Discovery @ UCSB Seminars List

Consult the list below for information on current and future Discovery @ UCSB seminars.

For details on each Discovery @ UCSB seminar format, see the Discovery @ UCSB information page. For information on seminars from past quarters, see the archived lists page.

Use these links to navigate to the list for the quarter you are looking for:

Please note that if a listed seminar does not last the full 10 weeks, the drop deadline may be sooner.

Fall 2019 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AI: Star Wars: Psychological and Literary Perspectives
Professor Kara Mae Brown, Writing Program/College of Creative Studies
Professor Steve Smith, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology/College of Creative Studies

Wednesday 1-2:50
Old Little Theatre

Enrollment Code:             28266

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away students critically examined the original Star Wars trilogy from a psychological and literary perspective. Students will study Star Wars as an example of Joseph Campbell's heroic journey, with special attention to the psychology of heroes and the film's storytelling techniques.

Kara Mae Brown, MFA is a Lecturer in the Writing Program and the College of Creative Studies. Her teaching and research interests include writing pedagogy, creative writing, and feminist theories of The Force.

karamaebrown@writing.ucsb.edu

Steve Smith, Ph.D. is clinical psychologist on the faculties of the Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology and the College of Creative Studies. His interests include the psychology of men and boys, psychological assessment, the mental health needs of athletes, and ethical uses of the Jedi Mind Trick.

ssmith@education.ucsb.edu

Fall 2019 - First Year Exploration Seminars

INT 94BJ: Eye on the Prize: Nobel Prizes 2019
Professor Mattanjah de Vries, Chemistry and Biochemistry
 

This seminar is held: MTWRF 1200-150 ***During the week of October 7-11 ONLY***

PSB-N 4606

Enrollment Code:             28274

In the week of October 7 the 2018 Nobel prizes will be announced. We will find out how one gets nominated and follow the announcements in the different fields on the days they happen. We will learn about the people and the science in over a century of Alfred Nobel's legacy, involving both life changing discoveries and human drama.

Professor Mattanjah de Vries teaches Environmental Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, and special topics graduate courses. His research interests include studying the molecular origin of life with novel laser-based techniques, as well as applications in analysis of meteorites, art, and archaeology.

devries@chem.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94GG: INT 94GG: The Exploration of Identity & Art:  Personal, Cultural, Familial & Sexual
Professor Kip Fulbeck, Art
 

Tuesday 100-1150
ARTS 1344

Enrollment Code:             28308

The exploration of identity continues to be a focus of contemporary artists. Examining how we create and recreate our internal and external selves allows us to better understand our interactions in personal, social and political arenas. In this interactive workshop, students will view work by various filmmakers, artists and performers, and engage in lively discussions pertinent to their phase in life.

Artist & Spoken Word Performer Kip Fulbeck has been featured on CNN, MTV, PBS, The New York Times, and The TODAY Show and has exhibited throughout the world. He is the author of several books and the recipient of the UCSB Distinguished Teaching Award.

kfulbeck@yahoo.com

 

 

INT 94IT: The Origins of Life: Are We Alone?
Professor Stanley Awramik, Earth Science
 

W 100-150
HSSB 2251

Enrollment Code:             69930

Our seminar will deal with fascinating questions on the origins of life and whether life exists elsewhere. Are we alone? We will discuss ideas on the origin of life on Earth, whether other planets and moons could have life, and whether there is intelligent life in the universe.

Professor Stanley Awramik is a paleobiologist who studies the early history of life on Earth. His interests include the teaching of science, scientific controversies, as well as collecting fossils. He teaches History of Life, Historical Geology, and advanced courses in the Earth sciences.

awramik@geol.ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94OS: Women and Representation
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English
 

Thursday 200-250
South Hall 2635

Enrollment Code:             63073

The question of representation, that is, having the power to tell one's own story, has always been extremely important for women. In this seminar we will read texts whose protagonist affirms her identity and the reality of her own condition, or struggles to do so against patriarchal power. We will read fiction by Charlotte Bronte, Jean Rhys, Edwige Danticat, Jeannette Winterson, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Maurizia Boscagli is professor of English, and is affiliated with Feminist Studies and Comparative Literature. She specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century literature and culture, gender and sexualities, materialism and aesthetics.  her research focuses on the critique of gender, modernism, cosmopolitanism and migration.

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94QQ: Russian Animated Films
Professor Sara Pankenier Weld, Germanic and Slavic Studies

Wednesday 12-1250
HSSB 1215

Enrollment Code:             63396

Characterized by astonishing craftsmanship and profound moral allegory, Russian animated film elevates animation to the highest levels of its form. In this course we screen and discuss a variety of short films by significant Russian directors, including the legendary Yuri Norstein, as we place them in cultural context and pinpoint the unique aspects of Russian animation and of the animated film as an art form.

Sara Pankenier Weld teaches courses on Russian, comparative literature, and children's literature in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies and the Comparative Literature Program. Her interests span world literature plus childhood, visuality, film, and theory. She loves languages (learn Russian!) and traveling, with one highlight being the Trans-Siberian railroad.

saraweld@ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94TI: Department of Music LIVE
Professor Jill Felber, Music
 

Day & Time - One class meeting on - November 19th from 4:00-4:50

Room - TBD

Enrollment Code:             28373

Department of Music Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. One class is required and attendance at four Department of Music concerts in the term is expected.

Here is an example of a schedule for a previous quarter:

Class Meeting

Tuesday, May 28, 2019, 4:00-5:00pm

Room 2224, Music Building

Concerts
UCSB Wind Ensemble
Thursday, May 30, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with IDÂ

   
UCSB Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players
Monday, June 3, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with IDÂ


UCSB Jazz Ensemble
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with ID

 UCSB Gospel Choir
Friday, June 7, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
Free UCSB students with ID

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over five hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

felber@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94TK: Experimenting with the Fundamental Building Blocks of the Universe
Professor David Stuart, Physics

Friday 3-350
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             28399

This seminar will discuss the physics experiments that revealed the fundamental building blocks of the universe over the course of the last century. We'll look at the questions that drove the experiments, the techniques that they used, and the impact that they had. We'll also discuss ways that undergraduate science majors can make their own contributions to modern experiments through undergraduate research projects.

