

jaeger@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Freshman Health and Wellness
Amy Jamieson, Exercise and Sports Studies

Wednesdays
0100-0150 PM
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code: 53272

This seminar provides an overview of information related to basic health and wellness topics.  Reveal and explore wellbeing within the context of college life and beyond.  Topics include, fitness, nutrition, sleep, stress management, mental health.  Students will be introduced to resources on campus with focus on recognizing strategies to navigate a healthy lifestyle.

Amy Jamieson is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies.  She has over 18 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94SP: The U-See Project
Professor Norman Bradley, Writing Program

1st 5 Monday & Wednesdays
0400-0450 PM
GIRV 2127

Enrollment Code:  63768

In this seminar students will help build the U*See project--a program to locate QR codes within Santa Barbara County that link to content authored by UCSB students and faculty, including local history, walking tours, photos, and multimedia. Seminar students will work together to turn UCSB inside-out by changing local public spaces into living classrooms and build a template for other campuses to follow.  Help support this innovative and far-ranging educational outreach effort!

Norman Douglas "Doug" Bradley is in his 16th year teaching STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) writing and science communication within the UCSB Writing Program; he is also a UCSB alum (B.A., 1985).  Prior to teaching at UCSB, Doug worked as a project engineer and technical writer at several California high-tech firms.

bradley@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94SR: Film Noir
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Tuesdays
1200-1250 PM
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code: 58347

In this course we shall discuss ten classic instances of film noir, or black film.  As our class time is very limited, students will watch these films each week at home.  Student evaluation will be based upon quizzes, viewer response essays, and class participation. 

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary political philosophy, though he has also written on film, contemporary American politics, and Heidegger.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94SW: Terrifying Beauty: Aesthetics and the Sublime in Romantic Poetry, Music, and Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0100-0150 PM
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code: 58354

The sound of a Beethoven symphony, the sight of waves breaking on the shore, and the suggestive rhythms of a Romantic poem all move us deeply, but we hardly know why. Together, we will see, hear, and contemplate theory and the practice of sublime and the beautiful in Romanticism.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94SX: How Children Make War and Peace
Professor Sabine Fruhstuck, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies

Mondays
0200-0250 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 49023

This seminar is about childhood, war, and play in Japan and elsewhere. It is designed to show and critically analyze how children and childhood have been used as technologies to validate, moralize, humanize, and naturalize war throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first century.

Sabine Fruhstuck is interested in the study of modern and contemporary Japanese culture and its relationship to the rest of the world. She writes mostly about mass violence, the military, sexuality, gender, power, and knowledge systems.

fruhstuck@eastasian.ucsb.edu

INT 94SY: Psychology of Dudes: Boys, Men, and Masculinity
Professor Steve Smith, Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Wednesdays
0900-0950 AM
GIRV 2110

Enrollment Code: 49049

In this seminar, we will discuss the psychology of masculinity from childhood through adulthood. We will read about masculine stereotypes, destructive/aggressive images, relationships, and sports.  We will take field trips to sporting events and other settings to observe and discuss images of masculinity, manhood, and boyhood.  Finally, we will discuss how both good and bad aspects of men and masculinity are impacting the UCSB community. 

Dr. Steve Smith is an associate professor of clinical psychology in the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology.  His work (both clinical and research) involves diversity issues in psychological assessment, psychological needs of athletes, and psychotherapy with men and boys.  He is an avid trail runner and frequenter of coffee shops.

ssmith@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94TB:  Ancient Ideas for Modern Times
Professor Helen Morales, Classics

Fridays
1000-1050
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:  67694

Where do our ideals about beautiful bodies come from? Why do newspapers compare America's 'immigration crisis' with the fall of ancient Rome? How would psychoanalysis have been different had Freud been influenced by the myth of Antigone, not the myth of Oedipus? What has Kanye West to do with Cicero?   Greek and Roman antiquity is a common vehicle for thinking about our world today. This course will explore some of these interactions and introduce students to key classical authors and ideas along the way.

Helen Morales is the Argyropoulos Professor of Hellenic Studies. She has written books on the ancient Greek novel, Greek mythology, and Dolly Parton's theme park, Dollywood.

hmorales@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TC: Self-Driving Cars and Green Futures
Professor Konstadinos Goulias, Geography

Wednesday, October 12 – PSY-E 1806
Wednesday, October 19 – HSSB 3202
Wednesday, October 26 – HSSB 3202
Wednesday, November 2 – HSSB 3202
Wednesday, November 9 – PSY-E 1806

Enrollment Code: 53280

Self-driving cars can help us save lives, decrease emissions, and use resources in a sustainable way. Can they really do that?  This course will answer this question by exploring experiments, current technology, and future developments using scientific papers, popular press, and online media.  GeoTrans graduate students and the instructor will lead structured brainstorming sessions about designing the future.  

Konstadinos G. Goulias is a professor of transportation at the University of California Santa Barbara Department of Geography and director of the GeoTrans laboratory. He is an expert of Travel Behavior and Transportation Systems Analysis with experience in Australia, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Portugal, and the United States.

goulias@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94TD: Got Mindfulness?  Learn How Kobe Bryant, Russell Brand, Katy Perry, Eva Mendes, and Emma Watson Manage Their Stress!
Professor Heidi Zetzer, Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology

Last 7 Wednesdays
0300-0415 PM
ED 1205

Enrollment Code:  53744

It's not easy being a celebrity.  It's almost as hard as being a first year student!  That's  why these celebrities practice mindfulness-based stress reduction. In this seminar you will learn helpful mindfulness practices as well as how to understand, interpret, and critique research on its scientific foundations and effectiveness.

Dr. Heidi A. Zetzer is the Director of the Hosford Counseling & Psychological Services Clinic and a Lecturer in the Department of Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology. Dr. Zetzer teaches helping skills courses, supervises graduate student therapists and teaches about mindfulness, stress reduction, and helping people change.

hzetzer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94TE: Contemporary Cuban/ Puerto Rican Short Stories
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish & Portuguese

Mondays
0100-0150 PM
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code:  58362

A survey course focused on a variety of short stories that have emerged in Cuba and Puerto Rico since 1970.

Professor Castillo was born in Cuba and raised in Puerto Rico. He has published two books and a variety of scholarly articles on Spanish American Modernismo and Posmodernismo. He is also a novelist and short story writer interested in Cuban and Puerto Rican narrative.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94TF: Dedicated to Serve: Local Law Enforcement Uncensored
Professor Gina Genova, Writing Program

Wednesdays: September 28, October 5 and 26, November 9 and 16, 2016
0600-0750P
ARTS 1356

Enrollment Code:  66407

Candid and uncensored, learn what it's really like straight from insiders at five local law enforcement agencies: SBPD, IVFP, CSI, DA, County Jail.  We will curate questions for speakers to address after they explain their function and fit within our community. A course blog will be created after each visit.

Gina L. Genova, Esq. is a Continuing Lecturer with UCSB's Writing Program, teaching writing for business, law and public speaking. A member of the California State and Federal Bars since 1992, Ms. Genova recently retired from her civil litigation practice specializing in business disputes and torts.

genova@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94TG: Critical thinking: the Most Important Thing You Will Likely Learn as a University Student
Professor Norbert Reich, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tuesdays
0600-0650 PM
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:  58370

We will read and discuss papers on critical thinking covering broad disciplines, including but not limited to science.

Science research on epigenetics, enzyme mechanisms, drug design, drug delivery.Science education research on how to improve large lecture format courses to engage students in critical thinking, in teaching K-12 students how science works.

reich@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94TH: What is Computing?
Professor Omer Egecioglu, Computer Science

Tuesdays
0100-0150 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:  58388

With the belief that the fundamental concepts in computing can be explained without getting lost in the details and mathematical symbols, this course aims at a discussion of the essence of what computing is to a general audience. The students will gain some insight into the foundations of this fascinating human endeavor. No experience necessary.

Omer Egecioglu received the PhD degree in Mathematics from the UC San Diego, in 1984. At present, he is a professor in the Computer Science Department at the UC Santa Barbara, where he has been on the faculty since 1985.His principal areas of research are algorithms,  bijective and enumerative combinatorics, and combinatorial algorithms. His current interest in parallel algorithms involves approximation and numerical techniques on distributed memory systems while his combinatorial interests center around computational geometry, algorithms on strings, bijective methods, and ranking algorithms for combinatorial structures.

omer@cs.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Thursday, October 13 and Tuesday, November 29, 2016
4:00-4:50pm
2224 Music
~and~
following excursions:
Sunday, October 16, 2016 (Trinity Episcopal Church)
Thursday, November 17, 2016 (University Wind Ensemble at Lotte Lehmann Concert hall)
Monday, November 28, 2016 (Chamber Orchestra & Chamber Players at Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall)
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Enrollment Code:  72009

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend a student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Enrolled students gather before each concert for a 15-minute lecture and discussion about the music to be performed that evening. The mini-lecture highlights specific points about the composer’s lives, the cultures they lived in that gave rise to the music, and so forth.  The lecture may also address specific aspects of the music, though in a non-technical (music appreciation) manner. Attendance at five Department of Music concerts in the term, preceded by the mini-lecture, is required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist British Culture
Professor Enda Duffy, English

Fridays - September 30, October 7 and 14
1000-1150 am
GIRV 1106
~and~
Friday - October 21
0930-0120 pm
Santa Barbara Art Museum downtown

Enrollment Code:  58396

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed.  This course surveys these changes with a focus on London, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine Blast. This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature: we then spend a half day interacting with the art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum Fall exhibition, 'British Modernism.'  This course meets 3 Friday mornings, Sept. 30, Oct. 7, 14, 10-12am, and then for 4 hours on Fri. Oct. 21 at the Santa Barbara Art Museum downtown, 9.30-1.30, with lunch.

Enda Duffy is a Professor of English and Comparative Literature.  He is the author of The Subaltern Ulysses and The Speed Handbook and many articles, co-editor of Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism, and other books.  His newest work is on energy in twentieth-century culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94TK: Experimenting With The Fundamental Building Blocks Of The Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Fridays
0300-0350 PM
GIRV 2108

Enrollment Code:  58404

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll conclude by discussing the ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics. He does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider which involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TL: Physics of the Large Hadron Collider: A Guide for the Perplexed
Professor Jeffrey Richman, Physics

Wednesdays
0100-0150 PM
PHELP 1448

Enrollment Code:  58412

This seminar will explore the physics of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), including the discovery of the Higgs boson and the properties and interactions of elementary particles such as quarks, leptons, and gauge bosons. We will discuss the evidence for dark matter and the role of particles in cosmology and astrophysics. Finally, we will investigate the technologies used in the LHC and the impact of the LHC program on science and society.

Professor Jeffrey Richman is an experimental high energy physicist who currently works on the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. He has led one of the major CMS physics groups and has worked on the construction of the experiment. Professor Richman has taught elementary particle physics at both the undergraduate and graduate levels at UCSB, as well as at advanced schools around the world.

richman@hep.ucsb.edu

INT 94TM: HBO's Rome and the Fall of the Roman Republic
Professor Robert Morstein-Marx, Classics

Tuesdays
0900-0950 AM
PHELP 1440

Enrollment Code:  58420

Season 1 of HBO's Rome offered a compelling popularization of the dramatic story of the Fall of the Roman Republic. Learn about the history -- no less tumultuous than its cinematic re-creation -- and the larger-than-life, yet (mostly) historical characters on which it was based. Ponder the challenging choices made by its historical expert, its scriptwriters, and creators in bringing this complex alive on the screen: can popular entertainment be historically respectable?