David Stuart is a professor of physics who does particle physics experiments with the Large Hadron Collider. These experiments involve colliding protons at high energies to create new particles, and their anti-matter partners, to study the fundamental constituents and interactions of the universe.

stuart@physics.ucsb.edu

 

 

***New seminar added 7/15/19***

INT 94TP: Not Your Disney's Coco: Día de los Muertos as a Bilingual, Bicultural Community Event
Professor Dolores InésCasillas, Chicana and Chicano Studies
 

This seminar will meet once before the field trip on Sunday, November 3.

Monday 1230-145

SH 1623

Enrollment Code:             73346

Día de los Muertos is the most recognizable Chicano (Mexican American) artistic, cultural practice in the United States. This seminar meets twice (for an hour) to cover the history and significance of Día de los Muertos (pre and post Disney's Coco). We then spend a full day volunteering at a school festival hosted by a local dual-language immersion elementary school (Sunday, November 3). Spanish not needed, but helpful. Enthusiasm for working with kids and at cultural events is necessary! Travel to/from festival will be done via public bus.

Dolores Inés Casillas writes and teaches about U.S. Spanish-language media; Chicana and Latina popular culture; Radio & Sound practices; and Language Politics. She’s a fierce advocate of bilingual education and believes Día de los Muertos is hands down the Best Holiday Ever. (More about her books and writings here: https://www.chicst.ucsb.edu/people/dolores-inés-casillas)

casillas@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94TW: Food Writing: The Good, the Bad, and the Distasteful
Professor Katie Baillargeon, Writing Program

Monday 2:00 -2:50 pm
BUCHN 1934

Enrollment Code:             64113

#Instafood, Tasty videos by Buzzfeed, food blogs, Yelp: all demonstrate how food writing has grown beyond its traditional cookbook and review genres. This seminar explores various textual and visual genres of food writing and, via select readings, emphasizes how to write about food and understand the issues most current in the field.

Katie Baillargeon has a PhD in Musicology from UCSB and has taught in the Writing Program since 2008. Personally, she is fascinated by our cultural focus on food and has themed several research writing courses around food. She also used to sell her homemade cheesecakes in high school.

baillargeon@writing.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Progress
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing

Tuesday 2-250
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code:             28423

This seminar will discuss the history and future of global progress in relation to economics, politics, philosophy, and history. We will study how politicians and the media hide global progress and present an overly negative view of the world. This seminar requires student participation and light reading.

I have been teaching for 20 years,, and I have PhDs in Psychology and English.  I am the author of 11 published books.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

 

INT 94UP: We are Gauchos: Collective Memory and Community Identity
Professor KathyPatterson, Writing Program
 

Tuesday 100-150
GIRV 2135

Enrollment Code:             28431

This seminar explores campus and Isla Vista sites, artifacts, and practices illustrating how what we remember—and forget—about our shared past shapes who we are in the present and who we may be in the future. Field observation and archival research informed by readings from memory studies and local history will be used to examine who we are as Gauchos. Half of the classes will be in a classroom seminar setting; the other half will take place in the field.

I am a Continuing Lecturer in the UCSB Writing Program. I teach first year writing, upper division writing in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and Community Writing.

kpatterson@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94US: Was there an Historical Trojan War?
Professor Ralph Gallucci, Classics
 

Wednesday 100-150
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             63057

Perhaps the most famous story in Greek mythology is the tale of the Trojan War. Until the 1960’s most scholars believed that the Trojan War was an historical event.  Today many scholars deny any reality behind the legend. We will examine why this change has occurred.

Ralph Gallucci received his Ph.D. in Greek and Roman History at UCLA in 1986 and teaches in the Classics Department and Honors Program. Ralph has mentored numerous undergraduate research projects. His publications are in the areas of Athenian democracy and Homeric studies, especially the interconnections of memory, legend, and history.

gallucci@classics.ucsb.edu

 

 

INT 94VA: Responsive and Accessible Web Design
Professor MadeleineSorapure, Writing Program
 

Monday 500-550
SSMS 1005

Enrollment Code:             28472

In this course, you’ll work through the process of creating a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. No prior experience is expected; the course is intended for beginners to web design.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VB: What Can Latin America Teach Us Today About the US?
Professor Juan Pablo Lupi, Spanish and Portuguese

Wednesday 6-650
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             28480

“Populism”, “erosion of democracy”, “authoritarianism”, "socialism". These are some expressions we hear nowadays and are used by the media and political leaders to characterize the current situation of the US. Many people see this phenomena as something new or strange, often use these words without much knowledge of their meaning and context. In this seminar we will explore how Latin America—its history, peoples and cultures—may offer a few valuable lessons on how to understand US society and politics today.

I am a professor of Latin American and Comparative literature. My areas of teaching and research include contemporary Latin American literature and culture, history of ideas, critical theory and the relationships between literature, science and technology. I am a native of Venezuela.

juan.lupi@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VC: Great Scientists Speak Again
Professor Stuart Feinstein, MCDB
 

Thursday 1000-1050
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:             63032

This course will have short presentations from great scientists from the past as well as the current day, such as Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel and Jennifer Doudna. These presentations will be accompanied by informal presentations by Professor Feinstein as well as informal discussions among all members of the class.

Dr. Feinstein is a molecular cell biologist and neurobiologist, who did his professional training in the San Francisco Bay Area. His research focuses upon the development of the nervous system and its demise from Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Outside of science, he has a passion for baseball!

feinstei@lifesci.ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VO: Hammer Horror
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese
 

Monday 200-250
PHELP 2536

Enrollment Code:             63024

 

Hammer Film Productions was founded in 1934. The company is best known for a series of Gothic horror films made from the mid-1950s until the 1970s. It featured classic horror characters such as Baron Frankenstein, Count Dracula, The Mummy and the Wolf Man, re-introduced to audiences in vivid color for the first time. During their most successful years, Hammer dominated the horror film market, enjoying worldwide distribution and considerable financial success. Yet Hammer Films also ventured successfully in other genres such as Science-Fiction, War Films, Historical Dramas, and Contemporary Thrillers. Hammer's films were considered low brow entertainment back in its day, but its films were immensely popular, not just because of the relatively explicit violence shown on screen but because they made explicit the hitherto concealed sexual subtexts of Gothic horror. The seminar is an overview/ reading of the classic Hammer Films, with an emphasis on the horror genre.

Jorge Luis Castillo (Ph.D. Harvard University, 1995) is a Professor of Spanish American Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published a novel (La estación florida, 1997), two monographs (El lenguaje y la poesía de Julio Herrera y Reissig 1999 and Gris en Azul 2011), and two PEN Club Award winning collection of short stories (La vida vulgar 2004 and La virgen de los boleros). He has also published a variety of articles on Spanish American Romanticism, Modernismo, Posmodernismo, and the Avant-Garde.

becquer97@hotmail.com

 

INT 94VP: Fernando Pessoa: a man of many voices
Professor Andre Sebastiao D. Correa de Sa, Spanish and Portuguese

Day/Time/Location: Wednesday 300-550 in GIRV 1119

Enrollment Code:             63503

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the work of Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), the great Portuguese modernist master. Writing in three languages and under the name of 136 literary characters – to whom he endowed biographies, writing styles, political influences and points of view – Pessoa's achievements can aptly be described as embodying one of the most significant literary legacies of modern literature. By exploring some of his most remarkable works, we will explore ways of using literature to expand our own private perspectives and vocabularies.

I am an Assistant Professor in the Spanish and Portuguese Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. I have wide-ranging interdisciplinary interests in literatures and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world and work within a postcolonial and transnational framework (Portugal, Brazil and Lusophone Africa). Focusing primarily on authors from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, I have written on topics such as psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, romanticism and modernism, colonialism, post-colonialism, and, more recently, environmental humanities.

 

My current core project is a book tentatively entitled Songs for a brutal world: ecology and solidarity in Lusophone literature. Under the banner of environmental criticism and spanning Lusophone fiction and poetry from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, the overall goal of this book is to rethink reading practices by focusing on the way literature evokes the affective, aesthetic and political connections with the environment. My purpose is to urge a revaluation of these texts by showing how literature may improve our connection to the environment. In doing so, I try to bear the idea that literature has an important and long-lasting role in promoting a sense of sustainability and ecological responsibility we should rely upon.

 

Before coming to UCSB I taught at the Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. I teach undergraduate courses in Portuguese and Lusophone African Studies and graduate courses on the relations between literature and environment. I also contribute to the Center for Portuguese Studies at UCSB, which seeks to foster the study of the literatures, language and cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world in the US.

acorreadesa@ucsb.edu

 

INT 94VQ: Differential Geometry and Topology of DNA
Professor Xianzhe Dai, Mathematics

W 10-11am
KERR 2166

Enrollment Code:             67389

If you've ever seen a picture of a DNA molecule, you probably saw it in its famous B-form: two strands coiling around each other in a right-handed fashion to form a double helix.

The goal pf the seminar is to introduce some geometric and topological tools relevant to the study of the supercoidal structure of the double helix form of DNA.

Xianzhe Dai is a professor of marhematics at UCSB. He received his PhD from Stony Brook University in 1989, and after postdoctral positions at

MIT and Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, he became an assistant professor at USC before moving to UCSB in 1998.

DAI@MATH.UCSB.EDU

 

***Newly Added 7/15/19***

 

INT 94VW: Exploration of the Physics major: from curious freshmen to young professionals
Professor TengizBibilashvili, Physics
 

W 500-550
KERR 2166A

Enrollment Code:             72942

This seminar focuses on Chicano/Latino film documentaries in historical perspective. Five documentaries will be shown and discussed over five weeks.  The films deal with contemporary Latino issues, educational struggles, civil rights, and the recent Central American refugees.

Dr. B aka Tengiz Bibilashvili earned his Ph. D. at Tbilisi State University. His thesis was about Non-equilibrium Quantum Filed Diagrammatic. Later he focused on teaching physics and he prepared several Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal winners at the International Physics Olympiads. Currently Dr. B is teaching classes and provides academic advice. Most of his students continue their education in top universities or start their career right after graduation with BA in physics.

tbib@physics.ucsb.edu

 

***Newly Added 7/15/19***

INT 94VW: Exploration of the Physics major: from curious freshmen to young professionals
Professor GeorgiosKoutroulakis, Physics
 

Tuesday 400-450
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             72934

This seminar will explore shifts in white masculine identities in the contemporary U.S. alongside enduring forms of social inequality. We will examine the history of these transformations, the ways they have been represented in mainstream media, and their relationship with enduring inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexuality, and more. Throughout, we will critically explore the costs and consequences associated with these shifts and what this can tell us about the future of intersecting forms of social inequality in the U.S.

Dr. Koutroulakis, a native of Greece, completed his Ph.D. at Brown University in the field of experimental condensed matter Physics. He then performed postdoctoral research at the Los Alamos National Lab and UCLA, before starting teaching full-time initially at UCLA and now at UCSB.

gkoutrou@physics.ucsb.edu

 

 

Fall 2019 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AF : Psychological Science in the world of Game of Thrones
Professor Tamsin German , Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesday 500-550

GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:  28738          

This seminar introduces various issues in Psychological Science through the lens of the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, family resemblance, gender roles, how to avoid incest, morality, belief and skepticism, mind-body dualism, concepts of the supernatural, and which character might have what psychological disorder.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 186AJ: School Psychology Jedi Academy:  Supporting Social, Emotional, and Mental Health of Children
Professor Shane Jimerson, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology
 

Monday 12-12:50
ED 1203

Enrollment Code:             28746

School psychologists have expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This seminar introduces how school psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and others to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments. Fieldwork opportunities also included. May the force be with you!

Professor Shane Jimerson is a nationally certified school psychologist, and recent President of both National and International School Psychology organizations.        Dr. Jimerson has received numerous awards for his scholarship focused on understanding and promoting the social, emotional, behavioral, academic, and mental health of children.  You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_R._Jimerson

jimerson@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AS: Fitness & Wellness Leadership
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise & Sport Studies
 

Wednesday 1100-1150
Recen 2103

Enrollment Code:             63065

This seminar will explore concepts of fitness.  Students will receive basic instruction in exercise science and practical application of concepts.  The knowledge will allow students to explore the field of fitness and wellness with emphasis on assessment application, exercise development and program design.

Amy Jamieson is the Department Chair and faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise & Sports Studies.  She has over 20 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.  Her broad education and experience in the field provides students with numerous fieldwork and hands-on internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amyjam@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AW: Collectors and Collecting
Professor William Davies King, Theater and Dance
 

Tuesday 500-550
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             63040

Students will explore the phenomenon of collecting--its history, psychology, economics, and cultural significance--with particular emphasis on the creative applications of collecting, including artistic practices and existential reflections. All students will be expected to start or continue a collection.