Professor and former Chair of Classics specializing in Roman history, especially the last decades of the Roman Republic. Author or editor of three books in Roman Republican history, currently working on a book which takes a new perspective on Julius Caesar. A fan of responsible popularization of history in film, TV, print and digital media.

morstein@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TN: Puzzling Problems in Science and Technology
Professor Behrooz Parhami, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Wednesdays
0330-0420 PM
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code:   58446

Scientific research and technological development problems are puzzle-like in the sense of requiring insight and out-of-the-box thinking for their solution. Many of these problems are actually related to popular math/logic puzzles in terms of the pertinent insights and solution methods. In this 1-unit freshman seminar, 10 such problems are identified and linked to a number of puzzles, such as Sudoku (job-shop scheduling), word-search (search engines), and decoding of secret messages (cryptography).

Behrooz Parhami (PhD, UCLA 1973) is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and former Associate Dean for Academic Personnel, College of Engineering, at University of California, Santa Barbara, where he teaches and does research in computer arithmetic, parallel processing, and dependable computing. A Life Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of IET and British Computer Society, and recipient of several other awards (including a most-cited paper award from J. Parallel & Distributed Computing), he has written six textbooks and more than 280 peer-reviewed technical papers. Professionally, he serves on journal editorial boards and conference program committees and is also active in technical consulting.

parhami@ece.ucsb.edu

INT 94TO:  Nature Journaling: A Way to Connect to Your (New) Place
Professor LeeAnne Kryder, Writing Program

1st 5 Wednesdays
4:00-5:50 pm
HSSB 2202

Enrollment Code: 61648

Many great American "nature writers" --like Henry Thoreau, Edward Abbey, Terry Tempest Williams, and Mary Oliver--connected with the natural world through their nature journal.  We will explore one of UCSB's Nature Reserves and get to know the natural world of your new place through keeping a nature journal.

Dr. LeeAnne Kryder is based in the Writing Program and teaches for the Professional Writing Minor and other professional writing courses, including Writing for Environmental Professions. Within the Environmental Studies Department, she teaches American Environmental Literature. She works closely with campus sustainability efforts and believes in the power of place.

kryder@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94TP: The Cultural Significance of Dia de los Muertos/Day of the Dead
Professor Dolores Ines Casillas, Chicana and Chicano Studies

Three Fridays (October 14, 21, and 28)
0100-0250
SH 1623
~and~
Field Trip
Sunday, November 6

Enrollment Code:  65524

This course is divided into three meeting dates and offers students both a seminar style as well as a participatory element to studying the Day of the Dead. The first three meeting dates (two hours in length) are dedicated to reading about the history of Day of the Dead usually celebrated in the United States on November 1 or 2. Our last class meeting takes place, on Sunday, November 6, at a community Day of the Dead event (four to five hours) hosted by a local dual-immersion (Spanish-English) elementary school. Participants are required to take part in volunteer activities such as skull decorating, face painting, or baking traditional breads. (Knowledge of Spanish is helpful but not at all required.)

Dolores Ines Casillas is Associate Professor in the Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies and a Faculty Affiliate of Film & Media Studies and Applied Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).Her book, Sounds of Belonging: Public Advocacy on U.S. Spanish-language Radio examines how immigration politics throughout the twentieth century have shaped the character and growth of U.S. Spanish-language radio.  Sounds of Belonging has been cited in different media venues, such as, the Associated Press, Pacifica Radio, ABCNEWS.COM, BuzzFeed and National Public Radio (NPR).  Professor Casillas teaches an introductory course on Chicana/o Culture as well as upper division courses on Mexican/Chicano Oral Traditions, Barrio Popular Culture, Listening to Race, and Language, Power & Learning.

casillas@chicst.ucsb.edu

Winter 2017

INT 94ES: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Craig Carlson, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Fridays
2:00-2:50 pm
NH 1111

Enrollment Code: 27631

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology.  Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Dr. Carlson earned his BA degree at Colby College and his PhD in marine science at the University of Maryland where he investigated the role that marine microbes play in governing the carbon cycle of open ocean ecosystems. As a Postdoctoral scholar at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) he focused on the biogeochemistry of dissolved organic matter in ocean systems. He joined BIOS faculty in 1996 and remained there until joining EEMB in 2001. Dr. Carlson currently serves as Chair of EEMB and is a member of UCSB’s Marine Science Institute. He is lead PI or Co-PI on several federally sponsored projects in Microbial Oceanography.

Co-teaching with Stephen Poole, MCDB

carlson@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94ES: Exciting Developments in Biology Research
Professor Stephen Poole, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Fridays
2:00-2:50 pm
NH 1111

Enrollment Code: 27623

This seminar will explore topics related to current ongoing research within the departments of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology.  Students will learn about the latest developments from a variety of experts in fields ranging from molecular mechanisms of animal development to evolutionary studies of genomes to ecological effects of climate change.

Professor Poole is Chair of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. He earned his B.A. at Trinity College, and his Ph.D. at UCSD. His research areas are the molecular genetics of animal development, focusing on genes involved in development of external sense organs in Drosophila, and also contact-dependent growth inhibition in bacteria.

Co-teaching with Craig Carlson, EEMB.

poole@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94FH: Moving Forward: Disability in Film and Television-- History of Stereotyping and Change
Professor George Singer, Education

Wednesdays
12:00-12:50 pm
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code:  55913

In this seminar students will watch and discuss parts of classic films in the history of the portrayal of people with disabilities. It will begin with early depictions of freak shows and monsters and move through time to South Park and Game of Thrones. The way that changing attitudes about human differences are reflected in these cultural artifacts will be examined. The seminar will meet weekly for 10 weeks. Reading assignments will complement the films and lectures. Students will be encouraged to examine their own attitudes about physical, intellectual, and emotional disabilities. Contemporary ideas about how disability is defined and situated in a social power structure will be discussed. If you have given little thought to this topic the seminar is an enjoyable way to look into a new area through great films and television.

Professor Singer is in the Graduate School of Education and works in the field of Special Education. He grew up in a family where close relatives experienced disabilities and so the areas of disability studies and special education have been life long interests.  Prior to becoming an academic Professor Singer had several jobs and roles including that of a Zen Buddhist monk, a carpenter, goat herder, special education teacher, director of a non profit group home agency, and vocational trainer.  He also worked as a special education teacher and then as a behavior specialist. After earning a doctorate in Special Education from the University of Oregon he became a Research Scientist at the Oregon Research Institute where he developed his long term focus on families of individuals with severe disabilities. Professor Singer is a published poet and aspiring novelist.  This seminar comes out of a  fascination with movies and their power to bring people close who at first seem very different than oneself.  Professor Singer is a grandfather of six and father of three and has a terrific goldendoodle.

singer@education.ucsb.edu

***FIELD TRIP INCLUDED***
INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

January 21, 2017
10:00-11:50 am
ARTS 2622
      `and`
January 28, 2017
8:30-5:20 pm
fieldtrip

Enrollment Code:  27656

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94JM: Creationism, Intelligent Design, and Evolution
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 pm
GIRV 2115

Enrollment Code:  55921

A great public debate exists on the teaching of evolution in our schools. What are the issues involved? What are the merits of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design?  What are the distinguishing characteristics of science and how well does each of these qualify to be taught in a science course? We will discuss the issues surrounding this important contemporary debate.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94JV: The Beauty of Mathematics
Professor Daryl Cooper, Mathematics

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 27680

In 1610 Galileo said that "The language of nature is mathematics." By this he meant the world, and indeed the universe we live in, can only be understood with the aid of mathematics.  Just as one can appreciate music without being able to read a note of it, and a painting without being able to hold a brush, so one can appreciate the beauty of mathematics without the formulae. We will travel from the mathematically inspired art of M.C. Escher and the infinite complexity of Mandelbrotâ’s fractals to the transcendence of music as epitomized by Bach. We will discover why mirrors reverse left to right but not up and down. We will contemplate the sublime: what is infinity? And imagine the seemingly unimaginable: what shape is our universe? Want to win the lottery? We will explore every day uses of logic such as chance and probability. The only prerequisite for this class is a willingness to suspend disbelief. The course will be heavy on ideas and light on numbers. There is no need for a calculator.

Professor Cooper's main research is in topology which can be used to describe the shape of all possible universes. He is also an expert on the geometry of the infinitely large and infinitesimally small.

cooper@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94LV: Biotechnology and Society
Professor Douglas Thrower, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Fridays
12:00-12:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 27698

We will learn about and discuss effects on society of new technologies developed as part of the molecular biology revolution that has taken place since the 1980s including new approaches to treating cancer, genetically modified foods, genetic profiling, cloning, gene therapy, and the application of "DNA fingerprinting" in solving crimes. 

I am a Senior Lecturer in the MCDB Department.  I primarily teach 3rd and 4th year classes in genetics, pharmacology, and physiology.  Students who take my courses are typically planning careers in medicine, pharmacy, or biomedical research. I also carry out research on anti-cancer drugs through the efforts of a small but dedicated group of undergraduate and graduate students.

thrower@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94MW: The Case Against Science
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Fridays
12:00-1:50 pm
PSB-N 4606

Enrollment Code: 27706

Gallup Polls show that two thirds of Americans do not think global warming is a threat and almost half of all Americans think the theory of evolution is false. Should we really worry about climate change or is that a hoax? Is alternate medicine really quackery or is it systematically suppressed by the mainstream medical establishment? Is intelligent design covered up by biologists? Should there be stickers on biology books, warning that evolution is only a theory? Science appears to be doubted and beleaguered from many sides. What do the courts have to say?  Should schools and universities teach all sides of these controversies? Explore the history, politics, and philosophy of science. Be skeptical and decide whether science can be trusted.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano Studies

1st 5 Mondays
1:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 1227

Enrollment Code: 55939

This seminar will involve screening film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino historical experiences and discussing them.  Each week for five weeks a documentary will be shown in the first half of the class and then students will discuss the film in the second half of the class.  The films witl deal with issues such as immigration, education, civil rights, politics, among other issues.

Mario T. Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He has written widely on Chicano/Latino immigration; politics; civil rights; leadership; autobiography; and religion.  He teaches classes on Introduction to Chicano Studies; 20th Century Chicano History; the Chicano Movement; Chicano/Latino Autobiography

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94OS: Women and Representation
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Thursdays
3:00-3:50 pm
SH 2617

Enrollment Code: 55947

Representation and self-representation has always been a very important issue for women, who have only recently been able to tell their own story. How is female agency reclaimed through representation? What aspects of female experience emerge in literature written by women? In the seminar we will discuss these questions through the work of Charlotte Bronte, Edwige Danticat, Jeannette Winterson and others.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and Feminist Studies. She teaches classes on women's cultural production, twentieth and twenty-first century literature and culture, space and urban studies. Her books include, 'Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century,' and, more recently, 'Stuff Theory. Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism.'  She is now working on a new book length project on work and the politics of not doing.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Werner Kuhn, Geography & Center for Spatial Studies

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 pm
PHELP 3512

Enrollment Code: 55962

Explore spatial thinking and computing for problem solving (sciences), creative expression (arts), and interpretation (humanities). Learn how maps, graphs, and virtual reality aid in learning, analysis, discovery and solving socio-environmental problems. Readings, presentations, and discussions with professors from the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, and engineering.

Werner Kuhn holds the Jack and Laura Dangermond Chair in Geography at UCSB, where he is professor of Geographic Information Science. He is also the director of the Center for Spatial Studies. His main research and teaching goal is to make spatial information and computing accessible across domains and disciplines. Professor Mary Hegarty of Psychology and Dr. Andrea Ballatore of Center for Spatial Studies will be co-teaching.

kuhn@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
4:00-4:50 pm
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 27722

This course is an inside's view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94QI: Existentialism
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Wednesdays
9:00-9:50 am (note new time and location)
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 27730

Existentialism is one of the most important and influential philosophical movements of the 19th and 20th centuries.  It is centrally concerned with the meaning of life in a world in which there are no fixed and authoritative guidelines for human action.  In this course we shall read selections from the most prominent authors associated with this movement, including Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus.  Student evaluation will be based upon daily reader response writings and class participation.

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary political philosophy, though he has also written on film, contemporary American politics, and Heidegger.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94QR: Why Do We Believe In The Supernatural?
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Thursdays
5:00-5:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 27748

Humans across cultures believe in various phenomena for which no established scientific evidence exists (e.g. Gods, ghosts, spirits, superstition, fate, ESP, the afterlife). This seminar examines the universal and culturally specific reasons why belief in such phenomena is so widespread, and why some people believe more strongly than do others.

Tamsin German is a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her work concerns the foundations of human ability to understand the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thought, such as moral reasoning, scientific thinking and belief in the supernatural.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94QV: History of War
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Thursdays
11:00-11:50 am
HSSB 3202

Enrollment Code: 55988

Analysis of the history of war from an ideological point of view (origin, causes, ideologies involved, empires, weapons, etc.)

Antonio Cortijo Ocaña analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th  centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. He is the author of 30 books and 160 articles.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94QX: What White People Need to Know
Professor Paul Spickard, History

Thursdays
2:00-2:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 55996

We live in a racialized society.  Every social encounter is tinged by race.  Some (mainly White) people experience privilege and others (mostly not White) are penalized on account of race.  Many people don't feel comfortable talking about these issues.  In this seminar we will talk about our experiences of race and seek ways to make things better.

Paul Spickard teaches courses and writes books about racial issues.  He has won nineteen teaching awards and is a little bit crazy.

spickard@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94RK: What is Life?
Professor Luc Jaeger, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tuesdays
5:00-5:50PM
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code: 62786

This seminar series is essentially intended to provide a deeper understanding of Life and its origin from scientific, philosophical and religious perspectives. Rather than opposing science and religion, this class aims at reconciling these two visions of the world, which both originate from a common quest for truth. Implications for the future of science and civilization will be discussed.

Dr. Jaeger joined the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department in 2002. He has been full professor since 2012. His highly interdisciplinary research encompasses fields as diverse as RNA biochemistry and biophysics, nucleic acid nanotechnology, material sciences, synthetic biology and nanomedicine. He is also interested in the dialogue between science and religion.

jaeger@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94SB: Computing, Knowledge, and Artificial Intelligence
Professor Jianwen Su, Computer Science

1st 5 Fridays
2:00-3:50 pm
HSSB 1224

Enrollment Code: 27854

IBM Watson beat the best human players on Jeopardy games.  Deep Blue won chess matches over the world champion.  Alpha-Go topped one of the best human go players in the world.  These are examples of computers equipped with artificial intelligence that can do some of the tasks traditionally done by human, only better!  This seminar will discuss the three key capabilities, i.e., computing, knowledge, and artificial intelligence, that are essential for the successes of IBM Watson, Deep Blue, Alpha-Go, and other intelligent robots.  Through gaining a conceptual understanding of the underlying technologies, namely computers, data organization, and search, the seminar intends to provoke thoughts on what computing-centered technology could possibly bring to the economy and social life, what Watson-like robots could do in the foreseeable and even distant future.

Professor Jianwen Su teaches a wide range of Computer Science courses including logic, theory of computation, data and knowledge bases, programming and software systems, and machine learning.  His current research interest is on software systems for enterprise applications.

su@cs.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Freshman Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise and Sports Studies

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 pm
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code: 27912

This seminar provides an overview of information related to basic health and wellness topics.  Reveal and explore wellbeing within the context of college life and beyond.  Topics include, fitness, nutrition, sleep, stress management, mental health.  Students will be introduced to resources on campus with focus on recognizing strategies to navigate a healthy lifestyle.

Amy Jamieson is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies.  She has over 18 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94SP: The U-See Project
Professor Norman Bradley, Writing Program

1st 5 Tuesdays and Thursdays
12:00-12:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 27920

In this seminar students will help build the U*See project--a program to locate QR codes within Santa Barbara County that link to content authored by UCSB students and faculty, including local history, walking tours, photos, and multimedia. Seminar students will work together to turn UCSB inside-out by changing local public spaces into living classrooms and build a template for other campuses to follow.  Help support this innovative and far-ranging educational outreach effort!

Norman Douglas "Doug" Bradley is in his 16th year teaching STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) writing and science communication within the UCSB Writing Program; he is also a UCSB alum (B.A., 1985).  Prior to teaching at UCSB, Doug worked as a project engineer and technical writer at several California high-tech firms.

bradley@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94TD: Got Mindfulness?  Learn How Kobe Bryant, Russell Brand, Katy Perry, Eva Mendes, and Emma Watson Manage Their Stress!
Professor Heidi Zetzer, Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology

Last 7 Wednesdays
3:00-4:20 pm
ED 1207 (NOTE NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code; 56002

It's not easy being a celebrity.  It's almost as hard as being a first year student!  That's why these celebrities practice mindfulness-based stress reduction. In this seminar you will learn helpful mindfulness practices as well as how to understand, interpret, and critique research on its scientific foundations and effectiveness.

Dr. Heidi A. Zetzer is the Director of the Hosford Counseling & Psychological Services Clinic and a Lecturer in the Department of Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology. Dr. Zetzer teaches helping skills courses, supervises graduate student therapists and teaches about mindfulness, stress reduction, and helping people change.

hzetzer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Tuesday, March 7, 2017
4:00-4:50pm
Music Building, Room 2230

Thursday, March 9, 2017
7:30 – 9:30 pm
Lotte Lehmann Concert hall (University Wind Ensemble)

Monday, March 13, 2017
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall (Chamber Orchestra & Chamber Players)

Wednesday, March 15, 2017
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Karl Geiringer Hall (Jazz Ensemble)

Thursday, March 16, 2017
4:00-4:50pm
Music Building, Room 2230

Enrollment Code: 62570

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend a student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Enrolled students gather before each concert for a 15-minute lecture and discussion about the music to be performed that evening. The mini-lecture highlights specific points about the composers' lives, the cultures they lived in that gave rise to the music, and so forth.  The lecture may also address specific aspects of the music, though in a non-technical (music appreciation) manner. Attendance at five Department of Music concerts in the term, preceded by the mini-lecture, is required.  There is no cost for UCSB students to any of these events.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

***FIELD TRIP INCLUDED***
INT 94TJ: Revolutionary Energy: Modernist British Culture
Professor Enda Duffy, English

January 13, 20 & 27, 2017
10:00-11:50 am
GIRV 1106
     ~and~
February 3, 2017
9:30-1:20 pm
Santa Barbara Art Museum downtown

Enrollment Code:  56051

A hundred years ago, a revolution swept over the art scene, and all culture was transformed.  This course surveys these changes with a focus on London, from Virginia Woolf's daring feminist body-writing to Wyndham Lewis's dreams of technology in his magazine 'Blast.' This course checks out these changes in art, poetry literature: we then spend a half day interacting with the art at the Santa Barbara Art Museum  exhibition, 'British Modernism.' 

Enda Duffy is a Professor of English and Comparative Literature.  He is the author of 'The Subaltern Ulysses' and 'The Speed Handbook' and many articles, co-editor of 'Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism,' and other books.  His newest work is on energy in twentieth-century culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94TQ: Why You Don't Fall Through The Floor?
Professor Matthew Begley, Materials

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code: 59261

Some things seem to break frequently (can openers, bike chains) while other things do not -- we hardly ever fall through the floor.  This seminar will explain why things break, and how scientists, engineers, and MBAs decide how to build things that last, or make money, or both.

Matthew Begley is a Professor of Materials and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and specializes in research and teaching that explains why things break, and how to make new materials that will last longer.  Specifically, Professor Begley has worked on microelectronics, solar power, aircraft engines, biochemical diagnostics, and three dimensional printing.

begley@engr.ucsb.edu

INT 94TR: Smart Green Cities
Professor Konstadinos Goulias, Geography

February 1, 8, 15, 22 and March 1, 2017
4:00-5:50 pm
ELLISON 2616 (new location)

Enrollment Code: 60962

Smart cities promote social and human capital, support a more competitive economy, expand participation in government, increase accessibility, and protect natural resources. The instructor and graduate students from GeoTrans will present examples of smart cities from around the world and lead discussions of future smart cities.

Konstadinos G. Goulias is a professor of transportation at the University of California Santa Barbara Department of Geography and director of the GeoTrans laboratory. He is an expert of Travel Behavior and Transportation Systems Analysis with experience in Australia, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Portugal, and the United States.

goulias@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94TS: "Serial": The Podcast
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Tuesdays
0200-0350
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code: 56028

Going viral in Fall 2014, the podcast "Serial was downloaded weekly by five million listeners who experienced drug-like withdrawal when the creators took a break for Thanksgiving week. Unlike traditional mass culture, the new digital medium spawned massive listener participation through Web 2.0 feedback loops on Reddit, Twitter, and Facebook. Online, listeners participated in the narrative themselves by engaging in unconcluded “jury” deliberations about the protagonist's guilt or innocence. Some of this commentary helped to shape the ongoing episodes as they were created each week. Many were frustrated when the compelling narrative ended without the expected closure: on the surface it appeared that new media star Sarah Koenig did not reach a verdict in this 21st century whodunit.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She has edited a volume of essays on the podcast "Serial."

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94TU: Causes and Consequences of Sea-Level Rise: A Geologic Perspective
Professor Alex Simms, Department of Earth Science

Thursdays
4:00-4:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 56036

During this course we will discuss the causes of sea-level rise at several different time scales and its influence on the natural and geologic systems. 

Dr. Simms is a coastal geologist whose research focuses on using sedimentary deposits to understand Earth's recent past.  He has worked on the coastlines of Texas, Antarctica, and California.

asimms@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94TV: Larry McMurtry's Lonesome Dove and the Subversion of the West
Professor Richard Hecht, Religious Studies

Mondays
10:00-10:50 am
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 59246

The western novel is arguably a unique American genre of literature and film.  Larry McMurty's Lonesome Dove has become one of the great classic epics of the American west.  The novel follows the Hat Creek Cattle Company, its two owners Gus McCrae and Woodrow Call, both ex-Texas Ranger, and a rag-tag collection of cowboys as they move a small herd of cattle from the Texas-Mexico border to Montana.  McMurtry's novel which more than one critic has describe as the "romantic west" subverts and challenges the west as constructed by other great novels, including Zane Grey's Riders of the Purple Sage, Charles Portis' True Grit or Owen Wister's The Virginian.

Richard Hecht is Professor of Religious Studies who teaches courses in Judaism, religion and culture, and comparative literature.  His research includes the politics of sacred space, especially with regard to Jerusalem, and religion and contemporary art.

ariel@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94TW: Food Writing: The Good, the Bad, and the Distasteful
Professor Katie Baillargeon, Writing

Wednesdays
4:00-4:50 pm
PHELP 1445

Enrollment Code: 56044

Tasty videos by Buzzfeed, food blogs, #Instafood, Yelp: all demonstrate how food writing has grown beyond its traditional cookbook and review genres. This seminar explores various visual and textual genres of food writing and, via select readings, emphasizes how to write about food and the issues most current in the field.