In addition to being a noted theater historian, Professor King is a prodigious collector and an expert on collecting. His book Collections of Nothing is part memoir/part essay on the phenomenon of collecting, and it was called one of the 100 best books of 2008 by amazon.com. He has continued his study of collecting with Tree of Life (TM), a performance piece with cereal boxes.

king@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AX: What Psychotherapists Do: Exploring Psychotherapy as a Field and a Career
Professor Andrés Consoli, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Wednesday 200-250
ELLSN 2816

Enrollment Code:             63495

You have heard of psychotherapy; you have seen it in movies and TV. Now you are interested in knowing more about it: who conducts it, what it takes, and can this be a career for me? Come learn about the myths and realities of psychotherapy through process, outcome, and multicultural research.

Associate professor, Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology, UCSB; distinguished visiting professor of psychology, Universidad del Valle, Guatemala; professor, SFSU (1997-2013). Fellow, American Psychological Association (Division 52: International Psychology, Division 29: Psychotherapy). President (2014), National Latinx Psychological Association; President (2007-2009), Interamerican Society of Psychology. Lead Coeditor, Comprehensive Textbook of Psychotherapy (2017).

aconsoli@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AY: K-Pop and Cultural Technology
Professor Sowon Park, English

Monday 4-450
GIRV 2108

Enrollment Code:             67405

This seminar will introduce the concept of 'Cultural Technology' as pioneered by K-Pop. Students will learn to read Korean through K-Pop lyrics (by BTS and Big Bang*), learn one K-Pop choreography (Move by Taemin*) and consider the social implications of a globalized digital fan culture. (*material is subject to change)

 

Some background in dance is recommended though not essential

Dr. Sowon S Park (DPhil Oxford) specializes in British Modernism, Political Fiction, World Literature, and the relationship between Literature and other forms of knowledge, in particular Cognitive Neuroscience. Before coming to UCSB, she was Lecturer in English at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Her previous academic appointments were at Cambridge University and Ewha University, Seoul. She has also held visiting appointments at UCSD and ZFL, Geisteswissenschaftliche Zentren, Berlin. Her latest blog is on cultural technology and K-pop - 'BTS and Fan Translation': https://www.creativeml.ox.ac.uk/blog/exploring-multilingualism/korean-pop-bts-and-fan-translation 

sowonpark@ucsb.edu

 

INT 186AZ: Meet and Greet Your "Natural" Neighbors: Introduction to Flora and Fauna around UCSB
Professor Claudia Tyler, College of Creative Studies 

3 Friday afternoons: Oct 11 (1-4pm), Oct 18 (1-5pm), Oct 25 (1-4pm)
First class will meet on Oct 11th (30min) in the - Transfer Center Conference Room

Enrollment Code:             67397

In this field-based seminar we will spend all our time outdoors, getting to know the non-human members of the communities around us. We will learn about the ecology and natural history of plant and animal species on campus, travel to UC’s Coal Oil Point Reserve to see intertidal, sandy beach, and slough habitats, and visit UC’s Sedgwick Reserve in the Santa Ynez Valley to observe oak woodlands and grasslands.

Claudia Tyler is a lecturer in the College of Creative Studies. She teaches biology courses including ecology, conservation biology, science ethics, and physiology of stress. Her research focuses on dynamics of shrubland and oak woodland communities. She greatly enjoys introducing students to the natural history and biodiversity of our region.

tyler@ucsb.edu

 

 

 

Spring 2019 - First Year Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 89AE: Trust
Professor Norah Dunbar, Communications
Professor Kevin Moore, Writing Program
Professor James Frew, Bren School

Mondays and Wednesdays
0930-1045
KERR 2166B

Enrollment Code:             27391

How do you know if people or data are trustworthy? Trust represents an expectation of honesty and credibility; it allows us to work collaboratively with others. From the perspectives of Communication, Environmental Informatics, and Rhetoric and Writing, this course will examine trust in both people and information that defines social and professional life. Our primary goal will be to examine the nature of trust from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Dr. Dunbar is a Professor of Communication at UCSB. She teaches courses in nonverbal and interpersonal communication, communication theory, and deception detection.  She was the Principal Investigator of a $5.4 Million contract from the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity in 2011-2013 and has had her research funded by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and the Center for Identification Technology Research. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has presented over 90 papers at National and International conferences. Her research has appeared in top journals in her discipline including Communication Research, Communication Monographs, and Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication as well as interdisciplinary journals such as Journal of Management Information Systems and Computers in Human Behavior.

Kevin Moore is a Lecturer in the Writing Program, where he teaches a range of courses, including Writing 105R (Rhetoric), Writing 109F (Film), Writing 105PD (Public Discourse), and Writing 105C (Creative Nonfiction). He also teaches in the Engineering writing sequence. He holds an MA in English from the University of Arizona, and a PhD in English from UCLA. His research interests include the rhetoric of creativity, archive studies, propaganda, and American intellectual history. He also writes fiction and creative nonfiction. His work has appeared journals and magazines including Literature of the Americas, Arizona Quarterly, Composition Studies, Writing on the Edge, MAKE, and Souciant, as well as a number of edited collections.  He writes fiction and creative nonfiction, and regularly contributes film reviews to the Santa Barbara Independent.

James Frew is an Associate Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. He teaches graduate courses in computer programming, scientific data management, and geographic information systems. He has a PhD in geography and has published research on remote sensing, image processing, massive distributed data systems, digital libraries, computational provenance, science data archives, and array databases. He currently advises the UCSB Library on research data curation, and has research funding for data citation (NSF) and satellite image databases (Intel Corp.)

ndunbar@comm.ucsb.edu

INT 89AJ: Socioecological Landscapes of I.V.
Professor Ann-Elise Lewallen, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies
Professor Jeffrey Hoelle, Anthropology

Wednesdays
0200-0350
GIRV 2119

Enrollment Code:             57109

Discover the hidden world that surrounds us, as shaped by human and natural forces, from early indigenous peoples to students today. Through guided walks from UCSB campus to IV and Elwood Bluffs and discussions with local experts, students will gain a deeper understanding of these socio-ecological landscapes.

Professor Lewallen's research focuses on critical Indigenous studies, energy policy, and environmental justice in contemporary Japan and India. She has worked with Indigenous communities in Japan (Ainu peoples) and in India (Adivasi peoples), on development, gender, and grassroots resistance movements. She is the author of The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity and Gender in Settler Colonial Japan (2016).