Katie Baillargeon has a PhD in Musicology from UCSB and has taught in the Writing Program since 2008. Personally, she is fascinated by our cultural focus on food and has themed several research writing courses around food. She also used to sell her homemade cheesecakes in high school.

baillargeon@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94TY: Think and Talk Like A Physicist
Professor Tengiz Bibilashvili, Physics

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code: 56069

The best teaching can be done only when there is a direct individual relationship between a student and a good teacher situation in which the student discusses the ideas, thinks about the things, and talks about the things. Students will solve advanced general physics problems, present and debate their ideas with the class and the instructor.  This course is for physics major freshmen who have taken Physics 20 and enrolled in Physics 21.

Dr. B aka Tengiz Bibilashvili earned his Ph. D. at Tbilisi State University. His Ph. D. thesis was about Non-equilibrium Quantum Filed Diagrammatic. Later he focused on teaching physics and he prepared several Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal winners at the International Physics Olympiads based on physics problem solving.

tbib@physics.ucsb.edu

INT 94TZ: Ruben Dario and Latin American Modernity
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish & Portuguese

Mondays
9:00-9:50 am
PHELP 1444

Enrollment Code: 59253

Unquestionable the most important poet at the turn of the XIX Century throughout the Hispanic World, the Nicaraguan Ruben Dario  (1867-1916) is an obligatory point of reference in the history of Spanish Literature, and of poetry in particular. Ruben Dario  is the most influential figure in the advent of Latin American Modernity. Although Ruben Dario is first and foremost a poet, the class will mainly focus on his short stories and essays.

Professor Castillo was born in Cuba and raised in Puerto Rico. He graduated from Harvard University with a Ph.D. on Romance Languages and Literatures. He has published two books and a variety of scholarly articles on Spanish American Modernismo and Posmodernismo, including a study of Rubén Darío poetical treatment of spleen, the modern malaise par excellence. He is also a novelist and an award winning short story writer.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

Spring 2017

INT 94FH: Moving Forward: Disability in Film and Television-- History of Stereotyping and Change
Professor George Singer, Education

Fridays
2:00-2:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  55889

In this seminar students will watch and discuss parts of classic films in the history of the portrayal of people with disabilities. It will begin with early depictions of freak shows and monsters and move through time to South Park and Game of Thrones. The way that changing attitudes about human differences are reflected in these cultural artifacts will be examined. The seminar will meet weekly for 10 weeks. Reading assignments will complement the films and lectures. Students will be encouraged to examine their own attitudes about physical, intellectual, and emotional disabilities. Contemporary ideas about how disability is defined and situated in a social power structure will be discussed. If you have given little thought to this topic the seminar is an enjoyable way to look into a new area through great films and television.

Professor in the Graduate School of Education in the field of Special Education, Dr. Singer grew up in a family where close relatives experienced disabilities and so the areas of disability studies and special education have been life long interests.  Prior to becoming an academic, Professor Singer had several jobs and roles including that of a Zen Buddhist monk, a carpenter, goat herd, special education teacher, director of a non profit group home agency, and vocational trainer.  He worked as a special education teacher and then as a behavior specialist. After earning a doctorate in Special Education from the University of Oregon he became a Research Scientist at the Oregon Research Institute where he developed my long term focus on families of individuals with severe disabilities. Dr. Singer is a published poet and aspiring novelist.  This seminar comes out of a  fascination with movies and their power to bring us close to people who at first seem very different than oneself.  He is a grandfather of six and father of three and has a terrific goldendoodle.

singer@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1ST 5 Tuesdays
10:00-11:50 AM
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code:  26039

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show and PBS, and has exhibited and performed in over 20 countries.  He is the author several books and the recipient of many awards including the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

seaweed@arts.ucsb.edu

COURSE CANCELLED
INT 94HG:  Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

Saturday, April 15
10:00 am - 11:50 AM
ARTS 2622
~and~
Saturday, April 22
8:30 am - 5:20 PM
FIELD TRIP

Enrollment Code:  26054

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ:  Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
5:00-5:50 PM
TD-W 2517

Enrollment Code: 26062

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative, even artistic? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94IT: The Origins of Life: Are We Alone?
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 PM
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code: 55897

Is Earth the only place in the universe where life appeared? Does or did life exist on Mars? Does intelligent life exist elsewhere? This seminar will explore the question of whether we're alone in the Universe.  Topics will include the origins of life, the search for life (past and present) in the universe, the search for extraterrestrial intelligent life, the future of life on Earth, and the impact of any such discoveries on science and society.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1ST 4 Tuesdays
2:00-4:20 PM
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code: 26088

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94KC: The Murderous Mother: Medea on Stage and Screen
Professor Francis Dunn, Classics

Tuesdays
4:00-4:50 PM
GIRV 2124

Enrollment Code: 26096

Study and discussion of eight different versions of the Medea story, from ancient Greece to the present day.

Professor Dunn's research specialty is Greek literature, especially tragedy, and his courses include Classics 40, Greek Mythology. He was born in Scotland, went to college on the East coast, and has taught at UCSB for 20 years.

fdunn@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94LR: Detecting Climate Change: Tracking the Effects of Climate Change on the Seasonal Cycles of Wild Plants
Professor Susan Mazer, Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology

1ST 3 Fridays
2:00-5:20 PM
GIRV 1106

Enrollment Code: 55905

How do plants respond to climate change? How can we detect and measure the effects of climate change by observing local plant species? This seminar will introduce students to the study of phenology: the timing of seasonal, biological events (such as flowering in the spring) and their sensitivity to environmental change.  This seminar will cover a few of the methods used to detect the effects of climate change on local wild plant species and communities.  Students will record and contribute phenological data to the National Phenology Network's on-line database by participating in the California Phenology Project (usanpn.org/cpp) and they'll learn about local plant life in a series of three field trips.

Professor Susan Mazer is a professor of Ecology and Evolution.  Her research examines the processes contributing to the evolution of reproductive and life history traits in wild plant species.  In California, her research focuses on the ecological causes and consequences of mating system and life history evolution in a group of California wildflowers (in the genus Clarkia). Currently, she teaches the Plant Diversity section of the Introductory Biology series (EEMB 3C); an upper division course in Plant Biology and Biodiversity (EEMB127 and 127L, its lab course); and an upper division seminar in Plant Reproductive Ecology and Evolution (EEMB 194M).  In addition, there are usually 6-10 undergraduates working in her lab per quarter who earn research units as EEMB 199 or EEMB 99 Students and who conduct both field and greenhouse-based experiments.

mazer@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94LT: The Elegant Universe
Professor David Morrison, Mathematics and Physics

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 55988

The early twentieth century saw two major advances in theoretical physics: Einstein's theory of general relativity, which gives a framework for understanding the universe on the scale of stars, galaxies, and beyond, and quantum mechanics, which gives a framework for understanding the universe on the scale of molecules, atoms, and subatomic particles.  Both theories are extremely well tested under ordinary physical conditions, but when they are extrapolated to extreme physical conditions (such as near a black hole), they are incompatible.  We will explore these two important aspects of theoretical physics, as well as a possible resolution to the incompatibility known as superstring theory. Our discussions will emphasize metaphor rather than equations; there are no mathematics or physics prerequisites, only a willingness to engage difficult intellectual material.

David Morrison, Professor of Mathematics and Physics, is an expert on the mathematical aspects of string theory. His recent courses include: Modern Algebra, Algebraic Geometry, General Relativity, and Linear Algebra with Applications.

drm@math.ucsb.edu

INT 94LV: Biotechnology and Society
Professor Douglas Thrower, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Fridays
12:00-12:50 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 55996

n this class we will discuss topics such as why drugs are so expensive, genetically modified foods: good or bad?, the age of personalized genetics, gene therapy, cloning, and forensic biotechnology.  We will also examine the potential benefits and ethical issues associated with genome editing using the recently developed CRISPR-CAS9 technique.

Professor Thrower is a lecturer in the MCDB department and teaches courses in molecular genetics, pharmacology, and physiology.  His research interest is in microtubule-targeted anticancer drugs.

thrower@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94MD: Palestine-Israel: A multi-perspective introduction
Professor Walid Afifi, Communication

1ST 5 Tuesdays
3:00-4:50 PM
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code: 56002

The conflict between Palestinians and Israelis is a central one for both peace in the Middle East and is one that has been tied to our own national security. The United States has been a central player in the conflict and a strong ally to Israel since the creation of the state of Israel in 1948.  The conflict plays an important role in our domestic politics and increasingly is tied to questions of rights and academic freedoms on university campuses and elsewhere. This 1-credit course aims to provide multiple perspectives on both the history of the land and on some of the primary issues over which the Palestinians and Israelis struggle. To do so, Prof. Walid Afifi has consistently invited Hillel Rabbi Goodman to join the course as a co-leader.  Their stark differences in viewpoints are matched by their belief that a wide-ranging understanding of the conflict is an essential starting point for all students of the region.  

Prof. Walid Afifi is a Professor in the Department of Communication, and previous Chair of the Undergraduate Program in Middle East Studies. He co-taught this introductory freshman seminar on Palestine-Israel for 6 years at UCSB with three different Hillel Rabbis before leaving to Chair the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa for three years. He is now back at UCSB and is continuing the tradition of this popular co-taught introductory course.

w-afifi@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano Studies

1ST 5 Mondays
1:00-2:50 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code: 55913

This seminar will involve screening film documentaries on the Chicano/Latino historical experiences and discussing them.  Each week for five weeks a documentary will be shown in the first half of the class and then students will discuss the film in the second half of the class.  The films witl deal with issues such as immigration, education, civil rights, politics, among other issues.

Mario T. Garcia is Professor of Chicano Studies and History.  He has written widely on Chicano/Latino immigration; politics; civil rights; leadership; autobiography; and religion.  He teaches classes on Introduction to Chicano Studies; 20th Century Chicano History; the Chicano Movement; Chicano/Latino Autobiography

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94OZ: Memory
Professor Stan Klein, Psychology and Brain Sciences

Mondays
1:00-1:50 PM
HSSB 2251

Enrollment Code: 57869

What is memory.  The common use of this term in everyday life masks the deeply puzzling nature of the phenomenon.  In this course we explore what psychology and neuroscience have to say about memory and then examine with some care what we actually can say with authority.  In the process, some rather unusual properties of this too-commonly used term come to light.

Dr. Klein earned his PHd at Harvard, 1985; and his BA at Stanford and is a world expert on nature of memory and self.  Serves on the editorial board (including associate editorships) for more than 7 psychology journals.

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO:  From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
4:00-4:50 PM
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 55939

This course is an insider's view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

JUST ADDED!
INT 94QE: Owens Valley, Mono Lake, and the LA Aqueduct
Professor Jordan Clark, Earth Science & Environmental Studies

Friday May 19, 26 & June 9
1:00-1:50
1030A WEBB
Including weekend field trip on Friday June 2nd to Sunday June 4, 2017

Enrollment Code:  69765

This class focuses on a three-day field trip that will leave on Friday morning and return on Sunday (TBD). During the trip we will stop at a number of important sites related to the LA Aqueduct. Finally the class will meet 2 times prior to our departure to discuss relevant topics related to the field trip and 1 time after we return from the field trip so that we can reflect on what we experienced.

Dr. Clark is an environmental scientist who works in geochemistry and hydrology.  Much of his current research relates to water supply problems in California.  In particular, he investigates groundwater flow near Managed Aquifer Recharge sites.  He has taught a version of this class numerous times.

jfclark@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94QH: Global Warming, Hoax or Disaster?
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1ST 5 Fridays
12:00-1:50 PM
PSB-N 4606

Enrollment Code: 26138

The number of Americans who worry about global warming has gone down in the last ten years from 75% to about 50%. Is there less to worry about? What really is the science of climate change? Are the skeptics right? We will explore both the science and the politics of what may (or may not be) either the greatest hoax or the greatest crisis facing planet earth.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94QR: Why Do We Believe in the Supernatural?
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Thursdays
5:00-5:50 PM
BUCHN 1934 (GAC)

Enrollment Code:  26161

Humans across cultures believe in various phenomena for which no established scientific evidence exists (e.g. Gods, ghosts, spirits, superstition, fate, ESP, the afterlife). This seminar examines the universal and culturally specific reasons why belief in such phenomena is so widespread, and why some people believe more strongly than do others.

Tamsin German is a Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her work concerns the foundations of human ability to understand the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thought, such as moral reasoning, scientific thinking and belief in the supernatural.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94QV: History of War
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50 AM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  26179

Analysis of the history of war from an ideological point of view (origin, causes, ideologies involved, empires, weapons, etc.)

Antonio Cortijo analyzes in his research the ideological structures and tensions that have forged the Modern Period across the Atlantic and across the languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula. He deals with issues such as nation building, power and ideology, religion and economy in the late medieval through 18th  centuries, as well as with the larger topic of the relevance of Humanism in the creation of the modern nations. He is the author of 30 books and 160 articles.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94RK: What is Life?
Professor Luc Jaeger, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tuesdays
5:00-5:50 PM
HSSB 2251

Enrollment Code:  58057

This seminar series is essentially intended to provide a deeper understanding of Life and its origin from scientific, philosophical and religious perspectives. Rather than opposing science and religion, this class aims at reconciling these two visions of the world, which both originate from a common quest for truth. Implications for the future of science and civilization will be discussed.

Dr. Jaeger joined the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department in 2002. He has been full professor since 2012. His highly interdisciplinary research encompasses fields as diverse as RNA biochemistry, astrobiology, biophysics, nucleic acid nanotechnology, material sciences, synthetic biology and nanomedicine. He is also interested in the dialogue between science and religion.

jaeger@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH: Freshman Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise and Sports Studies

Fridays
10:00-10:50 AM
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:  26229

This seminar provides an overview of information related to basic health and wellness topics.  Reveal and explore wellbeing within the context of college life and beyond.  Topics include, fitness, nutrition, sleep, stress management, mental health.  Students will be introduced to resources on campus with focus on recognizing strategies to navigate a healthy lifestyle.

Amy Jamieson is a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise and Sports Studies.  She has over 18 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94SO: Writing Picture Books for Children
Professor Christina McMahon, Theater and Dance

1ST 5 Mondays
2:00-3:50 PM
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code: 26294

Remember your favorite picture book? How much you loved the main character? How the exotic places and adventures seemed to jump off the page? You too can write those stories! We will cover the basics (setting, viewpoint, plotting), as well as what makes great fiction great (conflict, character, & contrast). The class is run like a workshop, giving students ample opportunities to share their work and get peer feedback. No drawing skills needed! We will just be drafting the stories.

Christina McMahon is a tenured professor in the Theater and Dance department. She is the author of a new play called STANDBY, an academic book, and several scholarly articles. An active member of SCBWI (Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrator), Dr. McMahon is working on two picture book manuscripts and a middle-grade novel inspired by her fieldwork on the Cape Verde Islands in West Africa.

mcmahon@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94SP: The U-See Project
Professor Norman Bradley, Writing Program

Thursdays
4:00-4:50 PM
GIRV 2135

Enrollment Code: 26302

In this seminar students will help build the U*See project--a program to locate QR codes within Santa Barbara County that link to content authored by UCSB students and faculty, including local history, walking tours, photos, and multimedia. Seminar students will work together to turn UCSB inside-out by changing local public spaces into living classrooms and build a template for other campuses to follow.  Help support this innovative and far-ranging educational outreach effort!

Norman Douglas "Doug" Bradley is in his 16th year teaching STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) writing and science communication within the UCSB Writing Program; he is also a UCSB alum (B.A., 1985).  Prior to teaching at UCSB, Doug worked as a project engineer and technical writer at several California high-tech firms.

bradley@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94ST: Writing Change - Changing Writing
Professor Ljiljana Coklin, Writing Program

1st 7 Tuesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
GIRV 1106
~and~
April 29, 2017
10:00-12:50 PM
FIELD TRIP

Enrollment Code:  57984

The communities in which we live are increasingly facing a complex web of social, economic, environmental, and political crises. As we are forced to look for creative and effective solutions, we resort to new modes of writing that can play a central role in imagining and communicating social change. By visiting Direct Relief, a local non-profit organization, and meeting with socially engaged community members, we will examine the role that writing plays in engaging the public, moving the audience to action, and defining us as active citizens.

Ljiljana Coklin teaches academic, professional, and creative writing in the Writing Program. Her teaching and research interests focus on issues related to contemporary global society and culture, with a particular focus on the rhetoric of border crossings, migrations, gender, and constructions of national and global citizenship.

lcoklin@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94SW: Terrifying Beauty: Aesthetics and the Sublime in Romantic Poetry, Music, and Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 26351

The sound of a Beethoven symphony, the sight of waves breaking on the shore, and the suggestive rhythms of a Romantic poem  all move us deeply, but we hardly know why. Together, we will see, hear, and contemplate theory and the practice of sublime and the beautiful in Romanticism.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He received the 2015-16 UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award for Non-Senate Faculty.

donelan@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 and Friday, June 2, 2017
4:00-4:50 PM
MUSIC 2224
~and~
ON SITE EXCURSIONS
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 (Karl Geiringer Hall: ;Percussion Ensemble)
Thursday, June 1, 2017 (Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall: University Wind Ensemble)
Monday, June 5, 2017 (Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall: Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players)
7:30-9:30 p.m

Enrollment Code: 56093

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend a student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Enrolled students gather before each concert for a 15-minute lecture and discussion about the music to be performed that evening. The mini-lecture highlights specific points about the composer's lives, the cultures they lived in that gave rise to the music, and so forth.  The lecture may also address specific aspects of the music, though in a non-technical (music appreciation) manner. Attendance at five Department of Music concerts in the term and mini-lecture, is required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94TY: Think and Talk Like a Physicist
Professor Tengiz Bibilashvili, Physics

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
HSSB 1231

Enrollment Code: 55947

The best teaching can be done only when there is a direct individual relationship between a student and a good teacher situation in which the student discusses the ideas, thinks about the things, and talks about the things.” – Feynman. Students will solve advanced general physics problems, present and debate their ideas with the class and the instructor.

Dr. B aka Tengiz Bibilashvili earned his Ph. D. at Tbilisi State University. His Ph. D. thesis was about Non-equilibrium Quantum Filed Diagrammatic. Later he focused on teaching physics and he prepared several Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal winners at the International Physics Olympiads based on physics problem solving.

tbib@physics.ucsb.edu

INT 94UA: 20 Questions, Lawyer’s Edition
Professor Gina Genova, Writing Program

Wednesdays April *5, 12, 19, 26 and May 10, 17 and *24
6:00-7:50 PM
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:  56101

Ever wondered what it was like to be a lawyer? What do personal injury lawyers do that is different from criminal defense practitioners? Now is your chance to find out as we pose student-generated and class curated questions to five different types of lawyers, each exploring a different legal practice area. The class will begin with an overview of the profession and a discussion of the LSAT and Law School from UCSB pre-law advisors. Then the class will pose questions for each speaker based on short bios posted to GauchoSpace. The lawyers will then speak for about an hour, answering our questions and generating interactive discussions along the way. Each student will then post a response to the night’s discussion on our GauchoSpace forum for further discussion.

Gina L. Genova, Esq. is a Continuing Lecturer with UCSB's Writing Program, teaching writing for business, law and public speaking. A member of the California State and Federal Bars since 1992, Ms. Genova recently retired from her civil litigation practice specializing in business disputes and torts.

genova@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94UB: Who Will We Be? The Future of National Identity in an Era of Globalization
Professor Fernando Lopez-Alves, Sociology

Thursdays
6:00-6:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  55954

Globalization has, one way or the other, affected national identities, local cultures, and governments around the world.  Our sense of “where” and to “what’ we belong is drastically changing.We will study the sociological and political consequences of this identity revolution.Nationalism has been seen as the source of all evils (world wars, religious conflict, civil wars, racism, fanaticism, etc).  Others, however, have viewed it as a positive force that keeps societies together and creates a needed sense of belonging, contributing to peace and democracy. We will cover the evolution of national identity and nationalism in several regions of the world, with a particular focus on Latin America and Southern Europe.

Professor Lopez-Alves' current research is on the nation, national identity, and nationalism in the context of  Globalization and International Relations. He regularly teaches Soc. 185N, 134F, and 134LA, all of them very popular classes. He has written not only on nationalism and the nation but also on  Latin American politics, issues of  Economic Development, Globalization, and U.S. politics.  He is a regular correspondent for a number of European and Latin American media outlets, and has worked as an advisor to several political parties.  He has  been a visiting professor in more than 20 major universities around the world.

lopez-al@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94UC: Beyond Slumdog Millionaire: Understanding Informal Urbanism through Literature and Film
Professor Eric Prieto, French and Italian

1st 5 Mondays
5:00-6:50 PM
LSB 1101

Enrollment Code:  58040

This course will use literary texts and films as a way to understanding the explosive growth of informal urbanism (shanty towns, squatter cities, favelas, etc.) in the developing world. We will supplement our literary readings and films with analyses by social scientists and urban planners in order to better understand the dynamics that have contributed to this phenomenon and to think about ways to alleviate the problems often associated with such places.

Eric Prieto is a Professor of French who works on the literary representation of place (among other things). Among his current passions are postcolonial literature in French from Africa and the Caribbean and new or emergent (and often hard-to-understand) kinds of places.

prieto@frit.ucsb.edu

INT 94UD:  Keeping Up in the Era of Peak TV
Professor Kara Mae Brown, College of Creative Studies/Writing Program

Wednesdays
6:00-6:50 PM
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code: 55962

In 2015, FX Network CEO John Landgraf declared that we had left the Golden Age of Television and entered "Peak TV"--the point at which too many scripted programs were released for any critic or savvy viewer to possibly keep up with. Though many believe this points to the inevitable decline of quality in TV programming, television continues to be a poignant and important medium in our culture. While many literature classes incorporate film, comics, and other pop culture mediums, TV is still frequently ignored. In this seminar, we will critically examine ten important pilots from the era of Peak TV.

Kara Mae Brown is the Program Coordinator for the Writing & Literature major in the College of Creative Studies, as well as a Lecturer in the Writing Program. She writes short stories and personal essays and researches comics and the role of technology in teaching writing. She watches what most would probably consider "too much TV."

kmbrown@ucsb.edu

INT 94UE: What's in Your Garbage?
Professor Simonetta Falasca-Zamponi, Sociology

Fridays April 7 & 21, May 5 & 19 and June 2
1:00-2:50 PM
GIRV 2110

Enrollment Code: 57877

"Out of sight, out of mind" generally defines our attitude towards garbage. This course aims at familiarizing us with the consequences of our spending habits. What happens to the stuff we consume and toss? Through field trips to multiple sites, we will be following the trail of waste.