Jeffrey Hoelle is a cultural anthropologist who studies human-environment interactions in the Amazon Rainforest of Brazil.  His current research focuses on everyday forms of nature control and the logic of environmentally destructive practices in Amazonia, with a focus on gold mining, cattle raising, and beef consumption.  Professor Hoelle is the author of Rainforest Cowboys: the rise of ranching and cattle culture in western Amazonia.

alewal@ucsb.edu

INT 89AK: What's Next: Career Planning in the Arts and Humanities
Professor Rebecca Powers, French and Italian
Professor Ignacio Gallardo, Career Services

Tuesdays
0500-0650
GIRV 2112

Enrollment Code:             57117

This course introduces students to important factors involved in major and career decision-making. With practical sessions from Career Services Counselors and guest lectures by professionals (from fields like business, tech, and medicine), students learn how a humanities major may lead to a rewarding career and how they can begin to prepare.

Rebecca Powers, PhD is a Lecturer in the Department of French and Italian and Associate Director of Curricular Initiatives in the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. She strives to help student understand that the analysis of art, literature, philosophy, history and other forms of humanistic study are both fun and important to life outside of the classroom. 

Ignacio Gallardo is Director of Career Services, where he helps students at all stages of the career development process, from exploration to negotiation. He is an expert in professional development and of the different tools students need to make good career decisions, connect with employers, develop their brand, and attain their life goals. He specializes in the use of new technologies and social media to develop a professional online presence.

rtp@ucsb.edu

INT 89AG: Horror in Fiction and Films
Professor Jorge Luis Castillo, Spanish and Portuguese
Professor Eloi Grasset, Spanish and Portuguese

Mondays
0900-1050 (NEW TIME)
PHELPS 2524 (NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code:             27417

This course will explore the avatars of the horror story in 19th and narrative and its legacy in 20th century short prose and films. As an extreme form of anti-realistic representation, horror stories are able to subvert the arbitrary, frail nature of modern culture and rational, fact-based roots to expose instead the hidden, elemental impulses that rule human emotions. This seminar will situate horror stories and films with their cultural and artistic contexts facilitating thus student participation and in-class discussion.

Jorge Luis Castillo (Ph.D. Harvard University, 1995) is a Professor of Spanish American Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published a novel (La estación florida, 1997), two monographs (El lenguaje y la poesía de Julio Herrera y Reissig 1999 and Gris en Azul 2011), and two PEN Club Award winning collection of short stories (La vida vulgar 2004 and La virgen de los boleros). He has also published a variety of articles on Spanish American Romanticism, Modernismo, Posmodernismo, and the Avant-Garde.

Eloi Grasset is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at University of California - Santa Barbara. In the recent past he has held positions at Harvard University and University of Barcelona. He graduated from the department of Iberian and Latin American Studies at Universite de la Sorbonne and his dissertation is focused on the language change (Spanish/Catalan) that takes place in the poetic work of Pere Gimferrer. His thesis discusses whether this change of language necessarily implies a change of style in his works. He also carries out a computational stylometric analysis of the linguistic patterns in Pere Gimferrer’s work (considering both lexical and phrasal aspects).  
The results of his research have been published in different books and indexed journals: (e.g. Necesitar Devenir Minoritario: sexualidad, territorio y escritura; Memòria i símptoma: ficció i subjecte dins l’espai autobiogràfic). Moreover, in his postdoctoral research, he opened up other research lines that have primarily focused on Film Studies and Comparative Literature.  His current projects include bilingualism in literature with a focus on authors writing in a second language, autobiography and Digital Humanities.

castillo@spanport.ucsb.edu

Spring 2019 - First Year Exploration Seminars

 

INT 94FH: Breaking the Mold: How the Movies Can Break Through Stereotypes of People with Disabilities
Professor George Singer, Education

Tuesdays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:             27433

In this seminar students will view scenes from movies that challenge negative societal stereotypes about people with disabilities by replacing them through effective empathetic story telling. We will discuss the status of people with disabilities in the contemporary US and how the disability rights movement is fighting for change. In addition to studying how disability stereotypes are challenged in recent movies, we will look at the ways that the art of filmmaking is used to deliver richer understandings of fellow citizens with disabilities. 

George Singer has been a Professor of Special Education at UCSB since 1995. He educates special education credential students and doctoral students. His research has been focused on children with severe disabilities and their families. He is very interested in the way society constructs disability and treats people who have physical, intellectual, or emotional differences from the norm. Professor Singer has been a special education teacher and has family members with disabilities. The way movies and television can help elevate the status of people with disabilities is a major interest.

singer@ucsb.edu

INT 94VI: Displaced: Literature of Migration
Professor Maurizia Boscagli, English

Wednesdays
0200-0250
SH 2617 (NEW LOCATION)

Enrollment Code:             59600

At the time of an epochal exodus from the South to the North of the world, this seminar studies migration in twentieth and twenty-first century novels. We will focus on the condition of the cosmopolitan traveler, the immigrant, and the migrant to discuss the effects of the migrant's new, different culture.  Novels by Nella Larsen, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Amara Lakhous, and Mohsin Ahmed and others.

Maurizia Boscagli is Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and Feminist Studies at UCSB. Her research and teaching focuses on questions of modern and postmodern literature and culture, travel and migration, critical space and urban studies. She is the author of Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century, and   Stuff Theory: Everyday Objects, Radical Materialism (2014)

boscagli@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94VL: Climate Change: What It Is and What Each Of Us Can Do About It
Professor Ken Hiltner, English

Fridays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             69492

This course considers the cultural implications of climate change. We will be considering how a range of everyday practices (such as those encouraged by the automobile, fashion, and beef industries) are changing our planet's climate.

Professor Ken Hiltner is the Director of the Environmental Humanities Initiative (EHI) at UCSB. He has appointments in the English and Environmental Studies Departments. Dr. Hiltner’s principal interest is in the cultural implications of climate change. In addition to UCSB, he has taught at Harvard, where he earned his Ph.D., and at Princeton.

hiltner@english.ucsb.edu

INT 94PN: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Professor Werner Kuhn, Geography and Center for Spatial Studies

Wednesdays
0300-0350
PHELPS 3512

Enrollment Code:                             61820

Students learn about the fascinating variety of spatial thinking (and sometimes spatial computing) in the arts and sciences. Each week, a guest lecturer from a different department introduces a particular perspective on space (such as that of architecture, dance and choreography, or public health) and, in readings, discussions, small experiments, and essays, lets students explore spatial reasoning for problem solving (sciences and engineering), creative expression (arts), or interpretation (humanities).