Simonetta Falasca-Zamponi is a cultural sociologist who does historical research on the relationship between politics and culture. She teaches classes on social theory, as well as consumption and waste, and has written several books and articles on these topics.

falasca@soc.ucsb.edu

INT 94UF: Hamilton--The Musical as History
Professor John Majewski, History

Thursdays
4:00-4:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 55970

This seminar explores how the musical Hamilton interprets the politics and culture of the American Revolution and the Early Republic.  The seminar will also investigate how popular culture becomes a way in which we connect our interpretation of history to the needs of the present.

John Majewski is the Michael Douglas Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts and professor in the history department.  His scholarship and teaching focuses on nineteenth-century America.  One of his favorite topics is discussing how history is presented in novels, films, and other forms of popular culture.

majewski@history.ucsb.edu

Fall 2015

INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes in the Sciences
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Friday, October 2nd,
Monday, October 5th
Tuesday, October 6th
Wednesday, October 7th
Friday, October 9th
Monday, October 12th
9:30-11:00 am
CHEM 1005D

Enrollment code: 64758

In the first week of October the 2015 Nobel prizes will be announced: Medicine on Monday, Physics on Tuesday, Chemistry on Wednesday, Peace on Friday. We will follow the announcements on each of those days, press conferences, worldwide reactions and background. We will find out how one gets nominated and we will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Freshman Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
1:00-2:50 PM
ARTS 1344

Enrollment code: 27037

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show and PBS, and has exhibited and performed in over 20 countries.  He is the author several books and the recipient of many awards including the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

Saturday, October 17, 2015
12:00-1:50 PM
ARTS 2622

Saturday, October 24, 2015
8:30-5:30 PM
Field Trip

Enrollment code: 27052

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
5:00-5:50 PM
TD-W 2517

Enrollment code: 67819

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in  dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JG: Death, Revenge and Madness in Icelandic Literature and Culture
Professor Viola Miglio, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays
2:00-3:50 PM
HSSB 1237

Enrollment code: 57422

Tragic events are the pivots around which the fascinating and little known Icelandic literary tradition weaves its masterpieces. This course intends to show how these themes evolve from the Middle Ages to about the year 2010 and how they relate to the culture of one of Europe's peripheries, by analyzing Iceland's most significant prose, poetry, music and film production.

Viola G. Miglio is currently Associate Professor of Linguistics and Barandiaran Endowed Chair of Basque Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at UCSB. She has M.A.s in Germanic Philology from the University of Edinburgh and Bologna, and an M.A. & Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Maryland (1999). She taught English and Romance linguistics at the University of Iceland (1997-2002), before coming to UCSB. She has published a number of articles on Germanic philology, linguistics, a book on vowel systems (Routledge 2005, reprinted in 2012), one on The Protection of Cultural Diversity (with co-editor X. Irujo, University of Nevada Press, 2014), and Basque Whalers in the North Atlantic (2015). Since 2014, she is also affiliated faculty at the University of Iceland.

miglio@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
1:00-3:20 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 27060

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan’s Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JM: The Creationism, Intelligent Design, Evolution Controversy
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 PM
PHELP 1440

Enrollment code: 57430

Forty-two percent of respondents in a 2014 Gallup Poll agreed with the statement that God created humans pretty much in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years or so. What are the arguments for and against creationism, intelligent design, and evolution?  We will discuss the issues surrounding this important contemporary debate.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

INT94LQ: On the Derivation of Music from Other Sources
Professor Clarence Barlow, Music

1st 6 Tuesdays
3:00-4:50 pm
MUSIC 1145

Enrollment Code: 67827

Six illustrated lectures in which Professor Barlow demonstrates how music can be derived from language, other music and algorithms. He will profusely illustrate his lectures with examples of his own music, occasionally referring to music by contemporary colleagues.

After teaching composition in the Netherlands and Germany for 22 years, Professor Clarence Barlow took up the position of Corwin Chair and Composition Program Head at UCSB's Music Department in 2006. His main interest is computer-aided composition for acoustic and electronic instruments, often derived from musical and extramusical sources.

barlow@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94NU: Chicano/Latino Film Documentaries and History
Professor Mario Garica, Chicana & Chicano Studies

1st 5 Mondays
1:00-2:50 PM
HSSB 4202

Enrollment code: 57448

This seminar will include the showing of five documentary films on different aspects of Chicano/Latino history.  Topics to be covered include immigration, race, class, and gender, education, and civil rights.  Students will watch the films and discuss them in class.

Professor Mario T. Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Chicano St. and History.  As a historian, he specializes in Chicano history.  He has written numerous books on Mexican immigration, Mexican America civil rights and labor movements, on ethnic leadership, Chicano/Latino religions and oral history.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94OS: Women's Writing on the Edge
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Tuesdays
12:30-1:20 PM
SH 2635

Enrollment code: 57455

Self-representation, the capability to define oneself and tell one's own story, has been and is one of the most important conquests for women and feminists. This seminar focuses on the issue of self-representation and on the contestation of what femininity means in patriarchy in four novels by women writers: Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, Edwige Danticat's Breath, Eyes, Memory, and Angela carter's Nights at the Circus.

Professor Maurizia Boscagli teaches in the English Department and is affiliated with the Department of Feminist Studies and with the Program of Comparative Literature. She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body (Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century, 1996) and another on materialism nd everyday materiality (Stuff Theory: Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism, 2014). She specializes in 20th and 21st century literature and culture, film and photography. In the English department she teaches classes on modernity, international modernism, femininity and transgression, urban culture and space, work and precocity and their representation in literature and film.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Werner Kuhn, Geography

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
PHELP 3512

Enrollment code: 27110

Explore spatial thinking and computing for problem solving (sciences), creative expression (arts), and interpretation (humanities). Learn how maps, graphs, and virtual reality aid in learning, analysis, discovery and solving socio-environmental problems. Readings, presentations, and discussions with professors from the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences, and engineering.

Werner Kuhn holds the Jack and Laura Dangermond Chair in Geography at UCSB, where he is professor of Geographic Information Science. He is also the director of the Center for Spatial Studies. His main research and teaching goal is to make spatial information and computing accessible across domains and disciplines. Professor Mary Hegarty of Psychology and Dr. Andrea Ballatore of Center for Spatial Studies will be co-teaching.

kuhn@geog.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From the Page to the Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Mondays
4:00-4:50 P
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code: 67835

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance. It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes of design and production for theater and dance.

Professor Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94PX: Preparation for Admission to Schools of the Health Professions
Dr. Stephen Blain, College of Letters and Science

Tuesdays
3:00-3:50 PM
NH 1115
 

Enrollment code: 27151

This series of seminars is designed to expose incoming students to the academic and non-academic prerequisites necessary for admission to schools of the various health professions to enable the student to complete all of the requirements in a timely manner.  In addition to course requirements and academic performance, additional topics will include research, internships, admissions testing, letters of recommendation and interviews.

Dr. Blain is a clinical Professor Emeritus from UCLA and Professor Emeritus on recall at UCSB. He is a pediatric dentist and former Associate Dean of Admission, Student Affairs and Financial Aid at the UCLA School of Dentistry and chair of the admissions committee and counsels students in the L&S Advising Office.

sblain@ltsc.ucsb.edu

INT 94QO: In Search of the Truth: Science versus Religion
Professor John Lew, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Tuesdays
6:00-6:50 PM
GIRV 1108

Enrollment code: 27185

Among the most highly charged controversies and deepest divides in Western culture are the seemingly incompatible views of the academic left versus the religious right.  Both proclaim a strong and unrelenting passion in search of the truth, yet rarely can either side come to appreciate, let alone discuss, the others’ views without falling into vitriol and rancor.  We will discuss the root issues that lead to the overwhelming divisiveness of the world, and how we may come to be the agents of unity and reconciliation.

Dr. Lew is Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at UCSB.  His field of research is Alzheimer's disease, biochemistry, and drug discovery. His passion is graduate and undergraduate mentorship.  He has a personal interest in the spiritual realm and controversies surrounding science and religion.

john.lew@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94QV: History of War
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50 AM
LSB 1101

Enrollment code: 57463

Overview and analysis of theories and strategies of war from Classical Antiquity to the Modern Period

Antonio Cortijo is professor of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Author of over 20 books dealing with the use of ideology and propaganda in the Modern Period, the creation of the modern state, and history of religion.

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94QX: What White People Need to Know
Professor Paul Spickard, History

Tuesdays
4:00-4:50 PM
GIRV 2120

Enrollment code: 57471

We live in a racialized society.  Every social encounter is tinged by race.  Some (mainly White) people experience privilege and others (mostly not White) are penalized on account of race.  Many people don't feel comfortable talking about these issues.  In this seminar we will talk about our experiences of race and seek ways to make things better.

Paul Spickard teaches courses and writes books about racial issues.  He has won eighteen teaching awards and is a little bit crazy.

spickard@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94RK: What is Life?
Professor Luc Jaeger, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Tuesdays
5:00-5:50pm
HSSB 1210

Enrollment code: 67843

This seminar series is essentially intended to provide a deeper understanding of Life and its origin from scientific, philosophical and religious perspectives. Rather than opposing science and religion, this class aims at reconciling these two visions of the world, which both originate from a common quest for truth. Implications for the future of science and civilization will be discussed.

Dr. Jaeger joined the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department in 2002. He has been full professor since 2012. His highly interdisciplinary research encompasses fields as diverse as RNA biochemistry and biophysics, nucleic acid nanotechnology, material sciences, synthetic biology and nanomedicine. He is also interested in the dialogue between science and religion.

jaeger@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94RQ: Earthquakes in Santa Barbara, California and the World
Professor Toshiro Tanimoto, Earth Science

Mondays
10:00-10:50 AM
WEBB 1025

Enrollment code: 57489

This course is on earthquakes from all over the world, with emphasis on California and Japan, where the instructor had first-hand experiences. Basic mechanism of earthquakes and various associated phenomena will be discussed but no prior knowledge is required.

Professor Tanimoto is a seismologist, trained in Japan and California, and has taught seismology/geophysics at UCSB since 1992.

toshiro@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94GG:  The Exploration of Identity & Art: Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art

1st 5 Tuesdays
1:00-2:50 pm
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code:    26013

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show and PBS, and has exhibited and performed in over 20 countries.  He is the author several books and the recipient of many awards including the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

INT 94GQ: Contemporary Political Issues in Historical Perspective
Professor Mario Garcia, Chicano Studies

1st 5 Mondays
1:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  54106

This seminar will focus on contemporary political issues both domestically and in international relations.  Topics will include the 2016 Presidential campaigns, race, civil rights, issues related to gender and sexuality, immigration, the Middle East and other key foreign policy areas. Students each week will come prepared to introduce and discuss a particular issue

Professor Mario T. Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Chicano St. and History.  As a historian, he specializes in Chicano history.  He has written numerous books on Mexican immigration, Mexican America civil rights and labor movements, on ethnic leadership, Chicano/Latino religions and oral history.

garcia@history.ucsb.edu

INT 94HG: Close Looking: Examining Works of Art
Professor Ann Jensen Adams, History of Art and Architecture

Saturday, April 16, 2016
12:00-1:50 pm
ARTS 2622
~and~
Saturday, April 23, 2016
8:30-5:30 pm
field trip

Enrollment Code:  26021

Direct examination of works of art within a museum setting afford an unsurpassed opportunity to consider how a work was created, what has happened to its appearance over the course of time, and how installation within the museum setting may alter or contribute to the artist and/or patron’s original conception. This course will take place over two days: on the first day we begin in a classroom for a discussion with slides that provides background information necessary to close looking. We will then move on to the University Art Museum where students will be divided into small groups and given a series of looking assignments designed to teach close looking of both art and installation. Members of each group will wrap-up the day with reports on what they have discovered. The second day will be devoted to a visit to the J. Paul Getty Museum of Art, where we will examine art in all media-paintings prints, sculpture, and decorative art!