Dr. Werner Kuhn is a professor of geography, specializing in geographic information. He has researched and taught on the design and use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for 36 years, with an emphasis on the usability of these systems as well as of the information they deliver. His recent research and that of his graduate students asks whether there are a few core concepts with which we understand geographic environments and build computer models of them.

werner.kuhn@gmail.com

INT 94QX: What White People Need to Know
Professor Paul Spickard, History

Mondays
0300-0350
HSSB 3201

Enrollment Code:             54148

We live in a racialized society.  Every social encounter is tinged by race.  Some (mainly White) people experience privilege and others (mostly not White) are penalized on account of race.  Many people don't feel comfortable talking about these issues.  In this seminar we will talk about our experiences of race and seek ways to make things better.

I'm a White guy who came up in Black, Asian, and Polynesian neighborhoods and who has been teaching and writing about race for forty years.  I've written twenty books and maybe eighty articles on the subject.

spickard@history.ucsb.edu

***ON CAMPUS EVENTS***
INT 94TI: Department of Music-Live
Professor Jill Felber, Music

Thursdays
0400-0450
MUSIC 2224
~and~
Concerts
UCSB Wind Ensemble on Thursday, May 30, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
UCSB Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Players on Monday, June 3, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
UCSB Jazz Ensemble on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
UCSB Gospel Choir on Friday, June 7, 2019 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall
All events are free to UCSB students with ID

Enrollment Code:             27557

Department of Music-Live is a freshman seminar that allows students to attend student or faculty chamber and ensemble concerts hosted by the Department of Music. Attendance at three Department of Music concerts in the term and two classes are required.

Jill Felber, Professor of Flute, has performed solo recitals, chamber music, and concertos on five continents and has held residencies in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Australia, Mexico, France, Switzerland, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, Brazil and the United States. Ms. Felber has inspired many composers to write solo and chamber works for her and for her flute duo ZAWA!, and is currently engaged in several commissioning projects. She has premiered over four hundred works for the flute and has released world premiere recordings for Centaur Records, CRI, Neuma Records, and ZAWA!MUSIC.

Felber@ucsb.edu

INT 94VN: Rock Docs
Professor David Novak, Music

Tuesdays (5 weeks only: April 2, 9, 16, 23 and May 7)
0700-0950pm
MUSIC 2406 - NEW LOCATION!

Enrollment Code:             75176

This seminar is a brief introduction to music documentary film, focusing on the rock genre from the 1960s until the present. Each week we will screen and discuss films by groundbreaking filmmakers, including D.A. Pennebaker and the Maysles Brothers, and discuss the ways thee films represent the lives of artists such as Bob Dylan to Amy Winehouse in the mediated context of rock history.  This course meets for five discussion sections, each running for 3 hours.

I am an Associate Professor in the Music Department, who teaches ethnomusicology, media studies, anthropology, and issues around the global circulation of popular media.

dnovak09@ucsb.edu

INT 94VJ: God Doesn't Exist and You Have No Free Will
Professor Daniel Korman, Philosophy    

Mondays
1200-1250
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             59618

Each week, we’ll examine an argument for a radical or controversial conclusion, including: that God does not exist, that you have no free will, that you don’t know anything, that it’s irrational to fear death, that abortion is immoral, that eating meat is immoral, and that taxation is immoral.

Professor Korman joined the faculty at UCSB in 2017, after ten years teaching at the University of Illinois. His primary interests are in metaphysics, metaethics, the philosophy of mind and language, and the theory of knowledge.

dkorman@ucsb.edu

INT 94QD: Studying Abroad
Professor Juan Campo, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
0100-0150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             27516

This seminar is designed to prepare students for studying abroad as undergraduates at UCSB.  We will cover a variety of topics related to this topic:  program options, choosing where to go, when and how to apply, overcoming challenges, earning GE and major credits, internships and career opportunities.  Students will meet with study abroad returnees and advisors, plus draft an application/scholarship essay.

Juan Campo is an Associate Professor of Religious studies and Faculty Director of the UCSB Education Abroad Program.  He teaches courses on contemporary Islamic topics and comparative religions.  As an undergraduate and graduate student he studied in Israel and Egypt.  As a professor, Dr. Campo served as an EAP study center director in Egypt and India.  His research interests include modern pilgrimages, Islam and Modernity, modern Islamic movements, and religion and the culinary cultures of the Middle East.  Among his most recent publications is the Encyclopedia of Islam (Facts on File, 2009), which is now going into a second expanded edition.  His current research includes field research in the Middle East, India, and Mexico.

campo@ucsb.edu

INT 94VM: Advocating for Scholars at Risk
Professor Kathleen Moore, Religious Studies

Tuesdays
0300-0350
HSSB 3041

Enrollment Code:             70839

In collaboration with the organization Scholars at Risk Network (SAR) we will work as the case responsible entity for a Saudi feminist facing unjust restrictions, prosecution, or imprisonment for her ideas. With the assistance of SAR, we will continue to work on the case of Dr. Hatoon al-Fassi, a female professor in Saudi Arabia, who was selected from SAR's list of imprisoned or persecuted scholars. We will develop an advocacy strategy to help raise consciousness and work towards the release of this person from prison or from persecution. To these ends, we will discuss and compare pertinent notions of academic freedom and free speech, conduct background research on the region, including historical, political, legal and economic aspects pertaining to the case.

Moore is a Religious Studies professor with expertise in Islam in America and law and religion. She is currently writing a book entitled Shari'a Revoiced: California Muslims Speak About Islamic Law. She frequently serves as an expert witness in litigation regarding religious expression and workplace discrimination. Her publications appear in The Oxford Handbook of American Islam, The Cambridge Companion to American Islam, The Routledge Handbook of Islam in the West, and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. Her books include The Unfamiliar Abode: Islamic Law in the United States and Britain (Oxford University Press, 2010); Muslim Women in America: Challenges facing Islamic Identity Today (Oxford University Press, 2011); and Al-Mughtaribun: American Law and the Transformation of Muslim Life in America (SUNY Press, 1995).

kmoore@religion.ucsb.edu

INT 94JK: Latin America in Film
Professor Ellen McCracken, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 4 Tuesdays
0200-0420
HSSB 4202

Enrollment Code:             27466

This seminar is an introduction to new Latin American film focusing on such countries as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. We will study key films as a means of understanding contemporary social and cultural issues that preoccupy Latin America, including the origins of revolutionary struggles in the 1960s, the dictatorships of the 1970s-80s, and contemporary political struggles. How do feature and documentary films rearticulate these and other issues for contemporary audiences?   Additionally, how do these films relate to contemporary U.S. films that portray Latin America? What defines a Latin American film in the age of globalization? How does Latin America portray itself cinematically in contrast to U.S. films such as Julie Taymor's Frida or John Duigan's Romero? We will combine close readings of select films and excerpts with a general introduction to Latin American studies through film.

Ellen McCracken teaches U.S. Latino Literature and contemporary Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

emccr@spanport.ucsb.edu

***LAB***
INT 94UT: Oral Interpreting: Hands On!
Professor Aline Alves Ferreira, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Mondays and Wednesdays
0800-0850
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             27623

This course comprises topics that are important to develop skills for interpreting into and from Spanish and/or Portuguese.

Dr. Aline Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She is the director of the Bilingualism, Translation, and Cognition Laboratory and was post-doctoral research fellow in psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. She is the coeditor of the books The Handbook of Translation and Cognition (Wiley Blackwell), The Development of Translation Competence: Theories and Methodologies from Psycholinguistics and Cognitive Science, (Cambridge Scholars Publishing), and Psycholinguistic and cognitive inquiries into translation and interpreting (John Benjamins. Professor Ferreira has also published studies in journals and books such as Translation and Interpreting Studies, Translation, Cognition and Behavior, Spanish Journal of Applied Linguistics, Cognitive control and consequences of multilingualism (John Benjamins Publishing), Reading and Writing (Springer), Intersections of language and social justice (International Society for Language Studies, Inc.), and The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Linguistics (Routledge) (among others). Ferreira has created and taught the seminar, "Oral Interpreting: Hands On!" and the upper-division courses, "Translation" and "Interpreting" and she is revamping some of the traditional courses (e.g. Bilingualism).

aferreira@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94VH: Feminist Thinking and Activism in 20th-21st Century Spain
Professor Silvia Bermudez, Spanish and Portuguese

1st 5 Tuesdays
0100-0250
HSSB 4201

Enrollment Code:             59592

The purpose of this Exploration seminar is to familiarize students with the feminist cultural history of Contemporary Spain taking into account its diverse geopolitical areas and languages--including Catalonia, Galicia, and the Basque Country.  Particular attention will be paid to the work of women filmmakers and to issues such as Gender Violence and Grassroots Movements.

Professor Bermudez' areas of research and teaching are the cultural productions (especially literature and music) of the Iberian Peninsula, Equatorial Guinea, and Latin America, particularly Peru. Her critical work focuses on migration studies, feminism, women's studies, poetic discourses, and politics. One of her 2018 publications is the co-edited volume “A New History of Iberian Feminisms” (University of Toronto Press).

bermudez@spanport.ucsb.edu

INT 94PO: From The Page To The Stage
Professor Vickie Scott, Theater and Dance

Wednesdays
0400-0450
TD-W 1530

Enrollment Code:             54130

This course is an insider’s view into the creative and collaborative processes of live performance.  It focuses on the analysis, research, selection, implementation and critical evaluation processes as part of design for theatrical performance.

Vickie J. Scott teaches lighting and scenic design for theater and dance, designs productions in the Department of Theater and Dance, and mentors students.  She is a graduate of the School of Theater, Film and Television at UCLA with degrees in both Lighting Design and Technical Direction.  Her recent work at UCSB includes: VENUS and THE DEATH OF KINGS.

scott@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

***LAB***
INT 94VD: Puppet Design and Fabrication
Professor Christina McCarthy, Theater and Dance

Tuesdays
0100-0150
HSSB 1105

Enrollment Code:             54171

Build your own rod style puppet while immersing yourself in learning about various building techniques translatable to many puppet styles including shadow puppets, marionettes, and large scale parade puppets. Each student will design and fabricate their own puppet and have the opportunity to delve into simple mechanisms for realistic body movement.

Christina McCarthy is a multimedia artist working in dance, theater, puppetry and film, embracing all of these forms as she seeks to tell stories in innovative ways. As a former student of Engineering, she decodes the mechanisms to give puppets realistic movement qualities with rudimentary building materials. She is a maker of animated performance space.

cmccarthy@theaterdance.ucsb.edu

INT 94TW: Food Writing: The Good, the Bad, and the Distasteful
Professor Katie Baillargeon, Writing Program

Wednesdays
0300-0350
GIRV 2135

Enrollment Code:             54155

Tasty videos by Buzzfeed, food blogs, #Instafood, Yelp: all demonstrate how food writing has grown beyond its traditional cookbook and review genres. This seminar explores various visual and textual genres of food writing and, via select readings, emphasizes how to write about food and understand the issues most current in the field.

Katie Baillargeon has a PhD in Musicology from UCSB and has taught in the Writing Program since 2008. Personally, she is fascinated by our cultural focus on food and has themed several research writing courses around food. She also used to sell her homemade cheesecakes in high school.

baillargeon@writing.ucsb.edu

INT 94UO: The Future of Global Politics
Professor Robert Samuels, Writing Program

Tuesdays
1100-1150
GIRV 1108

Enrollment Code:             27581

This seminar will examine what kind of government and politics we need in order to deal with the problems of climate change, global trade, poverty, genetic experimentation, artificial intelligence, crime, pandemics, and terrorism.  We will explore together the issue of global governance.

Robert Samuels has doctorates in Psychology and English.  He teaches in the UCSB writing program and is the author of 11 books, including Why Public Higher education Should be Free and Educating Inequality.

bobsamuels_us@yahoo.com

INT 94VA: Create a RARE website: Responsive, Accessible, Rhetorically Effective Web Design Made (Sort of) Easy
Professor Madeleine Sorapure, Writing Program

Mondays
0400-0450
PHELP 1518

Enrollment Code:             54163

The class is intended for beginners who don't know HTML or CSS but would like to learn; no experience with web design is necessary. In this course, you'll create a website that you can use for your academic, professional, and personal work during your time at UCSB. The website can grow and evolve along with you over the next four years, as you add writing, images, video, and other elements that convey your knowledge, skills, and interests. You'll learn some basic HTML and CSS in order to modify templates and learn strategies for making your site responsive on different devices, accessible to a range of users, and rhetorically effective in conveying your content.