Professor Ann Jensen Adams is a specialist in 17th-century Netherlandish painting, particularly portraiture. Her extensive museum experience included work in the curatorial offices of the Yale University Art Museum, a research fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and curated an exhibition of Dutch and Flemish Painting from New York Private Collections at the National Academy of Design, New York.

ajadams@arthistory.ucsb.edu

INT 94HZ:  Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
5:00-5:50pm
TD-W 2517

Enrollment Code:  26039

Millions of people collect everything from fine art to Beanie Babies, from butterflies to limericks, from classic cars to old newspapers. This seminar will examine the history and practice of collecting, as well as some of the theory. Why do people collect? What does collecting say about a society? What distinguishes collecting from hoarding? How can collecting be creative? And you, do you collect?

Professor William Davies King, Theater & Dance, specializes in  dramatic literature and theater history, but is also an unusual collector and author of Collections of Nothing (Chicago, 2008). For more information about what he does, see his website: www.williamdaviesking.com.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94JG:  Death, Revenge and Madness in Icelandic Literature and Culture
Professor Viola Miglio, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays
3:00-4:50pm
PHELP 1445

Enrollment Code:  50419

Tragic events are the pivots around which the fascinating and little known Icelandic literary tradition weaves its masterpieces. This course intends to show how these themes evolve from the Middle Ages to about the year 2010 and how they relate to the culture of one of Europe's peripheries, by analyzing Iceland's most significant prose, poetry, music and film production.

Viola G. Miglio is currently Associate Professor of Linguistics and Barandiaran Endowed Chair of Basque Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at UCSB. She has M.A.s in Germanic Philology from the University of Edinburgh and Bologna, and an M.A. & Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Maryland (1999). She taught English and Romance linguistics at the University of Iceland (1997-2002), before coming to UCSB. She has published a number of articles on Germanic philology, linguistics, a book on vowel systems (Routledge 2005, reprinted in 2012), one on The Protection of Cultural Diversity (with co-editor X. Irujo, University of Nevada Press, 2014), and Basque Whalers in the North Atlantic (2015). Since 2014, she is also affiliated faculty at the University of Iceland.

miglio@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK:  Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish & Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
1:00-3:20 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  26054

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan’s Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94KC:  The Murderous Mother: Medea on Stage and Screen
Professor Francis Dunn, Classics

Tuesdays
4:00-4:50 pm
PHELP 1440

The myth of Medea is a powerful and enduring story of infidelity, revenge and murder. The seminar looks at ancient and modern versions of her story in drama and cinema, and explores how the myth has been made new for new audiences.

Professor Dunn teaches Greek Mythology at UCSB and does research on Greek literature, especially Tragedy.

fdunn@classics.ucsb.edu

INT 94OU:  LAUNCH PAD: New Plays in Process
Professor Risa Brainin, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays
4:00-4:50 pm
TD-E 1115

LAUNCH PAD is the UCSB Dept. of Theater and Dance new play development program.  With the playwright in residence, we produce a "Preview Production" of a brand new play each year.  Through this seminar, learn the unique process of new play development.  Interact with the director, playwright, actors and designers in class and behind the scenes, and observe rehearsals to get the inside scoop on how new plays go from page to stage.   http://www.theaterdance.ucsb.edu/launchpad/

Risa Brainin is a professional theater director and the Chair of the Department of Theater and Dance. She has directed at major theaters across the country including the Guthrie Theater, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Denver Center Theatre, Great Lakes Theatre Company and many more. She is the Artistic Director of UCSB's LAUNCH PAD. www.risabrainin.com

rbrainin@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94OZ: The Self
Professor Stan Klein, Psychology

Mondays
1:00-1:50 pm
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:  50435

This seminar is a careful and nuanced look at both the empirical evidence for and the conceptual issues with the self. Professor Klein will discuss experimental work with normal folk and patients (amnesia, dementia, autism, etc) as well as conceptual considerations to make the case that (a) the self can be known and (b) there is no unitary self.  Rather, the term "self" refers to a multiplicity of "parts", some of which can be undone by neurological disease.

Harvard 1985 Phd.  Professor Klein is a world expert on self and on memory and holds Professor Rank 9 in Psychology with affiliation in Philosophy

klein@psych.ucsb.ed

INT 94QD:  Studying Abroad
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code: 26096

This course is concerned with a variety of topics related to undergraduate studying abroad:  program opportunities, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, overcoming challenges, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus drafting application essays.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His research interests include modern pilgrimage, Islam and Modernity, and modern Islamic movements.  Among his most recent publications is the Encyclopedia of Islam (Facts on File, 2009), which is now going into a second expanded edition.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

jcampo@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94QH: Global Warming, Hoax or Disaster?
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Fridays
12:00-12:50 pm
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code: 54114

The number of Americans who worry about global warming has gone down in the last ten years from 75% to about 50%. Is there less to worry about? What really is the science of climate change? Are the skeptics right? We will explore both the science and the politics of what may (or may not be) either the greatest hoax or the greatest crisis facing planet earth.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental, Analytical, and Freshman Chemistry as well as special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as analysis of artifacts in art and archeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94QJ: Work and The Politics of Not Doing
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
SH 2617

Enrollment Code:  50443

What values are attached to the work ethic, and how does work contribute to define our identity? What happens to this identity when work becomes scarce or precarious? Can laziness, the refusal to work, be an act of dissent and even resistance? The seminar addresses these questions by turning to texts by Herman Melville ("Bartleby the Scrivener"), Franz Kafka, ("The Metamorphosis"), Oscar Wilde (_The Picture of Dorian Gray_), Raymond Carver, ("A Small Good Thing"), Jumpa Lahiri, ("Interpreter of Maladies"), and Roddy Doyle, (_Paula Spenser_).

Maurizia Boscagli is professor of English, Comparative Literature, and Feminist Studies at UCSB. She teaches courses on the literature and culture of the 20th and 21st century, film, materialism, urban culture, genders and sexualities.   She has written a book on modern masculinity and the male body (_Eye on the Flesh. fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century_, 1996), and more recently, a book on materiality and the way we relate to objects in contemporary culture (_Stuff Theory. Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism_, 2014).

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94QQ:  Russian Animated Films
Professor Sara Pankenier Weld, Germanic and Slavic Studies

Thursdays
2:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 2251

Enrollment Code: 50450

Characterized by their craftsmanship and allegorical significance, Russian animated films elevate animation to its highest levels. In this seminar, we screen and discuss varied short films by significant Russian directors, including legendary Yuri Norstein. We also place them in cultural and political context and pinpoint unique aspects of Russian animation.

Sara Pankenier Weld is an assistant professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at UCSB. She teaches and researches Russian literature, comparative literature, and children’s literature. She has traveled extensively in Russia, including across this fascinating and vast country on the Trans-Siberian Railroad and as far north as the Arctic Ocean.

sweld@gss.ucsb.edu

INT 94QR:  Why Do We Believe in the Supernatural?
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Thursdays
5:00-5:50 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code: 26112

Humans across cultures believe in a variety of phenomena for which no established scientific evidence exists (e.g. ghosts, superstitions, ESP, UFOs, spirits, ghosts, superstitions, ESP, UFOs, spirits, the afterlife). This seminar examines reasons why belief in such phenomena is so widespread, and why some people believe more strongly than others.

Tamsin German is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her work is concerned with the foundation of the human ability to understand the actions and interactions of other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thought, such as morality and belief in the supernatural.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 94QV:  History of War
Professor Antonio Cortijo, Spanish and Portuguese

Tuesdays
11:00-11:50 am
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  26120

Overview and analysis of theories and strategies of war from Classical Antiquity to the Modern Period.

Professor of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Author of over 20 books dealing with the use of ideology and propaganda in the Modern Period, the creation of the modern state, and history of religion

cortijo@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94RK:  What is Life?
Professor Luc Jaeger, Chemistry and Biochemistry

1st 5 Tuesdays & Thursdays (new days)
5:00-5:50 pm
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:  55277

This seminar series is essentially intended to provide a deeper understanding of Life and its origin from scientific, philosophical and religious perspectives. Rather than opposing science and religion, this class aims at reconciling these two visions of the world, which both originate from a common quest for truth. Implications for the future of science and civilization will be discussed.

Dr. Jaeger joined the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department in 2002. He has been full professor since 2012. His highly interdisciplinary research encompasses fields as diverse as RNA biochemistry and biophysics, nucleic acid nanotechnology, material sciences, synthetic biology and nanomedicine. He is also interested in the dialogue between science and religion.

jaeger@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94RT:  Beach Literature
Professor Enda Duffy, English

Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code:  50468

From Shakespere's 'The Tempest' to Alex Garland's backpacker novel 'The Beach,' some of the most exciting moments in literature have happened on beaches.  The poet Shelley discovered how to be lonely on a beach near Naples; Matthew Arnold had an existential crisis on his honeymoon on Dover beach. In this seminar we will look at what happens when writers write beach scenes, and explore the deepest meaning of the beach.

Enda Duffy is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at UCSB.  He is the author of The Subaltern Ulysses and The Speed Handbook, and is writing two books, one on Irish literature from an emigrant's perspective, the other on energy, stress and adrenaline in modern culture.

duffy@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94RV:  PLAYWRITING BOOTCAMP
Professor Frances Cowhig, Theater & Dance

Tuesday, May 10 -Friday, May 13, 2016
6:00-8:15 pm
HSSB 1135

Enrollment Code:  50476

A four session evening playwriting intensive that meets Tuesday, May 10 through Friday, May 13, 2016 . Participants will explore the nuts and bolts of writing for the stage through investigations into plot, character, object, language, tone and point of view. Come ready to write and dressed to move.

Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig's plays have been produced at venues such as the National Theatre of Great Britain, Manhattan Theater Club, the Goodman Theatre,  Trafalgar Studios 2 [West End], Crowded Fire, Page 73 Productions, Interact Theatre, Borderlands Theatre and the Contemporary American Theatre Festival. Her plays have been awarded the Wasserstein Prize, the Yale Drama Series Award, an Edinburgh Fringe First Award, the David A. Callichio Award and the Keene Prize for Literature.

fcowhig@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94SG:  The Diverse World of Fungi Living in Plants
Professor Ryoko Oono, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Tuesdays, March 29, April 5, and May 31, 2016
1100-1150AM
GIRV 2110
~and~
Saturday, April 9 and May 21, 2016
lab work

Enrollment Code:  50484

Hundreds of different species of fungi are endophytic, living inside plant tissues without causing apparent signs of disease. Many of these fungal endophytes are often previously unidentified new species. This course starts and ends in the classroom but consist of two 3-hour lab sessions where students will gain valuable skills in how to explore the diverse world of fungal endophytes.

Dr. Oono is Assistant Professor joining the Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology Department in 2014. Dr. Oono studies evolution of cooperation and symbiosis using legume-rhizobia mutualism and foliar fungal endophytes as model systems. The Oono lab is interested in community and phylogenetic structure of fungal species inside various plant hosts across wide geographic and climatic ranges.

ryoko.oono@lifesci.ucsb.edu

INT 94SH:  Freshman Health and Wellness
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise Sports Studies

Fridays
10:00-10:50 am
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:  54023

This seminar is designed provide an introduction into personal health and wellness.  Information will serve to help Freshman take charge of their personal health and guide them toward making healthy life choices.  Topics will include proper nutrition, mental health & well-being, sleep hygiene, fitness & exercise, dealing with stress, developing healthy relationships and alcohol abuse. 