Madeleine Sorapure is director of the Writing Program and of the Multimedia Communication track of the Professional Writing Minor. Her teaching and research focus on digital composition, web design, and data visualization.

sorapure@writing.ucsb.edu

Spring 2019 - Transfer Exploration Seminars

INT 186AJ: School Psychology Jedi Academy: Supporting Social, Emotional, and Mental Health of Children
Professor Shane Jimerson, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology

Mondays
1200-1250
ED 1201

Enrollment Code:             54122

School psychologists have expertise in mental health, learning, and behavior, to help youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This seminar introduces how school psychologists partner with families, teachers, school administrators, and others to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments. Fieldwork also included. May the force be with you!

Professor Shane Jimerson is a nationally certified school psychologist, and recent President of both National and International School Psychology organizations. Dr. Jimerson has received numerous awards for his scholarship focused on understanding and promoting the social, emotional, behavioral, academic, and mental health of children.  You can learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_R._Jimerson

Jimerson@ucsb.edu

INT 186AS: Fitness Leadership
Professor Amy Jamieson, Exercise & Sport Studies

Fridays
1000-1050
RECEN 2103

Enrollment Code:             56895

This seminar will explore concepts of fitness.  Students will receive basic instruction in exercise science and practical application of concepts.  The knowledge will allow students to explore the field of fitness and wellness with emphasis on exercise development and program design.

Amy Jamieson is the Department Chair and faculty member at UC Santa Barbara in the department of Exercise & Sports Studies.  She has over 20 years experience in the wellness and fitness industry and spends most of her time working as a lecturer and educator. Amy holds a Masters Degree in Exercise and Health Science with an emphasis in performance enhancement and injury prevention.   In addition, she is a certified Nutritionist through the AASDN and serves as the MyPlate Ambassador at UC Santa Barbara. Amy is the chair of the ESS Wellness Committee, responsible for creating and implementing student wellness based programs and resources including the upgraded Wellness and Fitness Institute designed to provide a platform for academic learning and student wellness education.  Her broad education and experience in the field provides students with numerous fieldwork and hands-on internships in the field of health, wellness and fitness.

amyjam@ucsb.edu

INT 186AF: Psychological Science in the World of Game of Thrones
Professor Tamsin German, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Tuesdays
0500-0550
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             27755

This seminar introduces various issues in Psychological Science through the lens of the HBO show "Game of Thrones". Topics will include, among others, family resemblance, gender roles, religious belief and skepticism, the mind-body problem, concepts of the supernatural, how to avoid incest, and which character might have what psychological disorder.

Tamsin German is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Her research concerns the cognitive foundations of the human capacity for understanding other people, and its relationship to other domains of human thinking, such as how we represent and reason about supernatural entities like Gods and ghosts.

tamsin.german@psych.ucsb.edu

INT 186AU: Key Concepts in Psychology
Professor Stanley Klein, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Mondays
0100-0150
HSSB 2201

Enrollment Code:             59584

In this seminar we will take a critical look at many of the conceptually underdeveloped constructs that populate psychological science.  Particular attention will be given to exactly what we intend by terms such as Self, Memory, Mind, Consciousness.  In addition, we will ask whether Psychology is a science and if not, whether it should be?

Professor Klein earned his BS at Stanford and his PHd at Harvard. 

klein@psych.ucsb.edu

Spring 2019 - Transfer Discovery & Linked Seminars

INT 187AF: Ocean Memory
Professor Melody Jue, English
Professor Alyson Santoro, Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology

Tuesdays
0300-0450
GIRV 2120

Enrollment Code:             57042

This seminar explores new ways to study the ocean through the framework of “memory.” How might the ocean be said to “remember” its past? Do communities of organisms (or microorganisms) retain
memories” of past events, in order to anticipate and respond to future challenges? Understanding how memory exists for a particular ecosystem provides a powerful foundation for asking an important additional question: where and when might disruptions of memory in the ocean occur? Do communities in the ocean experience dementia or memory loss? This seminar will blend perspectives from science and the humanities to explore these questions.

Melody Jue is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests include ocean & environmental humanities, science fiction, media, and science & technology studies. Drawing on the experience of becoming a scuba diver, her current book project, ""Wild Blue Media: Thinking Through Seawater"" (forthcoming with Duke Press), aims to develop a theory of mediation specific to the ocean environment. It not only expands the definition of media to include natural elements ”like seawater” but also closely examines the conceptual language of media theory.

Alyson Santoro is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. Her research focuses on the role of microbes in marine ecosystems. She is interested in cultivating new microbes and discovering novel ways of tracking their activity. A particular focus of her lab is the marine archaea, a largely uncultured group of microbes. In pursuit of her research, she has spent nearly a year of her life at sea including expeditions to Micronesia, Cuba, and the Equatorial Pacific. Findings from her recent research include the discovery that archaea in the ocean can make the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and that some marine archaea have exceptionally small genomes.

mjue@ucsb.edu

***JUST ADDED***
INT 187AG: Central American Odysseys (1970-2020)
Professor Charles Hale, Dean of Social Sciences

Tuesdays
0500-0650 pm
GIRV 1112

Enrollment Code:             67934

Since 2015, UC Santa Barbara has proudly maintained our status as a ‘Hispanic Serving Institution.’ A significant, but unspecified, number of these students are sure to be of Central American heritage. Although there are similarities among all Hispanic (or Latinx) students, varying national origins are important for many reasons. In this seminar we will work toward an understanding of the social identity ‘Central American-American,’ starting with the study of the societies from which they have come, with a special emphasis on Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua. Our point of departure will be the ‘revolutionary era’ in Central America (1960s-70s) a time of great hope for egalitarian social transformation, ultimately crushed by political, economic and military elites, with ample backing from the United States. Our first objective will be to place the current crisis (desperate societal conditions, migration to the north, etc.) in historical perspective, by exploring this hypothesis: we are reaping now the consequences of seeds sown 50 years ago, during the revolutionary era. Our second objective is to explore cultural-political conditions in these societies today, going beyond the headlines of violence and economic distress. The third and final objective is to deepen our understanding of Central American-American experiences close to home, in California and on the UC Santa Barbara campus. Students with Central American backgrounds and command of Spanish are especially encouraged to enroll in this seminar.

Dean of Social Sciences, Dr. Hale is an anthropologist specializing in Central American cultural politics.

crhale@ucsb.edu