Amy has been a faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the ESSR department since 2004. She has over 16 years of experience in the wellness and fitness industry and holds a Master’s Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enchantment and injury prevention. In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN; a member of the National Academy of Sports Medicine, the American Council on Exercise, and IDEA; and serves as the My Plate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee which recently upgraded to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education. Her broad education and experience in the field provides students with numerous fieldwork and hands-on internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amy.jamieson@essr.ucsb.edu

INT 94SI:  Modification of Microbial Communities for Power Generation and Wastewater Remediation
Professor Guillermo Bazan, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Wednesdays
3:00-3:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  54031

This sequence of seminars will describe how microbial communities can be used and modified for generating electricity in fuel cell devices.  Understanding these functions requires understanding of microbiology, electrochemistry and of how to interface living microorganisms with external circuit elements.  We will also discuss how specific microbial communities can generate electricity from wastewater while at the same time removing contaminants.

Professor Bazan obtained his PhD from MIT and did his postdoctoral research at Caltech.  He joined UCSB in 1998 and holds appointments in the Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials.  His interests are in the areas of organic semiconductors and microbial communities for power generation and waste water remediation.

bazan@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94SJ:  Are we Alone? Solutions to the Fermi Paradox
Professor Frank Spera, Earth Science

Fridays
9:00-9:50 am
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  54049

In a 1950 conversation at Los Alamos, four world-class scientists generally agreed, given the size of the Universe, that advanced extraterrestrial civilizations must be present. But one of the four, Enrico Fermi, asked, "If these civilizations do exist, where is everybody?" Given the fact that there are perhaps 400 million stars in our Galaxy alone, and perhaps 400 million galaxies in the Universe, it stands to reason that somewhere out there, in the 14 billion-year-old cosmos, there is or once was a civilization at least as advanced as our own. We will  discuss in detail the  most cogent and intriguing solutions to Fermi's famous paradox informed by current developments in astrobiology and the taxonomy of exoplanets recently discovered.

Professor Frank J. Spera has been teaching at the University level since 1977. His interests are in volcanology, geochemistry and the origin and evolution of the Earth throughout geologic time. He Has done research in planetary science, physical chemistry and field volcanology in the past 40 years. He teaches thermodynamics of geological systems, Solar System origin and evolution as well as igneous petrology.

spera@geol.ucsb.edu

INT 94SK:  Music at Disneyland
Professor Tim Cooley, Music

Tuesday May 17 and Thursday May 19
2:30 - 1:45
Ellison 2816
~and~
Friday May 20
6:00 am to 8:00pm
Field Trip

Enrollment Code:  63859

Students are invited to think critically about the tourism and entertainment industry. We begin with a modest reading list and one session about tourism and the Disney Corporation. We then take a daylong field trip to Disneyland for a seminar and guided tour led by Disney music executives.

Professor Cooley specializes in the study of folk and popular musics of North America and Eastern Europe. He is especially interested in how music is used by groups and individuals to define identities. His most recent book, Surfing about Music, shows how musicking and surfing can work together to create community.

cooley@music.ucsb.edu

INT 94SL:  A Brave New World: Digging Beyond the Headlines on Climate Change, Energy, and the Economy in the 21st Century
Professor Gabriel Menard, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Last 5 Tuesdays
10:00-11:50 am
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:  54056

Climate change, the economy, and energy frequently dominate the headlines; however, the dichotomy between the environment and the economy, or cheap fuels and renewable energy, is often presented as a zero-sum game or a complex scientific problem with no clear solution.  Here, you will learn the science, impacts, and debates underlying these topics, and refine your ability to decipher these headlines and make your own choices about whether, and how, to adapt to this brave new world of the 21st century. No science background required, and skepticism is welcomed.

Professor Menard is a chemist in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His work focuses on clean energy and sustainable chemistry (labs.chem.ucsb.edu/menard). While his background is mostly in chemistry working on greenhouse gas conversion and clean energy applications (B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.), he also pursued a Master’s in Environmental Studies (M.E.S.) studying climate change and its impacts on the developing world.

menard@chem.ucsb.edu

INT 94SM:  Bisexuality: Identity, Psychology, and Community
Professor Tania Israel, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

1st 7 Tuesdays
11:00-12:15 pm
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:  54064

Bisexuality is largely misunderstood and invisible within both LGBTQ and heterosexual communities. This course will delve into research, theory, and culture related to bisexuality. Topics include definitions, history, attitudes, identity development, relationships, mental health, communities, and activism. Students will complete weekly reading reactions and participate in class activities and discussion.

Professor Israel holds advanced degrees in Counseling Psychology and Human Sexuality Education. Her expertise on LGBTQ mental health is evident in her TED talk, “Bisexuality and Beyond;” her attendance at Congressional and White House briefings; and the honors she has received for her research and advocacy.

tisrael@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94SN:  Lessons from Indigenous Languages
Professor Carol Genetti, Linguistics

Friday, April 1, 8, 15, 29 and May 6
1:00-1:50pm
~and~
Saturday, April 30
1200-0500 pm
field trip

Enrollment Code:  54072

This seminar explores the rich views of the world reflected in indigenous languages. Their endangerment could lead to tremendous intellectual loss, but is also an opportunity for community action and solidarity. The course will involve readings, discussion, conversations with indigenous language activists, and a fieldtrip to a Mixtec community project.

Carol Genetti is a Professor of Linguistics whose specializes in the documentation of undescribed languages of the Himalayas. She is author of an award-winning book, a new introductory textbook, and numerous articles. She was founding director of an institute on language conservation that brings together students, linguists, and speakers of endangered languages.

cgenetti@linguistics.ucsb.edu

INT 94SO:  Writing Picture Books for Children
Professor Christina McMahon, Theater & Dance

1st 5 Tuesdays
1:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  54080

Remember your favorite picture book? How much you loved the main character? How the exotic places and adventures seemed to jump off the page? You too can write those stories! After covering the basics (setting, viewpoint, plotting, & characterization), we will study what makes great fiction great (conflict, character, & contrast). The class is run like a workshop, giving students ample opportunities to share their work and get peer feedback. No drawing skills needed! We will just be drafting the stories.

Christina S. McMahon, PhD, is a professor in the Theater & Dance department. Her previous research and writing has focused on African Theatre. Her first play, STANDBY, received a reading in the LaunchPad program for new play development at UCSB in Spring 2014. She is currently writing children's books, and is an active member of SCBWI (Society for Children's Books Writers & Illustrators).

mcmahon@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94SP:  The U*See Project
Professor Norman Bradley, Writing Program

Tuesday and Thursdays - 1st 5 weeks
4:00-4:50 pm
HSSB 2202

Enrollment Code:  54098

In this seminar students will help design and launch the U*See project--a program to locate ceramic tiles with QR codes throughout Santa Barbara County that link to content authored by UCSB students and faculty, including local history, walking tours, photos, and multimedia. Seminar students will work together to turn UCSB inside-out by changing local public spaces into living classrooms and build a template for other campuses to follow.  
Help pioneer this innovative and far-ranging educational outreach effort!

Norman Douglas "Doug" Bradley is in his 16th year teaching STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) writing and science communication within the UCSB Writing Program; he is also a UCSB alum (B.A., 1985).  Prior to teaching at UCSB, Doug worked as a project engineer and technical writer at several California high-tech firms.

bradley@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94SR:  Film Noir
Professor Andrew Norris, Political Science

Wednesdays
12:00-12:50 pm
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code:  46235

In this course we shall discuss ten classic instances of film noir, or black film.  As our class time is very limited, students will watch these films each week at home.  Accordingly, each student must provide evidence at the beginning of the class of having a Netflix account or otherwise having access to the films.  Student evaluation will be based upon quizzes and class participation.

Andrew Norris is an Associate Professor of Political Science and an Affiliated Professor of Philosophy at UCSB.  He works primarily on modern and contemporary political philosophy, though he has also written on film, contemporary American politics, and Heidegger.

anorris@polsci.ucsb.edu

INT 94ST:  Writing Change - Changing Writing
Professor Ljiljana Coklin, Writing Program

1st 7 Tuesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
GIRV 2110
~and~
Saturday, April 23, 2016
10:00-12:50 pm
field trip

Enrollment Code:  54122

The communities in which we live are increasingly facing a complex web of social, economic, environmental, and political crises. As we are forced to look for creative and effective solutions, we resort to new modes of writing that can play a central role in imagining and communicating social change. By visiting a local non-profit organization and meeting with socially engaged community members, we will examine the role that writing plays in engaging the public, moving the audience to action, and defining us as active citizens.

Ljiljana Coklin teaches academic, professional, and creative writing in the Writing Program. Her teaching and research interests focus on issues related to contemporary global society and culture, with a particular focus on the rhetoric of border crossings, migrations, gender, and constructions of national and global citizenship.

lcoklin@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94SU:  Climate Futures
Professor Ken Hiltner, English

Wednesdays
2:00-2:50 pm
HSSB 1227

Enrollment Code:  46243

This course considers the rhetoric and literature of climate change by way of what is arguably the most significant book so far on the subject, Naomi Klein's, This Changes Everything, which will be the textbook for the course.

Ken Hiltner is a professor of the environmental humanities. The Director of both the Environmental Humanities Initiative and the Literature and Environment Center, Hiltner has appointments in the English and Environmental Studies Departments. More at kenhiltner.com.

kenhiltner@yahoo.com

INT 94SV:  Research as a Personal & Political Act
Professor Maryam Kia-Keating, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Fridays
10:00-10:50 am
Ellison 2816
~and~
Thursday, May 5
10:00-1:00 pm
Field Trip

Enrollment Code:  64329

Research as a Personal & Political Act: Participatory Research with the Latino Community in Santa Barbara, is a seminar that questions traditional paradigms of health and mental health research, which treat people as subjects who are being observed, measured, and recorded for the advancement of science. An alternative lens of research as a personal and political act is considered. The seminar will specifically introduce students to community-based participatory research methods, an approach that engages community members in the work as equal partners, with the goal of moving towards social action. Specialized strategies, such as the use of photovoice, and human centered design will be discussed. Students will engage with questions related specifically to the Latino community in Santa Barbara, and will be expected to explore disparities among a subpopulation of their choosing, with the goal of developing their ideas into a participatory research proposal.

Dr. Maryam Kia-Keating is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in the UCSB Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology and a Licensed Clinical Psychologist. She uses community-based participatory research methods to examine coping and resilience after trauma, stress, and adversity, particularly for vulnerable and ethnic minority populations.

mkiakeating@education.ucsb.edu

INT 94SW:  Terrifying Beauty: Aesthetics and the Sublime in Romantic Poetry, Music, and Art
Professor James Donelan, Writing Program

Wednesdays
1:00-1:50 pm
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:  55160

The sound of a Beethoven symphony, the sight of waves breaking on the shore, the suggestive rhythms of a Romantic poem's.  These experiences move us deeply, but we hardly know why. We will see, hear, and contemplate the sublime and the beautiful in nineteenth-century works and in nature.

James H. Donelan is the Associate Director of the UCSB Writing Program. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and is the author of Poetry and the Romantic Musical Aesthetic (Cambridge University Press, 2008), the winner of the Jean-Pierre Baricelli Prize of the International Conference on Romanticism.

donelan@writing.ucsb.edu